Lexus teases “The Heart Racing Project”, the world’s first car with a heartbeat

Coming soon from Lexus is “The Heart Racing Project.”

Created in collaboration with international advertising agency M&C Saatchi, the project is billed as “the world’s first car with a heartbeat” and will see the conceptual take on the RC F reflecting the driver’s heartbeat thanks to the implementation of biometric technology; by using a heartbeat monitor and sensors attached to the driver, the car can display the pulsating pattern via its exterior paneling.

Check out the teaser above and look for “The Heart Racing Project” to be revealed this Friday, July 24.

China bans puns in media and ads

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Beyond Chinatown:

 

Last week, China’s State Administration for Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (国家广播电影电视总局 / 國家廣播電影電視總局) announced a policy that bans the use of wordplay in media and ads ostensibly to “popularize and standardize the use of the national common language, a heritage of Chinese traditional culture”.  Since Chinese languages, like Mandarin, have a rich linguistic tradition of wordplay based on homophonic puns that, unlike puns in English, are much more ubiquitous and always seem clever and never groan or eye-roll inducing, the edict at first glance seems to be more ridiculous than SAPPRFT’s ban on time travel in TV shows and movies.   It might not be entirely ill-conceived.

The Wall Street Journal’s China Real Time explains one example specifically cited by the Chinese version of the FCC as an “indiscriminate use” of language:

[T]he phrase “晋善晋美” was used in ads promoting tourism to Shanxi province, widely seen as the cradle of Chinese culture. The slogan — translated as “Shanxi, a land of splendors”–  was a pun on the Chinese saying, “尽善尽美,” which means perfection. The ads swapped out the character “尽” for a homonym, “晋,” a character often used to represent Shanxi.”

 

Shanxi Promotional Video:

 

The slogan was selected in December 2012 by the Shanxi Tourism Bureau after four months of competition and was heavily promoted on CCTV and other media outlets.  In July 2013, it was reported a fourth grade student mistook the tourism slogan for the idiom meaning “perfection”.

The clever phrase was deemed to “rape” the idiom and sullied Chinese culture.   This pun control can be seen as part of the Central Government’s efforts to promote standard Mandarin.

Many are sympathetic to the government’s concern about the irregular and inaccurate use of characters, especially among children, but find it at odds with linguistic appreciation and development.  Yi Ming (亦鸣 / 亦鳴), a contributor to China Art Newspaper (中国艺术报 / 中國藝術報), praises the slogan as a clever use of traditional culture for a commercial purpose and highlights the charm of Chinese characters.

Li Zhiqi (李志起) chairman of marketing group CBCT, linguistic innovation should be encouraged and new idioms created.  An editorial in Xinhua does not believe in a “one size fits all” prohibition.  The author calls for the SAPPRFT to “seriously listen to the reasonable opinions of language scholars and the public” and believes that people need to keep an open mind about language so that it can develop.

The rule naturally echoes efforts by the government to censor online taboo topics, names, and words which Chinese netizens often circumvent by slyly hiding behind puns.  For example, when the government censored the word “harmonious” (和谐 / 和諧, pronounced héxié) online because netizens began using it as a euphemism for censorship (which the government justifies in order to promote a “Socialist Harmonious Society“), “river crab” (河蟹 / 河蟹, pronounced héxiè) was used as a substitute.

Dissident artist Ai Weiwei later visualized the phrase in an installation and invited supporters to feast on river crabs to protest the government’s demolition of his Shanghai studio.

 

 

David Moser, academic director for CET Chinese studies at Beijing Capital Normal University, tells The Guardian, “It could just be a small group of people, or even one person, who are conservative, humorless, priggish and arbitrarily purist, so that everyone has to fall in line…But I wonder if this is not a preemptive move, an excuse to crack down for supposed ‘linguistic purity reasons’ on the cute language people use to crack jokes about the leadership or policies. It sounds too convenient.”

