Justice League re-created as traditional Malaysian shadow puppets

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DC Superheroes re-imagined as traditional Malaysian Wayang Kulit shadow puppets by Fusion Wayang Kulit!

Called the DC Superhero Wayang Kulit Exhibition, Tintoy Chuo and his Fusion Wayang Kulit first came into prominence when they first performed Peperangan Bintang (the direct Malay translation for Star Wars) back in 2013.

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Soy Shape saucers add a third dimension to your sushi experience

soy shapes

RocketNews 24 (by Michelle Hughes):

These dishes make playing with your food look classy and intelligent.

There’s always something cool and unusual to be found on Kickstarter, like ramen charts, samurai armor hoodies, or, in this case, ceramic saucers that play tricks with your eyes when filled with soy sauce.

▼ Soy Shape models “Cubes” and “Impossible Triangle”

soy shapes dishes

As for exactly how this optical illusion works,Tokyo-based creator and designer Duncan Shotton says that the slightly varying levels of the inner surface of the saucers take advantage of natural color gradations that occur in soy sauce at different depths. Thus, when the saucers are filled, the soy sauce takes on a 3-D quality.

The dishes are made from Hakuji porcelain in Gifu. Hakuji ceramics have a legacy stretching back to the 1600s, so the Soy Shape saucers are definitely going to be high-class.

soy shapes boxes

You already know the drill when it comes to Kickstarter: the more you pledge, the more awesome the perks become.  Although the campaign has already raised nearly four times the amount of its initial goal, you can still get in on the action and score a Soy Shape at prices starting at US$19.50.

There’s only a few days left in the Soy Shape campaign, so head on over to theKickstarter page ASAP if you’re looking to pick one up.

Concept art for Chris Evans and Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Akira is shockingly cool

i09 (by Rob Bricken):

The idea of a live-action American remake of the seminal anime movie Akira has always seemed like a disaster in the making to me, and the fact that the movie has languished in various forms of development hell seems to corroborate that idea. But after seeing this concept art of Chris Evans and Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the Kaneda and Tetsuo roles, I almost want to change my mind.

The art comes from director Ruairí Robinson, who was attached in one of the film’s many, many incarnations. Apparently, he shared it back in 2014, but it was Bloody Disgusting who let the rest of the internet know, and I thank them, because look at this:

Robinson has several more pics and storyboards here, if you’re so inclined. And, if you start feeling like you’re truly sad the world was robbed of this adaptation, it’s worth remembering that awesome concept art does not a quality film make (although it certainly helps). Also, JGL’s Tetsuo was going to be named “Travis,” so I wouldn’t necessarily shed any tears.

New book reworks classic paintings in modern Japanese illustration styles

Ever wondered what Munch’s The Scream or Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring might look like if done in modern day Japan? If so, then this book is for you!

Eshi de Irodoru Sekai no Meiga by publisher Side Ranch is a new coffee table book that fuses the artistic sensibilities of centuries-old painters with those of modern illustrators from the manga, anime, and video game worlds of Japan.

In total, 43 masterpieces from the likes of Monet, Picasso, and Van Gogh have been re-imagined by 43 different Japanese commercial artists, including smartphone game illustrator Kina Haruka and character designer for Medabots (Medarot in Japan) Rin Horuma. Classic Japanese artists like Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Tawaraya Sotatsu are also given an updated look in this book.

Each full page illustration is accompanied by a look at the original work and a commentary by the illustrator.

Eshi de Irodoru Sekai no Meiga will hit bookstores in Japan on 26 May for 2,200 yen (US$20). The first customers to buy over-the-counter may also receive a postcard depicting an interpretation of Johannes Vermeer’s The Milkmaid.

It’s always fun to see pop culture and high culture collide in colorful ways like this book. So why not pick up a copy and brush up on both art history and current illustrators in Japan. We’ll leave you with a partial list of some of the works covered.

■ Girl with a Pearl Earring – Johannes Vermeer, c. 1665
■ The Gleaners – Jean-Francois Millet, 1857
■ Sunflowers – Vincent Van Gogh, 1888
■ The Scream – Edvard Munch, 1893
■ Les Demoiselles d’Avignon – Pablo Picasso, 1907
■ 
The Snake Charmer – Henri Rousseau, 1907
■ The Milkmaid – Johannes Vermeer, c. 1657
■ The Birth of Venus – Sandro Botticelli, c. 1485
■ Primavera – Sandro Botticelli, c. 1482
■ Ophelia – John Everett Millais, 1852
■ Tahitian Women on the Beach – Paul Gauguin, 1891
■ The Night Watch – Rembrandt van Rijn, 1642
■ Fujin Raijin-zu – Tawaraya Sōtatsu, c. 1650
■ 
Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre – Utagawa Kuniyoshi, c. 1844
■ 
The Kiss – Gustav Klimt, 1908
■ Le Divan Japonais – Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892
■ Woman with a Parasol: Madame Monet and Her Son – Claude Monet, 1875

Source: Dream News

Tokyo 2020 official Olympic logo unveiled after plagiarism scandal

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NBC News (by

The new official emblem of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics was unveiled by organizers Monday, replacing an earlier design that was dropped after a complaint alleging plagiarism.

The chosen checkered logo conveys “the message of unity in diversity,” officials announced.

It was selected from a shortlist of four published earlier this month after a public contest that attracted 14,599 entries.

The original, by art director Kenjiro Sano, was withdrawn last summer after Belgian artist Olivier Debie claimed that it echoed his work for the Theatre de Liege. Sano denied the allegation.

The new indigo blue logo, called “Harmonized checkered emblem,” was created by artist and architecture graduate Asao Tokolo, 47.

It “expresses a refined elegance and sophistication that exemplifies Japan,” Tokyo 2020 officials said in a statement.

Composed of three varieties of rectangular shapes, the design represents different countries, cultures and ways of thinking. It incorporates the message of unity in diversity.”

Image: Asao Tokolo
Designer Asao Tokolo holds his designs for the logo of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, left, and the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games.

The organizing committee for the Tokyo Summer Games has been plagued by fumbles. Last year, the original design for the main stadium was scrapped over mushrooming construction costs and public disapproval of the design, which had been likened to a bicycle helmet.

The winning logo was selected from these four shortlisted emblems.