An axis for artistic and creative-types of the Asian persuasian… Redefining Otaku Culture.

Exhibit in Kyoto features collaboration of anime and 400-year-old Rinpa school of painting

 

sub1 のコピー

RocketNews 24 (by Kay):

This is what happens when you combine centuries-old traditional Japanese painting with modern anime, and we love it!

If you’re interested in traditional Japanese art, you may be familiar with the Rinpa school of painting, which has a history that can be traced all the way back to the 17th century. It so happens that this year marks the 400th anniversary since one of the school’s founders, Hon’ami Kōetsu, established an artistic community (geijutsumura) in the Takagamine area of Kyoto, and an exciting commemorative event titled the “Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit” is now going on in the very same city of Kyoto, courtesy of brilliant artwork produced by the anime/comic merchandise retailer CHARA-ANI.

But before we go on, here’s a little bit more background on Rinpa art. The Rinpa school, which has a heavy emphasis on painting but also includes other crafts such as ceramics and lacquerware as well as calligraphy, is thought to have been founded by Hon’ami Kōetsu and Tawaraya Sōtatsu around the early 17th century and later consolidated in the latter half of the century by the prominent artist brothers  Ogata Kōrin and Ogata Kenzan. The name Rinpa is actually a combination of the last syllable of Kōrin’s name and the word “pa” for school.

The school’s art style is known for its bold design compositions, use of silver and gold leaf in the background, and repeated use of recognizable patterns. While natural scenes including flowers and trees are often depicted, animals and people from folktales are also common subjects, like the deities depicted in the famous ”Wind and Thunder Gods” folding screens (Fūjin Raijin-zu) by Sōtatsu.

▼ The magnificent Wind and Thunder Gods folding screen by Sōtatsu:

Fujin

So, taking all of that into consideration, we think you’ll understand why we might be excited by the idea of a collaboration between anime and the Rinpa school, which has a history of producing such notable works of art. And what’s attracting particular attention in this “Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit” are the works featuring the long-loved characters created by the manga master Osamu Tezuka himself!

The glittering gold and silver, along with the texture of Japanese paper, have turned Tezuka’s characters into breathtaking, timeless works of art.

▼ Here’s Tezuka’s phoenix (Hi no Tori), a perfect subject for Rinpa-style art, depicted in brilliant gold.

sub4

sub1

▼ The father and son lion duo from Kimba the White Lion (Jungle Taitei) looks full of life in this piece.

sub2

sub3
In addition to the collaboration with Tezuka anime, you’ll also be able to see on display Rinpa-style art featuring the busy-as-ever Hello Kitty, as well as characters from Lucky Star (Raki☆Suta).

The best part is that you can actually order and purchase some of these illustrations at the exhibit, and they apparently have some stationery and smartphone accessories on sale as well.

The Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit will run at the Kyoto Loft department store in the Mina Kyoto shopping complex until January 17, 2016 (except for January 1, when Mina Kyoto will be closed). It could be a fun destination for art and anime fans who are in Kyoto for the new year!

Source: CHARA-ANI websitePR TIMES press release

The Genbi Shinkansen: Japan’s newest bullet train is the world’s fastest gallery, packed with contemporary art inside and out

GS 0

RocketNews 24 (by Casey Baseel):

From an engineering standpoint, Japan’s famed Shinkansen is already a work of art. Recently, though, the country’s bullet trains have been putting a renewed effort into their appearance, taking inspiration from centuries-old tradition and science-fiction anime.

The latest Shinkansen to be unveiled, though, incorporates design cues more modern than tatami reed floors yet not as futuristic as giant robots. Instead, it’s envisioned as a travelling gallery of contemporary art, allowing for what operator East Japan Railways calls “the world’s fastest art appreciation.”

A special train needs a special name, and the new Shinkansen has been christened Genbi, combining the kanji gen (), meaning “contemporary,” and bi (), “beauty.” The Genbi Shinkansen will run along the Joetsu Shinkansen line between Niigata and Echigo Yuzawa Stations in Niigata Prefecture.

