Keanu Reeves tries to be a tourist in Akihabara, gets mobbed by fans instead

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RocketNews 24:

You might think that after Keanu Reeves’ 2013 movie 47 Ronin – very loosely based on the Japanese story Chūshingura – became the second biggest box office bomb ever, Japanese people’s opinion on the actor would go down a little bit.

Well, you’d be wrong! On February 11, Keanu Reeves was spotted just walking down the street in Akihabara like any other tourist, and he was instantly mobbed by fangirls and fanboys alike, each one clamoring for the best Keanu selfies that they could get.

The most probable reason given for Keanu Reeves’s visit to Akihabara is location scouting for his upcoming miniseries Rain, where he will play a Japanese-American war-veteran-turned-assassin. Why the studios thought it would be a good idea to cast him in another role where he plays someone half-Japanese after the abysmal failure of 47 Ronin is anyone’s guess.

But hey! Who cares? Oh my god look! It’s Keanu Reeves!

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“Maybe he came to Japan to avoid the paparazzi. How ironic.”
“He plays the role of an average guy in the street so well.”
“I think he’s just giving some fanservice.”
“His sneaking-skills have really deteriorated for him to be caught this easily.”
“Yeah, I’d definitely do a couple of double-takes if I saw him in the street.”
“Why is he playing all these half-Japanese roles? Do foreigners think he looks Asian?”
“Oh man, now I want to watch The Matrix again!”

If you’re in Tokyo and happen to get a “Keanu selfie” of your own, consider yourself lucky.

Rinko Kikuchi in ‘Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter’

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Audrey Magazine:

Rinko Kikuchi just keeps on going. After the release of mainstream action films such as Pacific Rim and 47 Ronin, Rinko Kikuchi took a break from all the fighting and robots to shoot films steeped in human drama and to record her first J-Pop album Kaigenrei under the name “Rinbjo.”

Earlier this year, Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter premiered in Sundance and received rave reviews for both the film and Rinko Kikuchi’s performance.

Synopsis from Sundance:

Kumiko lives in a cluttered, cramped apartment in Tokyo with her pet rabbit, Bunzo. She works as an office lady, robotically preparing tea and fetching dry cleaning for her nitpicky boss. But on her own time, she obsessively watches a well-known American film on a weathered VHS tape. Rewinding and fast-forwarding repeatedly, she meticulously maps out where a briefcase of castaway loot is buried within the fictional film. After hours of intense research—convinced that her destiny depends on finding the money—Kumiko heads to the United States and into the harsh Minnesota winter to search for it.

 

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter hits select theaters on March 13, 2015. In the meanwhile, Rinko Kikuchi is already nominated for Best Female Lead at the Independent Spirit Awards, which will air on February 21, 2015 on IFC.

Link

One-woman film staring Rinko Kikuchi (Babel, Pacific Rim, 47 Ronin) slated for Sundance Film Festival line-up

Kumiko First Look - Rinko Kikuchi

One of the many interesting films just announced as part of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival line-up is one called Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, starring Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi (Babel, The Brothers Bloom, Pacific Rim, 47 Ronin) and pretty much her alone (the cast lists no one else). The film, directed by actor-writer-filmmaker David Zellner, is about a Japanese girl who becomes “convinced that a satchel of money buried in a fictional film is, in fact, real.”

That film is actually Fargo, as you might have guessed, and it’s actually based on a real story from back in 2001 (read more on the girl here & here). We have some first look photos from Sundance to go along with the announcement (congrats!), so check them out below.

Here’s the first photos for Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, which kinda make this look like a Jarmusch film:

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter First Look

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter First Look

A lonely Japanese woman (Rinko Kikuchi) becomes convinced that a satchel of money buried and lost in a fictional film, is in fact, real. With a crudely drawn treasure map and limited preparation, she escapes her structured life in Tokyo and embarks on a foolhardy quest across the frozen tundra of Minnesota in search of her mythical fortune.

The film is directed by David Zellner, with a screenplay by David Zellner & Nathan Zellner. It’s set to premiere at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in January in the US Dramatic Competition category. We’ll be catching the premiere there. For more updates on Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, you can visit the film’s official website or find them on Facebook.

Check out this link:

One-woman film staring Rinko Kikuchi slated for Sundance Film Festival line-up

Link

For 47 Ronin, Keanu Reeves Said His Lines in English And Japanese

 

Kotaku.com:

For 47 Ronin, Keanu Reeves Said His Lines in English And Japanese

Did you know Keanu Reeves can speak Japanese? Okay, he can’t. But he certainly made an earnest effort with his latest movie. Most of which we probably won’t get to see.

Reeves is well known to be a hard working actor – say what you will about his acting quality, the man takes his preparation seriously. For his upcoming movie, 47 Ronin, a movie based on a Japanese legend, Reeves worked under a Japanese coach so he could perform his lines in Japanese as well as English.

For 47 Ronin, Keanu Reeves Said His Lines in English And Japanese

In the movie, there are scenes where Reeve’s character, Kai, speaks Japanese. But according him, by order of the director, Carl Erik Rinsch, there was a take filmed with Reeves speaking all of his lines in Japanese for each and every one of his scenes.

I recorded every scene with Japanese dialog according to the wishes of the director.” Reeves said in an interview with Kotaku sister site Kotaku Japan. “If the director wanted to, he could probably release a full Japanese version of the film.”

The Japanese actors went through the reverse process, filming their scenes in Japanese and then again in English. In separate interview with Kotaku Japan, Tadanobu Asano, who played the story’s antagonist, Kozukenosuke Kira, reflected on his experience and how it helped him get into character.

Doing a scene in [your native tongue], your expression changes and your emotions follow. So by trying once in Japanese and understanding the emotions I felt when saying my lines, I was able to act with my English lines.”

47 Ronin premiered in Japan last week and the box office numbers for its first two days were a disappointing ¥105,248,200 (US$1,023,643). Hopefully it will fare better in the US when it premieres on the 25th.

Check out this link:

For 47 Ronin, Keanu Reeves Said His Lines in English And Japanese

Video

47 Ronin official trailer (feat. Keanu Reeves and Rinko Kikuchi)

Here’s the official trailer to 47 Ronin. The film features Rinko Kikuchi (currently in Guillermo del Toro‘s giant robot/Kaiju summer blockbuster, Pacific Rim) and Keanu Reeves.

Looks visually spectacular, although there are definitely comments out there about Keanu serving as the “Great White Savior” in this flick…