Amazon Japan opens dedicated “Cat Store,” offers more than 26,000 items to pamper your feline with

amazon cat store top

RocketNews 24 (by Scott Wilson):

Never before have there been so many things for your cat to ignore, all under one roof.

If you’re the lucky enough to have a feline friend friend of your own, then chances are you want to make them as happy as they make you.

Which is why Amazon Japan recently opened up the “Cat Store” section of their site, to help cat owners find the perfect presents for their pets—ones that, hopefully, won’t be ignored or abandoned quite so quickly.

The “Cat Store” consists of over 26,000 of the highest-rated cat-related items out there, broken down into categories and sorted by user ratings so that you can be sure you’re buying something that your cat might *gasp!* actually use.

▼ Along with cat food, collars, toys, and litter boxes, there are “cool bed tents,” “stylish cat goods,” cat towers, “fun toys/scratching posts,” and more, so that your cat can be the most pampered on the block.

amazon cat store 01

Here’s just a sample of some of the most amazing items we’ve found so far at Amazon Japan’s “Cat Store” so far:

▼ A Cat Scratch Turntable

amazon cat store 04

amazon cat store 06

amazon cat store 07

amazon cat store 05

amazon cat store 03

amazon cat store 02

Unfortunately if you live outside of Japan, then you’re most likely going to have to pay a bit for international shipping from Amazon Japan’s “Cat Store.”

Japanese teen whose chalkboard art went viral gets an art commission before a high school diploma

CA 1

RocketNews24:

A while back, we took a look at an amazing piece of artwork by student and Twitter user Rena Rena. Almost finished with her last year of high school, Rena realized her opportunities to indulge in youthful abandon were about to become that much scarcer, so she grabbed a piece of chalk and drew an amazing scene of Frozen’s Elsa standing on a snowy mountaintop.

Two months later, it looks like Rena’s life has indeed become so busy that she has no time for such ambitious amateur chalkboard art projects. On the bright side, that’s because she’s now doing professional chalkboard art, having been commissioned to create the cover to the newest book from one of Japan’s most celebrated fantasy authors.

Even if you’re not an avid reader of Japanese literature, you may have some experience with the works of Miyuki Miyabe. A recipient of both the Naoki and Yamamoto Shugoro Prizes, the Tokyo native has had a handful of her works adapted to TV and film. Among her titles best known to Western audiences is Brave Story, a 2003 fantasy novel that served as the basis for an anime theatrical feature, manga, and video games.

Publisher Kadokawa is just about to release Miyabe’s newest book, The Castle of Kingdom Gone (Sugisarishi Okoku no Shiro in Japanese). Amazon Japan describes the novel as centered on a pair of middle school students who come across a mysterious sketching of an old castle, and discover they can enter its world by adding pictures of themselves to the drawing.

Between Miyabe’s renown and Kadokawa’s financial resources, they probably could have taken their pick of artists for the novel’s cover, and the pick they made was Rena.

View image on Twitter

As Rena revealed in this tweet, she’s landed a professional project even before leaving high school. While her Frozen fan art was lighting up social media, it caught the attention of Kadokawa’s executives, who decided “Her art would be perfect for Miyabe’s new book,” and approached the teen to formally offer her the position of cover artist.

▼ Kadokawa tweeted this side-by-side comparison of Rena’s inadvertent job application and the drawing she made for The Castle of Kingdom Gone.

 

View image on Twitter

And here’s how the final cover will look.

View image on Twitter

Amazon Japan is currently taking preorders here for the book, which is priced at 1,728 yen (US$15) and scheduled for release on April 24. Ordinarily, we’d say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but as for judging this cover itself, it’s an awesome piece of artwork, and perhaps just the first step in Rena’s budding artistic career.

Insanely huge [mecha] robot can be yours for a cool $1 Million on Amazon Japan

exoskeleton

Next Shark: 

If you had a million dollars, what’s the first thing you would buy? If you said, “a 5-ton, 13-foot-tall, 5 mph-capable, wearable robot,” then you’re not only ultra rad, you’re also in luck. On sale on Amazon Japan is the Kuratas, the invention of Kogoro Kurata, a Japanese blacksmith and founder of the robotics firm Suidobashi Heavy Industry.

Kurata has been refining giant, wearable robots for several years (think “Mobile Suit Gundam” or Mechwarrior), and so is now offering his namesake latest and greatest robot on the net for 120,000,000 yen ($1 million).

81j84ljYbmL._SL1200_

In order to operate the robot, the wearer must press a button and then climb inside its cockpit. Perhaps the coolest feature of the Kuratas showcased in years previous is its BB gatling gun, which can shoot 6,000 rounds per minute when triggered by the smile of its pilot — no word yet on whether the Kuratas being sold on Amazon has the feature.

Before you run off and buy the machine, be mindful of some caveats to the Kuratas being sold on Amazon Japan: it doesn’t come with arms, and most importantly, assembly IS required.

Want to buy a giant, rideable robot? Amazon Japan will sell you one

AK 1

RocketNews 24:

This year, my sister-in-law and nieces gave me an Amazon card for Christmas. The bookstore near my apartment in Yokohama doesn’t stock English-language books, so it’s an extremely thoughtful gift, but I haven’t actually visited Amazon’s site to pick out my new reading material, since I’m still in the middle of a lengthy novel I started during my recent flight from Tokyo to Los Angeles.

With a couple of hundred pages left to go, it might be a while before I actually use the card, and while I’m leaning towards a National Geographic subscription, I still haven’t ruled out the alternative of putting the card towards purchasing a giant robot, since Amazon Japan now sells those, too.

Suidobashi Heavy Industries describes itself as “an organization which aims to spread human ride robots. Terminal syntax stumble aside, they’re serious about the goal of producing and selling robots that can be controlled by human pilots, and the company has already begun manufacturing and selling its 3.8-meter (12.5-foot) tall KURATAS robot.

Still, some of you may feel uneasy dealing directly with the company, seeing as how giant robots are just as likely to be built by mad scientists as brilliant ones. Thankfully, the KURATAS is also sold by a reputable middleman, Amazon Japan.

AK 2

This is actually Amazon’s second time to offer the KURATAS, as it also briefly sold the robot in 2013. The most recently listed price was 120 million yen (US$1,008,000), but buyers who were dreaming of a mecha Christmas had the chance to snap one up at a discounted price of 98 million yen ($825,000) during Amazon’s Christmas sale.

AK 3

Even when ordering huge robots, though, it’s important to read the small print. The item offered through Amazon is a KURATAS starter kit, and as such, does not include the pair of arms the robot is sometimes photographed with.

AK 4

Nor does the starter kit come with the plastic rocker launcher or BB Gatling gun, which are collectively referred to in the above video as the robot’s “greatest feature.”

AK 5

Oddly enough, the KURATAS doesn’t qualify for free shipping, as Amazon charges an additional 350 yen ($3) for delivery. Gift wrapping is available, though, which will allow you to keep friends and family guessing as to whether you’ve bought them a rideable robot or a gigantic block of cheese right up to the moment when they tear the paper off.

AK 6

Sadly, the KURATAS starter kit is currently sold out, and Amazon hasn’t announced when it will be restocking it, although the item is still listed on the retailer’s website. A little extra wait might be for the best, though. While we’d like to believe that everyone who buys a KURATAS is planning to use it to help build a peaceful, utopian future filled with robots, we’re not entirely convinced a few customers aren’t planning to use theirs for a murderous rampage.

 

AK 7