BBC: David Bowie’s love affair with Japanese style

A man walks past a 3D wall portrait of British musician David Bowie, created by Australian street artist James Cochran, also known as Jimmy C, in Brixton, South London, on 19 June 2013. The artwork is based on the iconic cover for Bowies 1973 album, Aladdin Sane.
The iconic Ziggy Stardust look has been immortalized in a piece of street art in Brixton

BBC:

David Bowie, who died this week, was a well-known Japanophile, adopting many elements of Japanese culture into his stage performances.

He was someone who knew how to express himself both with music and with fashion,” Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto told the BBC.

Someone like that may not be so rare these days, but he was one of the pioneers to do both.

Make-up artist Pierre La Roche prepares English singer David Bowie for a performance as Aladdin Sane, 1973. Bowie is wearing a costume by Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto.Yamamoto designed for Bowie through both his Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane eras

Mr Yamamoto, the creative force behind some of Bowie’s most iconic stage outfits, first got to know Bowie in the 1970s, when the singer was often visiting Japan, and trying to break into the US market.

I don’t know why he was so attracted to things Japanese, but perhaps it wasn’t so much Japan or Japanese-ness itself. He knew when he looked good in something.

“When you wear something and you look really good… you feel confident and good about yourself. I think my designs and costumes had that effect on him.”

Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto waves to the audience after his fashion event 'super energy !!' in Tokyo on June 12, 2015.
Kansai Yamamoto said his relationship with Bowie “went beyond nationalities, beyond gender”

Helene Thian, a fashion historian and lifelong fan who has written extensively about Bowie, agreed. She said Bowie had often been noted as having had “this beautiful androgynous face and body, which suited Kansai Yamamoto’s unisex style”.

‘Shapeshifting’ androgyny

Bowie’s Japanese style had already been developing through his interest in Japanese theatre.

In the mid-1960s, he studied dance with Lindsay Kemp, a British performance and mime artist who was heavily influenced by the traditional kabuki style, with its exaggerated gestures, elaborate costumes, striking make-up, and “onnagata” actors – men playing female roles.

Lindsay Kemp performs in 1974
Lindsay Kemp, performing here in 1974, had been influenced by the intensely stylized productions of Japanese traditional theatre
20th October 1981: Ennosuke Ichikawa, Japan's most distinguished exponent of the three hundred year old art form, Kabuki. Ichikawa prepares his costume and make up before leading a prestigious cast at Sadler's Wells.The dramatic makeup used by kabuki became part of the Ziggy Stardust look

Bowie was a natural “shapeshifter“, says Ms Thian, and his training with Kemp and onnagata style helped him as he explored ideas of masculinity, exoticism and alienation.

He even learned from famed onnagata Tamasaburo Bando how to apply traditional kabuki make-up – its bold highlighted features on a white background are evident in the lightning bolt across the Ziggy face.

It wasn’t trying to be literal interpretation” of onnagata, said Ms Thian, “but rather inspired by its gender-bending androgyny. That’s what makes it so powerful, it’s more evocative.”

‘Quick change’ master

Mr Yamamoto said he wasn’t sure why he and Bowie had such an affinity, but that “something resonated between us, something that went beyond nationalities, beyond gender“.

Through his style and performances, he said, Bowie “broke one sexual taboo after another“.

What he did in terms of bridging the male-female gap continues to this day,” he said, including in the increasing acceptance of gay relationships in Japan.

Among his most famous outfits for Bowie was Space Samurai, a black, red and blue outfit adapting the hakama, a type of loose trousers which samurais wore and which are still worn by martial arts practitioners.

This picture taken on February 27, 2015 shows a costume created by Japanese fashion designer Kansai Yamamoto and used by David Bowie, during a press preview of an exhibition dedicated to the British singer at the Philarmonie in ParisYamamoto’s outlandish costumes became a central element of Bowie performances
An outfit worn by musician David Bowie is displayed at the 'David Bowie is' exhibition at the Victoria and Albert (V&A) museum in central London on 30 March 2013
The dramatic cape could be whipped away on stage mid-performance

He also sometimes wore a kimono-inspired cape with traditional Japanese characters on it which spell out his name phonetically, but also translate to “fiery vomiting and venting in a menacing manner“.

Ms Thian says Bowie was also “absolutely the first” Western artist to employ the hayagawari – literally “quick change” – technique from kabuki, says Ms Thian, with unseen stagehands ripping off the dramatic cape on stage to reveal another outfit.

David Bowie performs his final concert in 1973 as Ziggy Stardust at the Hammersmith Odeon, London. The concert later became known as the Retirement Gig
The kimono robe also influenced some of his fashion, such as this Ziggy outfit which is a shortened version with a classic Japanese print on it
A costume designed by Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto for David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust character is display at the Victoria and Albert museums' new major exhibition, 'British Design 1948-2012: Innovation In The Modern Age' on 28 March 2012 in London, England.
The elaborate clash of prints on this knitted bodysuit can also be seen as a reference to yakuza (organized crime syndicates) tattoo patterns, Helene Thian has written

‘A very beautiful man’

It wasn’t just his appearance – references to Japan are scattered through Bowie’s music – his 1977 album Heroes even features the track Moss Garden on which he plays a Japanese koto, a kind of zither.

These days, an artist in Bowie’s position might be accused of cultural appropriation – stealing another culture for his own purposes – but Ms Thian says it was never seen that way in Japan.

