The history of Cambodian-owned donut shops

donut 2
Audrey Magazine (by Ethel Navales):

You’re probably already aware that a large amount of independently-run donut shops in California are Cambodian-owned. What you may not know is that the donut shop industry is an integral part of the Cambodian immigration story.

In honor of National Donut Day, we decided to look into the history of hardworking, Cambodian donut shop owners:

donut

1) Finding a donut in Cambodia is harder than you think.
There may be donuts if you look hard, but if you thought you’d find streets lined with donut shops in Cambodia, you’re in for a let-down. While donuts are a large part of the Cambodian American culture, many can tell you that this is purely an American tradition. Allegedly, there is only one donut shop in all of Phnom PenhCambodia.

donut 4

2) It all began with a man named Ted Ngoy.
Before donut shops were associated with the Cambodian American culture, there was Ted Ngoy paving the way. He arrived in the U.S. in 1975 and two years later, he began his own donut shop. Clearly, his legacy continued.

Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 3.46.29 PM

3) “The American Dream” 
Ngoy is the one who found a way for Cambodian immigrants to become part of the American dream of owning their own business,” said Dennis Wong of the Asian Business Association. “Taking a loan from an Asian loaning society, Ngoy was able to buy two stores, operate them for awhile and then sell to someone in the community or a family member who wanted to buy them. That’s how they got into it.

donut 5

4) Running a donut shop is hard work. 
You’ll often hear about these donut shops having only a few workers in order to save money. In fact, many of the workers are family members who must find time within their day to help the family business. As a result, many owners will work long and tiring hours to make sure their shop is functional. Additionally, many donut shop owners have voiced that the long hours have made it difficult to assimilate into a new society.

donut 6

5) They have thrived. 
An estimated 80% of donut shops in the Los Angeles area are owned by Cambodian Americans. In Houston, Texas, the percentage is an even larger 90%.

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Cambodian-American Rady Mom’s House win makes history in Massachusetts

Angry Asian Man:

Some historic election news out of Massachusetts: On Tuesday in Lowell, Rady Mom was elected the city’s newest state representative, and became the first Cambodian American state legislator in the nation.

Mom, a 45-year-old accupressure therapist who moved to the United States from Cambodia at age 12, defeated Fred Bahou to claim the 18th Middlesex House District, winning more than 61 percent of the vote.

Mom received strong backing from Lowell’s Cambodian American voters, and inspired community members to become more active in local politics:

 

Many in the city’s Cambodian community have said they’ve been energized by his campaign, becoming more active in local politics than they would normally be.

Mom, who is soft-spoken, could barely be heard above the din of the room. He gave his victory speech shortly after 9 p.m.

“This is history. This is just the beginning,” he said, but some still struggled to hear him.

“Speak up, representative. Speak up,” new colleague, state Rep. Tom Golden of Lowell, yelled from one side of the room. The crowd erupted.

Lowell is home to the country’s second largest Cambodian American population. Mom’s victory makes him the city’s first new representative in 15 years. Not bad for a kid who spoke zero English when he came to America. Here’s hoping that he is the first of many political leaders stepping up from his community.
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Link

The history of Cambodian-owned donut shops

 

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Audrey:

You’re probably already aware that a large amount of independently-run donut shops in California are Cambodian-owned. What you may not know is that the donut shop industry is an integral part of the Cambodian immigration story.

In honor of National Donut day, we decided to look into the history of hardworking, Cambodian donut shop owners:

 

donut
1) You won’t find a donut in Cambodia.

Well, you can probably find a few donuts, but if you thought you’d find streets lined with donut shops in Cambodia, you’re in for a let-down. While donuts are a large part of the Cambodian American culture, many can tell you that this is purely an American tradition. Allegedly, there is only one donut shop in all of Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

donut 4
2) It all began with a man named Ted Ngoy.

Before donut shops were associated with the Cambodian American culture, there was Ted Ngoy paving the way. He arrived in the U.S. in 1975 and two years later, he begun his own donut shop. Clearly, his legacy continued.

 

Screen Shot 2014-06-06 at 3.46.29 PM
3) “The American Dream” 

Ngoy is the one who found a way for Cambodian immigrants to become part of the American dream of owning their own business,” said Dennis Wong of the Asian Business Association. “Taking a loan from an Asian loaning society, Ngoy was able to buy two stores, operate them for awhile and then sell to someone in the community or a family member who wanted to buy them. That’s how they got into it.

Italian immigrants are often working with restaurants, Indians with newsstands and hotels. With Cambodians, it happens to be donuts,” he said.

 

donut 5
4) Running a donut shop is hard work. 

You’ll often hear about these donut shops having only a few workers in order to save money. In fact, many of the workers are family members who must find time within their day to help the family business. As a result, many owners will work long and tiring hours to make sure their shop is functional. Additionally, many donut shop owners have voiced that the long hours have made it difficult to assimilate into a new society.

 

donut 6
5) They have thrived. 

An estimated 80% of donut shops in the Los Angeles area are owned by Cambodian Americans. In Houston, Texas, the percentage is an even larger 90%.

 

Check out this link:

The history of Cambodian-owned donut shops

Link

All For One Festival presents world premiere of KNYUM by Cambodian American playwright and actor Vichet Chum

knyum01

KNYUM is playwright and actor Vichet Chum‘s performance piece about a character named Guy, an actor who works the graveyard shift at the Hotel East Houston in NYC. Between the hours of 11pm and 7am, the hotel lobby becomes the stage for Guy’s dreams and nightmares, where he encounters his parents’ stories of sacrifice as survivors of genocide in Cambodia.

KNYUM is largely drawn from Chum’s own experiences, and if you’re in New York City, you can catch it as part of the All For One Theater Festival, which runs for five weeks.

Check out this link:

All For One Festival presents world premiere of KNYUM by Cambodian American playwright and actor Vichet Chum