Alexander Wang x H&M 2014 Fall/Winter Advertisement

Image of Alexander Wang x H&M 2014 Fall/Winter Advertisement

 

Earlier this month we offered a closer look at the Alexander Wang x H&M 2014 fall/winter range. Now its official advertisement has surfaced which continues the line’s athletic-inspired motif. Fronted by football player Andy Carroll and kick boxer Rivaldino dos Santos, and shot by Mikael Jansson, the advertisement shows the two athletes posing in a heroic stance with streams of light hitting their chest.

We wanted to take certain elements of each sport and portray the ultimate warrior” says Wang on its art direction. We also get a preview of the collection where neoprene jerseys and shorts see tonal, color block treatment alongside a billowy ski jacket fitting for the cooler season.

Look for the Alexander Wang x H&M range to launch on November 6.

 

Image of Alexander Wang x H&M 2014 Fall/Winter Advertisement

 

 

 

Link

22 things you’ll only see in Hong Kong…

 

1. Streets that need to update their a pop-up blockers.

Streets that need to update their a pop-up blockers.

2. Bumper stickers for any occasion.

Bumper stickers for any occasion.

3. Monkeys having sex at bus stops.

Monkeys having sex at bus stops.

4. This fierce old man working it on the MTR.

This fierce old man working it on the MTR.

5. Brother Cream – Hong Kong’s most famous cat.

Brother Cream – Hong Kong’s most famous cat.

6. Some of the most creative custom license plates.

7. Elderly vibrator enthusiasts…

Elderly vibrator enthusiasts...

8. …selling sex toys next to McDonald’s.

…selling sex toys next to McDonald’s.

9. The other side of the globe on Facebook.

The other side of the globe on Facebook.

10. Fresh porn.

Fresh porn.

11. Dudes who bring their own office chairs onto the train.

12. The most technologically advanced taxis in the world.

The most technologically advanced taxis in the world.

13. People who don’t understand how umbrellas work. Or train doors.

People who don’t understand how umbrellas work. Or train doors.

14. Literal potheads.

Literal potheads.

15. Two young lovers in a tender embrace.

Two young lovers in a tender embrace.

16. Phubbers. And Phubber-scolding signs.

Phubbers. And Phubber-scolding signs.

17. The Buddha with the bionic arm.

The Buddha with the bionic arm.

18. Ah Meow – Hong Kong’s premiere cat cafe.

Ah Meow – Hong Kong’s premiere cat cafe.

19. Giant, inflatable piles of dog poop.

Giant, inflatable piles of dog poop.

20. This man advertising and enjoying baked goods.

This man advertising and enjoying baked goods.

21. People taking typhoons very seriously.

22 Things You'll Only See In Hong Kong

22. And of course, 7.1 million people all staring at their phones.

And of course, 7.1 million people all staring at their phones.

 

 

Check out this link:

 

22 things you’ll only see in Hong Kong

Video

“3D on the Rocks”: Beautiful Japanese whiskey campaign uses 3D milled ice sculptures created using a precision drill

3D on the Rocks” is a beautiful ad campaign created by Japanese ad house TBWA/Hakuhodo for Suntory Whiskey using 3D milled ice sculptures created using a precision drill, based on concepts originated from crowdsourced ideas.

 

http://3drocks.jp/en/gallery/chair/Ice Shark

Ice MermaidIce Guitar

Ice DavidIce Statue of Liberty Sculpture

Ice KinkakujiIce Sphinx

images via Suntory Whiskey/3D on the Rocks

via Spoon & Tamago

Link

Sony sells waterproof Walkman in bottles of water

Image of Sony Sells Waterproof Walkman in Bottles of Water

Originally unveiled back in January of 2013 as CES in Las Vegas, Sony‘s completely waterproof Walkman design has reentered the limelight thanks to the tech giant’s latest campaign with draftfcb. Highlighting its 100% waterproof design, the 4GB MP3 players can now be found in bottles of water in vending machines – thus repurposing the humble and ubiquitous machine for one of the more unique sales portals around. Said draftfcb’s Kevin Walker:

We needed to get it somewhere swimmers couldn’t ignore it – right where they needed it the most. So we hijacked something they’ll find in every fitness center the world over: vending machines. In order to do this, we placed the product in bottled water, something else every swimmer needs, and in doing so created the perfect product demonstration.

Check out this link:

Sony sells waterproof Walkman in bottles of water