Toyota will finally resurrect the Supra in 2018

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HYPEBEAST/DesignBoom (by T.S. Fox):

Originally released as a Celica offshoot with 2000GT roots back in 1978, the Supra grew to become one of Toyota’s most beloved vehicles before it was unceremoniously discontinued back in 2002. Thankfully, Toyota righted that wrong in 2014, taking to the Detroit Auto Show to showcase the FT-1 — a Calty Design Research-crafted spiritual successor of sorts to the old fastback coupe and one that fans hoped signaled a sign of things to come for the much loved front-engine, rear-wheel drive setup. Now it looks like those Supra hopes may become a reality: Toyota has confirmed that it’s resurrecting the car for a return in just a few short years.

Said to build upon the aforementioned FT-1, the brand new Supra will be positioned above the 86 in the manufacturer’s lineup and will likely be decidedly more complex, powerful and high-tech than the rebadged Scion FR-S. And if the FT-1′s design language is any indication, the new and improved Supra will come with an aggressive, track-inspired exterior marked by airflow management systems and aerodynamic curves; it may even employ the FT-1′s sleek retractable rear wing for added downforce.

Stay tuned for updates on the Supra’s welcome return and mark your calendars: the fan-favorite Toyota returns to the road in 2018.

GoPro: The Streets of Japan in 4K

 

While it has traditionally reveled in its reputation as the premier maker of action cameras, GoPro is also eager to push the new 4K ultra-high definition capabilities of the newest HERO4 camera as a documentary tool. Cue this stunning look at the grittier, flashier side of Japan through its motorhead subculture, otherwise known as the Bōsōzoku, which literally translates as “violent speed tribe.”

While the Bōsōzoku were seen as a blemish on Japanese society in the ’80s and ’90s for their blatant violations of traffic laws, deafening mufflers and complete disregard for personal safety, their numbers have since declined, and this documentary explores what those former rebels without a cause have moved onto. Taking us on nighttime joyrides with gangs of decked-out Lamborghinis which provide a moving light show through the streets of Tokyo, the nine-minute film is narrated throughout by the musings of these larger-than-life personalities on car culture and Japanese society, who live a real-life version of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift on the daily.

Enjoy the short film above, and check out the rest of GoPro’s cinematic offerings on YouTube.

GoPro HERO4 Captures “The Adventure of Life” in Japan

 

While it has traditionally reveled in its reputation as the premier maker of action cameras, GoPro is also eager to push the new 4K ultra-high definition capabilities of the newest HERO4 camera as a documentary tool. Cue this stunning look at the grittier, flashier side of Japan through its motorhead subculture, otherwise known as the Bōsōzoku, which literally translates as “violent speed tribe.”

While the Bōsōzoku were seen as a blemish on Japanese society in the ’80s and ’90s for their blatant violations of traffic laws, deafening mufflers and complete disregard for personal safety, their numbers have since declined, and this documentary explores what those former rebels without a cause have moved onto. Taking us on nighttime joyrides with gangs of decked-out Lamborghinis which provide a moving light show through the streets of Tokyo, the nine-minute film is narrated throughout by the musings of these larger-than-life personalities on car culture and Japanese society, who live a real-life version of The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift on the daily.

Enjoy the short film above, and check out the rest of GoPro’s cinematic offerings on YouTube.

Link

10 things Japan does better than anywhere else, according to the international community

 

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RocketNews 24:

 

Advertising agency Dentsu recently released the results of its annual Japan Brand Survey, in which it asks people from around the world for their opinion on the country. This year’s study involved 3,600 men and women living in 17 different countries, whose responses were used to compile a list of 10 things they feel Japan does better than anywhere else in the world.

In carrying out the survey, Dentsu spoke with people living in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, the Philippines, the U.S., Brazil, the U.K., France, Germany, Italy, and Russia. All participants were between the ages of 20 and 59, with middle or upper-class incomes.

Roughly 80 percent of those questioned said they had either plans or a desire to visit Japan, a jump of more than seven percent from last year’s survey. When asked what intrigued them about Japan, the most common response was the country’s cuisine. Its numerous travel destinations, both urban and rural, came in second, and Japanese fashion rounded out the top three.

Being an advertising firm, though, Dentsu’s primary concern is with the perception of Japanese goods and services. To get a better grip on how people abroad feel about things stamped “made in Japan,” researchers asked participants what they felt Japan does better than anywhere else, resulting in the list below.

