Pokémon fan creates spectacular 3D hologram battle dome entirely from scratch

 

RocketNews 24 (by Scott Wilson):

Who hasn’t wished that they could have a Pokémon battle in real life? Nintendo 64 game   and its successors were fine and all, but they were basically just glorified Game Boy battles; we want to see Pokémon slamming into each other, breathing fire and ice, and maybe — just maybe — actually touching one ourselves.

And now thanks to Reddit user kennywdev, the world is one step closer to that dream

Kennywdev wanted to create a 3D game to move holograms around using QR codecards. However, what started out as a generic project suddenly got interesting when they decided to use Pokémon as the test subjects.

A fun animation covering the complete history of Japan in under 10 minutes

A fast and fun animation by Bill Wurtz covers the history of Japan in under 10 minutes. The animation covers the major events in the country’s history including its economic, governmental, and social developments.

“Sanjay’s Super Team” features Pixar’s first human protagonist of color

NBC News (by Frances Kai-Hwa Wang):

Pixar Animation Studio‘s first human protagonist of color made his debut on the big screen Thanksgiving week in “Sanjay’s Super Team,” directed by Pixar supervising animator and storyboard artist Sanjay Patel.

The short film opened for “The Good Dinosaur,” directed by Peter Sohn.

Patel told NBC News that, growing up, he felt embarrassed by his identity and tried to fit into mainstream American culture. But as an adult, he came to appreciate the richness of the culture his father was trying to pass on to him.

Sanjay’s Super Team” is a seven-minute short film inspired by Patel’s experiences growing up as the child of immigrants in a modest motel along Route 66. The titular Indian-American boy would rather be daydreaming about television superheroes than praying and doing puja with his father. However, the Hindu deities soon transform into a team of dazzling superheroes in the boy’s imagination, bringing him closer to understanding his immigrant father and his place in America.

Before this film, Patel’s father had not seen any of the movies Patel had worked on in his almost 20 years at Pixar, so the studio invited him to watch the film when it was completed. Patel told NBC News that his father was very moved — he was obviously proud of his son’s achievements but was particularly touched to see a film about their relationship.

Sanjay Patel, director of new Pixar short "Sanjay's Super Team".

Sanjay Patel, director of new Pixar short “Sanjay’s Super Team”

In addition to Patel’s work as an animator at Pixar, whose credits include “A Bug’s Life,” “Toy Story 3,” “Monsters, Inc.,” and “The Incredibles“, what drew Pixar’s attention to Patel’s developing storytelling skills was his work writing and illustrating children’s books like “Ganesha’s Sweet Tooth” and “Ramayana – Divine Loophole,” and his art exhibitions including “Deities, Demons, and Dudes with ‘Staches” at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco.

 

How anime ‘Yo-Kai Watch’ beat ‘Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ at the box office in Japan

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Japan Times (by Giovanni Fazio):

As 2015 came to a close, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” was the movie on everyone’s lips, with fans dressed up in costumes and camping out to buy tickets, and a social media presence bigger than the Jabba the Hutt. Yet, despite breaking all box-office records on its opening weekend in the United States, the new “Star Wars” ranked only No. 2 in Japan (with more than 800,000 viewers), beaten to the top spot by “Yo-Kai Watch the Movie 2: King Enma and the 5 Stories, Nyan!,” which had almost 1 million viewers. A week later, this cheap and chirpy big-screen version of a Japanese kids cartoon derived from a Nintendo game kicked Jedi butt again.

So, the story would seem to be that anime still rules the domestic box office. A quick look at Japan’s top-grossing films in 2015 reveals that six out of 10 were animated movies (three of which were domestic), and anime topped the box office for 20 individual weeks with films like “Big Hero 6″ and “Bakemono no Ko” (“The Boy and the Beast”) beating competition such as “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” and “Terminator: Genisys.”

Then again, opening weekend in Japan is still based on Saturday-Sunday figures. If the Friday opening revenue for “Star Wars” was included, the film would have beaten “Yokai Watch” by a good margin. The force finally prevailed and on week three of release, “Star Wars” is No. 1.

It’s worth noting though that despite the graying of Japan, cinemas are scoring best with films aimed squarely at the pre-teen market.

Netflix wants to produce original Bollywood and anime programming

Celebrity Cafe (by Tian DuBelko):

Netflix won’t be streaming live television or sports any time soon, but it is looking to expand its range of genres.

Appearing onstage with New York Times journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin at the DealBook conference on Tuesday, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said that the company would spend $5 billion next year on new original shows, reports the New York Times.

Hastings dismissed the idea that there is an oversaturation of viewing material, instead suggesting that was not nearly enough content for an ever-growing international audience.

As Netflix hopes to corner the international market with fresh, original content, it will look to produce high-quality shows in different genres, said Hastings. As it stands, analysts predict that Netflix could be churning out 40 new shows a year by 2018, notes Bloomberg.

We’re hopeful that we’ll, over time, make a great Bollywood show, make a great anime show,” Hastings said Tuesday.

Bollywood and anime are uncharted territories for Netflix. While these new shows may only be watched by a niche audience, they represent an effort by Netflix to reach every target audience possible around the world.

You go beyond the normal spectrum to get quality and you really stretch to the things that you can do. On-demand and the Internet really gives you that power,” Hastings said. “When you have incredible distribution, then you have to open the front end of the funnel to have incredible producers around the world.”