David Bowie performing in his 'Angel of Death' costume at a live recording for a Midnight Special TV show made at The Marquee Club in London to a specially invited audience of Bowie fanclub members in 1973
Bowie often wore androgynous or women’s clothing in his Ziggy Stardust phase

Bowie was born to be the ultimate diplomat and artiste,” she says.

He took his creativity and fused it with his impulses to meld East and West and come up with a healing of the world in this post-war period.

This was “a homage to Japanese culture and the Japanese loved it“, she said, as Bowie challenged the tendency of Western fashion at the time to lump all Asian styles together as “Orientalism“.

‘Eternal hero’

Indeed, Japan embraced Bowie back, and he remains an icon there, with his glam rock style influencing generations of bands and musicians.

Photo of Hotei Tomayasu playing with David Bowie onstage at the Nippon Budokan in Tokyo in 1996
Hotei shared with the BBC this photo of them playing onstage together at Bowie’s 1996 Tokyo gig

Renowned rock guitarist Hotei Tomayasu, best known outside Japan for composing the theme for Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill films, told the BBC: “[Bowie] is the one who truly changed my life. My eternal hero and inspiration.

Bowie is also known in Japan for his role as Maj Jack Celliers in the 1983 iconic film Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence, directed by the renowned Nagisa Oshima.

The film, set during World War Two in a Japanese camp for prisoners, pits Bowie’s character and another soldier against two Japanese officers, one of whom is played by the famous musician Ryuichi Sakamoto.

Tweet by Miu Sakamoto recalling her meeting with Bowie when she was a little girl, 11 January 2015

On Twitter, Sakamoto’s ex-wife Akiko Yano recalled how Bowie carried their young daughter – Miu – on his shoulders when the family visited the Roppongi neighborhood in Tokyo with Bowie in the 1980s.

Miu Sakamoto tweeted this picture of herself as a little girl shaking hands with the singer, saying she vaguely recalled meeting “a very beautiful man“.

(He is) no more. A world in which David is not living still feels totally unreal.

Asian Street Style: Interview with Joshua K. Lau, founder of retail giant YesStyle.com

founderYesAsia

 

Audrey Magazine:

We love Asian street trends, beauty styles and brands, but there was a point in time where accessibility was difficult.  While Asian dramas were circulating online through various sites and engaging a new international audience, fans craved to have tangible products versus online downloads and streaming.  YesAsia was founded in 1998 when Joshua K. Lau and Priscilla Chu addressed the growing need of consumers interested in Asian entertainment goods along with the neologistic Hallyu wave that was flowing across Asia in the late 1990s.

As interest surged, so did the fascination with Asian clothing styles and brands being seen in that entertainment world.  As online retail reached new heights in the 2000s, YesAsia, again at the forefront, breached the barrier to Asian street fashion by launching YesStyle in 2006.  Those coveted looks could suddenly be easily searched and bought through the e-commerce giant.

From financial analyst to founder and CEO, Stanford University graduate Joshua K. Lau shares with us a bit of the history regarding the expansion into Asian fashion with YesStyle and future aspirations for this sector of his company.

 

ktownnightmarketLA

 

Audrey Magazine: As the world’s largest online retailer for Asian fashion, what compelled or inspired you to create YesStyle?
Joshua K. Lau: We found that many people were interested in and eager to try out Asian fashion, and we’re always looking for ways to serve our customers. We thought that we could provide reliable service and a large selection of quality products to fill this need. We now carry fashion from South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan, and recently have begun carrying fashion from China.

AM: When did you first find an interest in fashion, particularly street wear and street styles, and e-commerce platforms?  
JKL: Our business started in 1998 as YesAsia.com, which sells Asian entertainment products online, so we’re familiar with e-commerce operations. Then in 2006, I noticed that my wife, Priscilla (who’s also a co-founder of the company), was buying clothing online. After that, we decided to launch YesStyle.com.

AM: What motivates you to keep building your company?

JKL: I love to see our ideas realized. On a daily basis, we come up with and implement new ideas to serve our customers and improve our business. It’s fun to watch it happen.

 

AM: Since the establishment of YesStyle.com in 2006, can you share with our readers some of the challenges that have emerged over the years and some of your favorite accomplishments?

JKL: It’s been a challenge for us to remain competitive while also making quality a priority, and I’m proud that we’ve been able to maintain that balance. We’ve seen competitors offer fashion at very low prices but with sub-standard quality, and we think it’s necessary to avoid that path.

 

AM: What do you feel are some of the pros and cons that social media advances have presented since the beginning of YesStyle?

JKL: Social media can help us tremendously. If we serve our customers well and they’re happy with YesStyle, they’ll tell their friends using social media. It’s happening much faster than a few years ago, so we make it a priority to ensure every customer is satisfied with the products and services from YesStyle. In the end, we hope that they’ll pass their good experience with YesStyle on to their friends. 

 

AM: What are your goals for the future of YesStyle, and how do you see your company changing in the next few years?
JKL: We’re always working to improve customer experience with YesStyle. For example, we recently launched a YesStyle App for mobile devices and will update it regularly. We’re also expanding our selection with Korean beauty items and lifestyle products. We want to become the place where people can find the most fashionable products from Asia without actually travelling there.

 

AM: Finally, when you do find time to relax, what are some of your favorite things to do?
JKL: I like spending time with my 7 year-old son. We play soccer and badminton, and also go hiking together.

 

akaDandocumentary

yesstyledress

fashion