10. Video games

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It’s a sign of the times that Japan’s video game makers, who created and for years dominated the modern industry, only barely managed to crack the top 10. Still, even as overseas companies continue to make strides in the arenas of smartphone and social gaming, for some fans there’s just no substitute for a Japanese-made game.

 

9. Transportation infrastructure

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It’s telling that the list was compiled from responses from people who live outside Japan, and not in it. Residents have a number of valid complaints about the country’s narrow roads, expensive expressways, and difficult to find parking. If you’re a traveler though, or anyone else using public transportation in Japan, there’s a lot to be thankful for, as it’s hard to imagine the train and subway network being much more efficient or punctual than it already is (quibbles about service ending shortly after midnight notwithstanding).

 

8. Environmental engineering

7. Food

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No arguments here. While sushi was the dish most respondents reported eating, wanting to try, or just simply knowing about, Japanese food has a wealth of delicious dishes, ranging from subtle delicacies like tofu and lotus root to heartier fare such as ramen and the cabbage-and-pork-filled crepes called okonomiyaki.

 

6. 3D technology

5. Precision engineering

4. Cars/motorcycles

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Japan still may not be able to match Germany’s cachet in the luxury segment, and it’s facing ever-increasing pressure in the economy class from American and Korean manufacturers. That said, Japanese marques are still the go-to choice for many looking for reliably-made transportation, eco-friendly hybrid and electric vehicles, or a lightweight rear-wheel drive sports car.

 

3. Robotics

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Build a dancing robot like Honda’s ASIMO, earn a rep for robotics. Simple as that.

 

2. Anime/manga

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This one might be a bit of a linguistic technicality here. While in Japanese, the words anime and manga refer to cartoons and comics respectively, regardless of country of origin, among the international community, the terms generally refer to works made in Japan. For a lot of people, saying that Japan makes the best anime and manga is like saying Alaska produces the best Alaskan king crab.

Also, some fans are looking for completely different things from Japanese and non-Japanese animation. This makes the question of whether Japan produces “better” cartoons a tricky one to answer, sort of like asking, “Which is superior, a bicycle or an ocean freighter?” Sure, they’re both vehicles, but designed with completely different things in mind, and one isn’t really a substitute for the other.

Setting all that aside, though, if you want to see robots fighting, giant-eyed characters slowly falling in love, or some combination of the two, odds are the Japanese anime industry’s got you covered.

 

1. Audio/video electronics

Once again, Japan doesn’t have the same iron grip on this segment that it used to. Even as manufacturers from other countries offer alternatives with lower prices and passable quality, though, Japan still has the image of making some of the best-performing consumer electronics money can buy.

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Source: Niconico News

 

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10 things Japan does better than anywhere else, according to the international community

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2015 Lexus NX

 

Image of 2015 Lexus NX
Lexus has unveiled its all-new NX compact crossover automobile, strategically positioned to rival the BMW X1 and Mercedes-Benz GLA models. Seemingly inspired by the Lexus IS series, the bold design aesthetic is achieved via an array of sharp angles, the brand’s familiar spindle grille, a face lift at the headlights and LED taillights.
The interior sees clean lines throughout and features long stretches of luxurious leather, complemented with either metal or wood trims. Underneath the hood is an unprecedented 2.0-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine, which will be the first Lexus car equipped with a turbocharger. No word yet on the vehicle’s price point, however we understand that the 2015 Lexus NX delivery will include three models – 200t, 200t F Sport and NX 300h.
Check out this link:
Image of 2015 Lexus NX
Image of 2015 Lexus NX
Image of 2015 Lexus NX
Video

Modified Lamborghinis: Wangan Freeway, Tokyo

A group of crazy modified Lambos speeding on Tokyo‘s famous Wangan Freeway. We also meet the owners at Daikoko Futo and interview them about what they’ve done to each car. Love ’em or hate ’em, it’s certainly not something you’ll see every day!

Video

Vossen Wheels World Tour 2014 Makes Its First Stop in Japan

Wheel specialist Vossen Wheels recently kicked off the 2014 edition of its World Tour with a first stop in Japan. Taking to the streets of historical cities including Tokyo, Hamamatsu, Yokohama and Chiba, Vossen appeared at both the Tokyo Auto Salon as well as a slew of smaller outdoor gatherings with local Vossen owners and fans.

Creative director Anthony Anderson shared his thoughts on the trip: “It’s always amazing to see so many people united by their love for automotive culture. Despite the obvious language barrier, everyone remained connected by a common bond.”

To catch some scenes from the visit, check out the video above as well as get the full rundown at VossenWheels.com.