Model suing after Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic’s ad turns into a cruel meme on, claims it ruined her life

Model Heidi Yeh posed for this image which was to be used in an ad campaign for a cosmetic surgery clinic. However, an internet user gave it a different caption and turned it into a meme which spread like wildfire

Daily Mail UK (by Siofra Brennan):

A model who starred in an advert for plastic surgery says her life has been ruined after her image was turned into a notorious internet meme that went global.

Heidi Yeh, from Taiwan, is suing the clinic for damages after she posed alongside a male model as the beautiful parents of three aesthetically-challenged children. Their features were digitally altered to make their eyes look small and their noses flat, and the original caption read: ‘The only thing you’ll ever have to worry about is how to explain it to the kids.’

However, the photo made its way onto the internet where it was turned into a meme with the caption, ‘Plastic Surgery: You can’t hide it forever.

In an emotional interview with the BBC’s Cindy Sui, Heidi said that losing control of the image has ruined her career and her personal life.

A boyfriend split up with her because of the constant embarrassing rumors about her, and she had to endure people gossiping about her in the street.

I’ve broken down many times crying and I haven’t been able to sleep,’ she confessed.

The biggest loss for me is I don’t want to be a model anymore. Just because I’m a model, people can hurt me like this and I can’t fight back. I just want to hide.

Heidi, who had previously modeled for fast food chain KFC and Japanese beauty brands, originally posed for the shoot back in 2012.

It was intended to be used as part of a campaign for a Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic.

Heidi insists that her modeling agency signed a contract with US-based international advertising agency J Walter Thompson (JWT), stating that the image would only be used by one clinic in Taiwan. The agreement also allegedly ensured that her photograph could only be reproduced in newspapers and magazines. However, JWT subsequently allowed another plastic surgery provider called Simple Beauty to use the image.

They also posted it on their Facebook page, and it quickly spread across the internet. The image was turned into various memes all poking fun at the people featured.

To make matters worse, a Chinese newspaper then used it to illustrate a fake story about a man who became suspicious about his wife’s looks after she gave birth to ugly children. He then discovered she’d had cosmetic surgery before they met and decided to sue her for deceiving him.

When I first heard about this from a friend, I thought it was just a one-off rumor,’ said Ms Yeh.

Then I realised the whole world was spreading it and in different languages. People actually thought it was real. Even my then-boyfriend’s friends would ask about it.

As well as the impact on her personal life, she said her modeling career went downhill because of her notoriety.

People refused to believe that I had never had plastic surgery,’ she said.

Clients would ask me if I was the woman in the picture. After this, I only got small roles in advertisements.’

She says she’s lost around $4million new Taiwan dollars – the equivalent of £80,000 or $150,000 US dollars – in earnings because of the meme. Despite repeated attempts by Heidi and her modeling agency, she only recently managed to get the clinic and JWT to remove the image from their websites.

She says they only acted after she made a threat to sue both companies at a press conference. Now, she’s pressing ahead with her claim and is demanding $5million new Taiwan dollars in damages. However she insists that money is not her priority, and that she just wants people to know the truth about the image.

A spokesperson for JWT told FEMAIL the campaign was created to ‘promote plastic surgery services in a humorous manner.

He said the company own all the rights to the photo including copyright, giving them full rights to edit, modify and use the image.

Our campaign was created for print publication in the Taiwan market. With technology, smart phone cameras and social media, however, even a print ad can go viral,’ he said.

We can’t anticipate what degree an impact it will have, how people will view it, and what they will do with it.’

But Heidi’s lawyer Chang Yu-chi said: ‘

We gave you the copyright and the right to edit it, but we didn’t give you the right to let another company use it, and to use it online.’

The son of China’s richest man reveals the truth behind why gaming is so popular in China

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Next Shark:

Wang Sicong, the son of China’s richest man, usually says exactly what is on his mind, except that in a frank interview with the BBC for their three-part documentary series about Chinese youth, he’s addressing a different, more controversial subject: China’s government.

In the interview for the first installment of the channel’s “Secrets of China,” Wang says that trying to escape the country’s system would be “suicide” and that “there is really no way of succeeding outside the system.”

Wang, who was educated in the UK, is the son of Wang Jianlian, the founder of Chinese retail, real estate and movie theater conglomerate Dalian Wanda. He has an estimated net worth of $25.9 billion.