▼ Fittingly, the kanji used in the Genbi Shinkansen’s logo are heavily stylized.

GS 1

Seven of the carriages will be used as art exhibition spaces, with different painters, sculptors, and visual creators represented in each. The contributing artists have been announced as Nao Matsumoto, Yusuke Komuta, Kentaro Kobuke, Naoki Ishikawa, Haruaka Kojin, and Brian Alfred.

GS 2

If you’d like your sense of taste to be stimulated along with your sight, there’s also a cafe. On the menu you’ll find sweets made with rice flour from Niigata’s prized (and pricy) Uonuma-grown Koshihikari rice and butter from dairies on Sadogashima Island.

GS 3

And it’s not like only passengers inside the train will have something pretty to look at, either. The non-windowed side of the Genbi Shinkansen’s exterior is covered with colorful photographs of Niigata’s Nagaoka Fireworks Festival, one of the largest in Japan, taken by photographer Mika Ninagawa.

GS 4

The Genbi Shinkansen goes into service next spring.

British-Indian sculptor Sir Anish Kapoor’s “Descension” exhibition at Galleria Continua (Italy)

French street artist Invader’s exhibition “Wipe Out: An Explosition of Invader in Hong Kong” at The Qube (Hong Kong)

Edo and Meiji era Japanese artwork now available for free download

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17

Attention all designers, artists, fashion enthusiasts and people who just appreciate some nice Japanese artwork: The Smithsonian Libraries should be your best friends.

Among their thousands of other free artwork and books, The Smithsonian Libraries and the Freer and Slacker Galleries, Smithsonian’s Museums of Asian Arts now offer free downloads of thousands of beautiful Japanese prints.

Haven’t you ever wanted the simple yet colorful and whimsical prints of Meiji era (1868-1912) artwork as a digital file on your computer? Yeah, we have too and we’re really excited about this cool find.

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17

The collection is in fact a series of monthly design magazines, entitled Shin-bijutsukai.They were released in 1902 to show various designs by famous artists of the day. Artists featured include the editor himself, Korin Furuya, and his predecessor, Kamisaka Sekka. Sekka is known for being one of the first to incorporate Western tastes, styles and methods into traditional Japanese-style works. Furuya carried on this new, modern Japanese style and helped spread it around the world.

▼ Can you see the Western influence?

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17.36.17

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17.40.46

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17.43.01

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 17

If you want digital access to the pictures above and hundreds more, head to The Smithsonian Libraries website. There are two volumes of Shin-bijutsukai and both can be downloaded in their entirety by clicking the links towards the bottom of the website here.

Be aware, the files are kind of big, so you might want to stick with computers, not smart phones for this one.

2015-04-18-10

If you’re more into traditional artwork, the Freer and Slacker Museums also offer countless free downloads of artwork from all over Asia here. In the Japan section, you can find Edo period woodblock prints from world-famous artists, such as Hokusai and Utagawa Hiroshige.

▼ “Wood-block Print of Two Fish with Floral Sprays and a Poetic Inscription” by Utagawa Hiroshige.

FS-6009_01

▼ “Merry Makers at Cherry Blossom Festival” by Yeisen

FS-6009_02

Sometimes staring at pictures in museums just isn’t enough; you want to get them from the wall and onto your computer. Now you can and what’s even better, is that they’re available for free. Thank you technology and thank you Smithsonian Library.

Mako Miyamoto’s “Speculative Hunting” exhibition at Gauntlet Gallery (San Francisco)

As Art Central and Art Basel descend upon Hong Kong next week, will it become Asia’s arts hub?

Screen Shot 2015-03-07 at 2.08.28 PM

The ‘Umbrella Man’ statue, shown here at a pro-democracy protest site in Hong Kong in October, is one example of locally produced art inspired by the city’s civic unrest.

Wall Street Journal (by Wei Gu): 

Once ridiculed as a cultural desert, Hong Kong is now a major destination on the global art circuit.

