Carry your laptop inside your clothes with the new “Packable Parka” from Japan

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RocketNews 24 (by Oona McGee):

Leave your bag at home and fill up the pockets of this denim hoodie with all your tech instead.

These days, cafes around the world are filled with people plugged into the online realm, typing on their laptops and scrolling through pages of information on their mobile phones. While the portability of notebooks and laptops makes it easier than ever to work online outside of the home, there’s been little advancement in the ways to carry our tech goods when heading out around town. In Japan, there’s a group that’s working towards an alternative to the humble bag, and they’ve come up with an innovative parka that has all the room and durability needed to let us say goodbye to PC bags forever!

▼ The “Packable Parka” is designed for laptop storage, with a main zippered section on the front that includes smaller pockets inside to keep all sorts of stationery and equipment firmly in place.

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While the clothing is ready to be worn and filled up to go, the parka can also be folded up into a bag for times when it’s not being worn, allowing users to revert to the traditional bag-style carrying method at any time. To see how the product transforms from bag to parka, check out the short video below:

The Packable Parka design is also being used for a number of other garments designed to hold lighter materials like stationery and notebooks. To see all the designs in the range, check out the group’s campaign page on Japanese crowdfunding site Makuake.

Their idea to combine storage with clothing is proving to be so popular, they’ve already surpassed their funding goal of 500,000 yen (US$4898) with 24 days remaining on their project!

Toyota will finally resurrect the Supra in 2018

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HYPEBEAST/DesignBoom (by T.S. Fox):

Originally released as a Celica offshoot with 2000GT roots back in 1978, the Supra grew to become one of Toyota’s most beloved vehicles before it was unceremoniously discontinued back in 2002. Thankfully, Toyota righted that wrong in 2014, taking to the Detroit Auto Show to showcase the FT-1 — a Calty Design Research-crafted spiritual successor of sorts to the old fastback coupe and one that fans hoped signaled a sign of things to come for the much loved front-engine, rear-wheel drive setup. Now it looks like those Supra hopes may become a reality: Toyota has confirmed that it’s resurrecting the car for a return in just a few short years.

Said to build upon the aforementioned FT-1, the brand new Supra will be positioned above the 86 in the manufacturer’s lineup and will likely be decidedly more complex, powerful and high-tech than the rebadged Scion FR-S. And if the FT-1′s design language is any indication, the new and improved Supra will come with an aggressive, track-inspired exterior marked by airflow management systems and aerodynamic curves; it may even employ the FT-1′s sleek retractable rear wing for added downforce.

Stay tuned for updates on the Supra’s welcome return and mark your calendars: the fan-favorite Toyota returns to the road in 2018.

Universities plan to build android of Japanese literary great Soseki Natsume

RocketNews 24:

Soseki Natsume: writer, a man long dead. We can rebuild him. We have the technology. We can make him better than he was: better, stronger, faster…

With 2016 marking the 100th anniversary of his death and next year celebrating his 150th birthday, this is perhaps an appropriate time to honor one of Japan’s greatest writers, Soseki Natsume. And what better way to pay tribute to the author of classics such as Kokoro and I Am a Cat than by making a robot of him?

That’s exactly what the Nishogakusha University Graduate School is planning. In 1881, a young Natsume was enrolled there and heavily influenced by their teachings of Chinese poetry and Confucianism. And to celebrate the institution’s 140th anniversary they are hoping for his return, only this time as “Soseki Android.”

First, a team of students at Nishogakusha will conduct in-depth research into Natsume’s life, revisiting not only his extensive written works and life story but also gathering information about his physical appearance and size for an accurate android. To help out, major newspaper Asahi Shimbun has agreed to allow them access to their large collection of photos and works of their former employee Soseki Natsume.

▼ Old-timers in Japan may remember Natsume as the guy on the 1,000 yen bill 

Once the necessary information has been gathered, a team at the Osaka University Graduate School of Engineering Science will take on the challenge of building Soseki Android with the assistance of robotics company A-Lab, who made headlines with their Asuna android last year.

The sound of Soseki Android will be extracted from samples of his grandson Fusanosuke Natsume’s voice.

When the robot is complete, they hope to program him to give lectures at universities, high schools, and junior high schools. Understandably, a robotic Soseki Natsume might be a little too intense for elementary school kids.

The aim is to breathe life into his works by allowing the students to witness Soseki Natsume reading and discussing them first-hand. It is hoped this will inspire them to read and write more, improving their language skills.

Google’s homepage honors the legendary Japanese American activist Yuri Kochiyama on her 95th birthday.

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In honor of Yuri Kochiyama‘s 95th birthday on May 19th, the Google homepage dedicated a Google Doodle to the legendary late activist, educator and humanitarian, who died in 2014.

The doodle, by artist Alyssa Winans, features an iconic image of Kochiyama at the center of one of many protests and rallies, for numerous social and political movements, over a lifetime in the fight for justice.

It’s with great pleasure that Google celebrates Yuri Kochiyama, an Asian American activist who dedicated her life to the fight for human rights and against racism and injustice. Born in California, Kochiyama spent her early twenties in a Japanese American internment camp in Arkansas during WWII. She and her family would later move to Harlem, where she became deeply involved in African American, Latino, and Asian American liberation and empowerment movements. Today’s doodle by Alyssa Winans features Kochiyama taking a stand at one of her many protests and rallies.

Kochiyama left a legacy of advocacy: for peace, U.S. political prisoners, nuclear disarmament, and reparations for Japanese Americans interned during the war. She was known for her tireless intensity and compassion, and remained committed to speaking out, consciousness-raising, and taking action until her death in 2014.

 

New gaming chair aims to be the ultimate in comfort for Japanese players

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RocketNews 24 (by Cara Clegg):

Japanese company Bauhutte has recently launched a new range of gaming chairs specifically aimed at gamers who are typically in front of their computers for long periods of time. Available in three colors and designed in the image of a car seat or cockpit to bring more realism to your gaming experience, the stable frame will support your posture for long hours at your terminal or in front of your giant TV.

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It features reclining and rocking functions and easy and convenient adjustment of angle and height. With the simple pull of lever you can set it to your desired angle or even recline it all the way back for a comfortable sleeping position that reportedly feels just like being in a hammock, perfect for taking breaks between games.

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Simple but impactful color coordination and solid and unique stitch lines aim to evoke a “near-future” design.

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Made with 100 percent polyester fabric, the seat offers comfortable support for your shoulders and back, and arm rests can be easily moved to facilitate gaming with either a keyboard and mouse or controller.

The chair went on sale in Japan this month for 34,000 yen (US$308) plus tax.

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Source & images: Bauhutte