When asked in the interview about how Chinese children grow up to be individuals despite the country’s strict government, the 27-year-old Wang, an avid gamer and the owner of e-sports team Invictus Gaming, said:

“The state chooses what’s mainstream, and you have to conform to that. If your ideals are not mainstream, then you’re wrong. But of course, everyone has their own ideas, so what they do is they put on a mask and they go forward in life with the mask. Why is online gaming becoming so popular in China? Because once you go online you can take off that mask and say whatever you really think instead of what is mainstream.”

Asked about China’s lack of freedom, Wang said:

“I think at some point you just accept it. That’s why you don’t see many people protesting in China, I suppose … because they realize — some point in time, some point in (their social) class — that even by protesting they can’t change much.”

Wang’s interview with the BBC can be watched in full below.

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BBC: The woman who woke up sounding Chinese

Three and a half years ago, 38-year-old Sarah Colwill was rushed to the hospital suffering from a severe migraine. When she woke up, she spoke with what can best be described as a “Chinese” accent. Colwill grew up in the English city of Plymouth, and has never been to China. I’m going to assume she hasn’t spent a lot of time with Chinese non-native English speakers with a similar accent. But this apparently how she speaks now.

Colwill has been diagnosed with a rare speech impediment called Foreign Accent Syndrome.

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Restaurant in China where all the food is prepared and served by robots

The Robot Restaurant in China’s Heilongjiang Province is a conventional restaurant in every sense, save the glaring exception that the food is prepared and served entirely by an army of 20 robots with just a modicum of human oversight.

The BBC just took a tour to see what it’s like. Cabinets are pre-loaded with the necessary raw ingredients, then a human presses the button that corresponds to the dish being prepared, and one of the four chef robots handle the rest. When the preparation is complete, one of the server-bots will take the food to the table. While the patrons eat their robo-fare, a singing robot provides entertainment.

Restaurant owner Liu Hasheng came up with the idea to use robots as a means of cutting down on cost, but don’t be fooled into thinking these are cheap devices. While they are certainly more affordable than human labor in the longer term, we learn via Amusing Planet that each of these robots costs between $31,500 and $47,000 up front.

Check out this BBC report to see them in action…

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BBC’s Sherlock a big hit in China thanks to blatant sexual tension between Watson and Holmes…

RocketNews 24:

 

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BBC Television’s Sherlock is, without a doubt, one of the best TV shows of the decade–nearly anyone who’s seen the contemporary re-imagining of the legendary Sir Connan Doyle character is bound to agree. From the mysteries themselves to any of the numerous brilliant aspects of the show, it can be a bit difficult to pin down exactly why it works so well.

Well, unless one you’re one of the many Chinese women totally enthralled with the sexual tension between Sherlock and Watson!

Sherlock‘s popularity is definitively global at this point–we’d bet that the show has fans in every continent, probably even Antarctica! Well, what else are the penguins going to do all winter? And China has its fair share of fans as well–but one of the core groups driving the show’s popularity in the county is the women who revel in the homoerotic undertones between the two main characters, the eponymous Sherlock Holmes and his assistant Dr. John Watson.

While Japan has only just recently finished airing the second season, China has already finished the broadcast of the third, which isn’t set to be seen in Japan until May. The popularity of the show in China has been so intense that it’s even gained the attention of the BBC.

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Like the “rumors” that have long circulated about Captain Kirk and Spock, many fans can’t help noticing the intensity of the relationship between Holmes and Watson, leading to a nearly unending supply of self-published slash fan fiction. “Slash,” for the more innocent of our readers, is fan fiction stories about two characters of the same sex romantically involved with each other–usually called BL, or Boys’ Love, in Japan.

In its native Britain, fans generally seem to love the show for the mysteries, [Spoilers]Sherlock’s apparent demise at the end of the second season enthralled fans as they tried to figure out he pulled it off. In China, however, many female fans welcomed the chance to see Watson’s expression of love for Holmes and delighted at the “couple’s” return in the third season.[/End spoilers]

▼This sums things up nicely…

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Of course, this also means that China–and, indeed, the rest of the world–has an abundance of self-published slash fiction featuring Holmes and Watson, Watson and Holmes, and a female-version of Holmes paired with Watson–a reversal of the American Sherlock Holmes show Elementary. Though we’re pretty sure the Elementary has never shown the characters as romantically or sexually involved–clearly they’re doing something wrong!