Next week alone the city will see two art fairs: A new fair, Art Central, debuts March 14-16, while Art Basel Hong Kong, the most important annual art event in Asia, will open March 13, featuring more than 230 galleries from 37 countries.

Buying and selling art fits perfectly with the city’s history as a trading center. But Hong Kong’s local art scene—the one in which local people actually make and enjoy art—has been slower to develop. The Occupy Central protests that paralyzed parts of the city for nearly three months last fall has given Hong Kong a creative boost.

The protests resulted in a number of dramatic images, including umbrellas that protesters used to fend off police pepper spray and the iconic 10-foot “Umbrella Man” sculpture. Before police dismantled the protest sites in December, there was a major effort to preserve the art that had been created.

Hong Kong Arts Center director Connie Lam says social tension is a nutrient for art making. Cosmin Costinas, executive director and curator of Para Site, a nonprofit art space in Hong Kong run by independent artists, agrees. “An active civil society with different ideas is a much more interesting place for diverse art to develop than a closed society where the king decides he wants to build a museum,” said Mr. Costinas.

The burst of creativity could transform Hong Kong from an art marketplace to an arts center akin to New York or Paris. Cities like these have thriving artists’ communities, famous museums, respected art schools and a wide range of galleries. Until recently the art scene in Hong Kong was dominated by high-end auctions and top international galleries, but that is changing with a new art museum under construction and a wave of new galleries.

Hong Kong is now the world’s third-largest art market by auction sales. The total number of galleries in the city has grown from about 10 before 2000 to more than 90 now, according to Hong Kong Art Galleries Association. Western dealers such as Gagosian, White Cube, and Ben Brown Fine Arts have opened galleries in Hong Kong in recent years.

People don’t pay taxes on art in the city, which gives it a huge advantage over nearly every other Asian city. Despite Hong Kong’s notoriously high rent and small spaces, selling paintings can be very profitable. Lehmann Maupin, a New York-based gallery, expected its Hong Kong gallery in the Central business district to break even in two years. It was profitable in the first year, said founder Rachel Lehmann.

Hong Kong has been recognized as the international Asian art hub,” said Adeline Ooi, Asia director for Art Basel. “Ten years ago it wasn’t the case, now it is very pronounced.”

Meanwhile, local interest in art has lagged behind. When Spring Workshop exhibited a work by top Chinese filmmaker Yang Fudong a few years ago, it had a hard time attracting visitors. The nonprofit art organization sent young women with hot chocolate into the street to bring in visitors, but they still couldn’t convince people to come see the art.

I am glad that we don’t have that problem anymore, it still makes me cry that we have these beautiful artworks but people don’t want to come to see,” said Ms. Brown, founder of Spring Workshop, located in Wong Chuk Hang, a former industrial town in Hong Kong. The gallery now regularly brings in 800 people a day for its shows.

One of the most memorable visitors, Ms. Brown recalls, was a 60-year old lady who showed up on a Tuesday with two friends wearing backpacks and sneakers. The woman said she had been reading about contemporary art and came to check out the arts space with her fellow retirees. Since then she has returned for several events. “Hong Kong is now ready for a lot more deeper engagement with culture,” said Ms. Brown.

The city has many students studying music and art—some schools even require students to play two musical instruments—but people treat art as something that isn’t accessible by ordinary people. Parents rarely take their children to museums—partly because hasn’t been much to see. M+, the visual-arts museum scheduled for completion in 2018 in the West Kowloon district, should help by giving the city a world-class exhibition space with an important collection.

As the global collecting world descends on Hong Kong next week, bringing with it art valued from hundreds to millions of dollars, it will give residents lots to be inspired by. Two local arts communities will hold their own events to draw in the visitors.

There is at least one show dedicated to the Occupy movement. Kacey Wong, a Hong Kong-born artist, will exhibit photographs in a show called Art of the Protest. For visitors who look closely at the city’s overpasses and sidewalks, stenciled images of umbrellas can still be spotted, the last remnants of the art created during the protests.

Screen Shot 2015-03-07 at 2.08.18 PM

A visitor looked at an art installation at last year’s Art Basel in Hong Kong.