Of course, none of this has escaped the attention of the BBC or lead actor Benedict Cumberbatch, who discussed the prevalence of online slash fan fiction in the English-speaking world in an interview with MTV.

“[Martin Freeman said] ‘Hey, look at this Tumblr.’ And I said, ‘What? Tumblr? What?’ He knows more about it than I do and he was showing me some of them. Some of it is really racy, un-viewable even on MTV. It’s cool.”

We have to say that we really respect and admire his appreciation for the fans’ work. It seems like a very calm response to what could be a very awkward situation. After all, when was the least time legions of strangers drew pictures of you being intimate with…well, anyone? Probably never, unless you happen to be our Mr. Sato!

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All of this, though, has led some Chinese Internet commenters to believe that the BBC isspecifically catering to fans interested in the romance between Sherlock and Watson.

“The slash-fic-loving women are like royalty!”

“I can’t help thinking that they’re trying to appeal to women who love the Holmes-and-Watson slash fic.”

“No matter how many thousands or tens of thousands of times Holmes picks on Watson, the doctor sticks with him like a love-struck puppy. We’ve waited two years for new episodes, and the third season is guaranteed not to disappoint!”

Naturally, there are many types of fans the world over–and that includes in China as well. After all, the show tries to stay faithful to the original stories while masterfully adding in modern embellishments and gadgets. It captures the imagination of mystery fans, adventure fans, and old-school Sherlock Holmes fans! It just so happens that a large number of fans are also captivated by the not-so-subtle romance between the two fetching young men.

So if you’re looking for a bit of fanfic to hold you over until the next season, it’s only a short google search away whether you’re searching in Chinese or English!

Check out this link:

BBC’s Sherlock a big hit in China thanks to blatant sexual tension between Watson and Holmes…

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Sikh contribution to the Army honoured in Sandhurst event

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BBC: The historic contribution made by Sikh soldiers who fought for Britain has been marked by the Army at an event at the Royal Military Academy in Camberley, Surrey. Many thousands of Sikhs died fighting for the British Indian Army during both world wars.

Today is really about commemorating the Sikh contribution to the armed forces both today and in the past,” said Lt Col John Kendall, who organised the event at the Indian War Memorial room at Sandhurst. “It is a story of loyalty, courage and selfless commitment,” he said.

During the days of the British Empire, Sikh soldiers were highly regarded by British officers for their martial prowess, according to Dr Anthony Morton, curator of the Sandhurst collection.

Sikhs have played an important role in the British Army for 150 years,” he said. “In both world wars Sikh regiments fought for the British all over the world, even on the western front in the First World War and they distinguished themselves very well.

He said Sikh soldiers had won Victoria Crosses. However, it is a contribution which many Sikhs in the UK believe is largely unrecognised, which is why author Jay Singh Sohal believes events like this are important.

British Sikhs, third generation, fourth generation can take inspiration from the fact that their forebears fought for Great Britain,” he said.

Despite this long and distinguished martial tradition, there are only 265 Sikhs currently serving in the British Armed Services Army leaders hope by celebrating the military contribution of their ancestors, more will be encouraged to serve.

Lt Jagjit Singh Mahwara shares that view. He completed his officer training at Sandhurst three years ago and currently serves with the Royal Artillery. He thinks Sikhs may have misconceptions about the armed services.

Parents and children alike see the army as a war fighting machine,” he said. “But there is more – all work we do supporting civilian communities. People need to go out there and look at what we do in more depth.

Check out this link:

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Billionaire Boys Club x A Bathing Ape 2013 Capsule Collection

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Both Billionaire Boys Club and A Bathing Ape are definers of ‘fresh’, and when the two come together, the result is undeniable. Such is the case with the recently unveiled collaborative project between BBC and BAPE, released in continuing celebration of A Bathing Ape’s 20th anniversary.

The two brands come together to not only commemorate, but also celebrate their long-standing relationship – given Pharrell Williams and NIGO started Billionaire Boys Club in 2003. Accordingly, a series of shirts have been released with custom graphics that overlap BBC and BAPE’s intergalactic motifs. Look for the shirts to drop at Billionaire Boys Club in Tokyo and select A Bathing Ape retail locations.

Check out this link:

Billionaire Boys Club x A Bathing Ape 2013 Capsule Collection

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