Michelle Krusiec cast in James Wan’s new “MacGyver” reboot pilot for CBS


Angry Asian Man:
Michelle Krusiec has been cast as a series regular in the CBS drama pilot MacGyver, executive producer James Wan‘s reimagining of the classic 1980s action/adventure series.

Krusiec will play a character named Agent Croix, who works for the Department of Homeland Security.

The original MacGyver, which ran for seven seasons on ABC, starred Richard Dean Anderson as a resourceful top agent for the Phoenix Foundation, who never carried a gun and drew on his genius scientific knowledge to thwart bad guys and get out of jams.

The new series, co-written by Paul Downs Colaizzo and Brett Mahoney and directed by David Von Ancken, centers around a twenty-something Angus MacGyver, who is recruited into a clandestine organization where he uses his knack for solving problems in unconventional ways to help prevent disasters from happening.

The pilot is produced by James Wan, alongside the original series’ creator Lee David Zlotoff and executive producer Henry Winkler, as well as Colaizzo, Mahoney, Ancken and Michael Clear.

Krusiec has upcoming recurring role on the CBS cop drama Hawaii Five-0, and can be seen in the indie feature The Invitation, which opens in limited theatrical release on April 8.

A first look at the new Rush Hour tv series on CBS

 
Angry Asian Man:
CBS recently released the first trailer for its upcoming Rush Hour TV series, based on the mega-popular Jackie Chan/Chris Tucker movie franchise of the same name. For the small screen adaptation, the one-hour action drama comedy stars Jon Foo and Justin Hires as by-the-book Hong Kong detective and a maverick LAPD detective who knock heads they they are forced to partner together.
CBS: “Detective Lee (Jon Foo) is a reserved, honorable master martial artist with lightning-fast moves who comes to L.A. to avenge his sister’s alleged death and learn more about her connection to a Chinese organized crime ring. Detective Carter (Justin Hires), on the other hand, is a wisecracking cop who plays by his own rules and has never wanted a partner. As exasperated as Carter’s boss, Captain Cole (Wendie Malick), gets with him, she knows he’s a brilliant detective who gets results. Attempting to help the two get along is Sergeant Didi Diaz (Aimee Garcia), Carter’s friend and former partner who doesn’t hesitate to call him out on his antics. But even as cultures clash and tempers flare, Carter and Lee can’t deny they make a formidable team, and grudgingly admit that sometimes an unlikely pairing makes for a great partnership.”

 Rush Hour is set for a mid-season premiere, so look for it on the airwaves in early 2016.

Jon Foo cast in Jackie Chan role in CBS’ TV adaptation of Rush Hour franchise

Deadline/ComingSoon.net/Angry Asian Man:

The 1998 Rush Hour movie helped make Hong Kong film star and martial arts wiz Jackie Chan a household name in America, jumpstarting a successful Hollywood career. Now CBS’ TV adaptation of the hit movie franchise is looking to do the same for Jon Foo, who has landed the Detective Lee role played in the movies by Chan.

Written/executive produced by Bill Lawrence and Blake McCormick and directed/exec produced by Jon Turteltaub, CBS’ Rush Hour pilot centers on Lee (Foo), a stoic, by-the-book Hong Kong police officer assigned to a case in Los Angeles, where he’s forced to work with a cocky black LAPD officer, Carter (originally played by Chris Tucker), who has no interest in a partner. A top detective with the Hong Kong police department, Detective Lee is a dedicated professional and master martial artist, a man of few words who knows how to get the job done.

The movies’ director Brett Ratner and producer Arthur Sarkissian also executive produce with Jeff Ingold for Warner Bros TV and Lawrence’s studio-based Doozer. Ratner directed three Rush Hour films between 1998 and 2007 with Chan headlining opposite Chris Tucker in all three. Combined, the three films grossed more than $850 at the worldwide box office.

Like Chan, British actor Foo, who is of Chinese and Irish descent, is a trained martial artist who has done stunt work and built a resume as an international action star. In the U.S., he is probably best known for his role in the 2010 feature Tekken.

Foo is trained in a variety of martial arts styles and is also well known for playing Ryu in the fan film Street Fighter: Legacy.

 

‘Rush Hour’ TV series in the works at CBS with pilot production commitment


Deadline: 

CBS is hitting Rush Hour traffic, landing the high-profile series adaptation of the blockbuster movie franchise with a pilot production commitment. The hourlong action comedy, written/executive produced by Bill Lawrence and Blake McCormick and executive produced by the movies’ director Brett Ratner and producer Arthur Sarkissian, was taken out to the broadcast networks this week by Warner Bros. TV.

CBS pursued it aggressively just as it recently did with another big WBTV package,Supergirl, which received a series commitment.

The show will stay close to the movies’ premise, which paired a by-the-book Hong Kong cop with a cocky black LAPD officer who want nothing to do with each other. I am fairly certain the movies’ original stars, Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker, will not have anything to do with the show.
Written by Cougar Town co-creator Lawrence and the series’ executive producer/showrunner McCormick, Rush Hour is staying close to the premise of the original movie, with a stoic, by-the-book Hong Kong police officer (played in the features by Jackie Chan) assigned to a case in Los Angeles, where he’s forced to work with a cocky black LAPD officer *originally played by Chris Tucker) who has no interest in a partner. WBTV and Lawrence’s studio-based Dooxer are producing, with Lawrence, McCormick, Sarkissian and Ratner exec producing alongside Doozer’s Jeff Ingold.
Link

Fall network TV shows star more Asian Americans

 

1

 

Asian Fortune News:

 

The number of Asian American actors on network television shows will increase this fall season. John Cho will star in ABC’s comedy “Selfie,” which is described as a modern version of “My Fair Lady.” On CBS, Kal Penn will appear in “Battle Creek,” a show about detectives working in a small town, and Maggie Q was cast in a new thriller entitled “Stalker.”

A new comedy show based on chef Eddie Huang’s memoir will be on ABC and is the first sitcom in two decades that focuses on an Asian American family. “Fresh Off The Boat” will star Randall Park and Constance Wu and features the culture shock 12-year-old Eddie experiences after moving to Orlando from D.C.’s Chinatown. In addition, CBS picked up “Scorpion,” which will be directed by Justin Lin, who is known for the “Fast and Furious” franchise.

 

Check out this link:

Fall network TV shows star more Asian Americans

Link

Asian American YouTube filmmaker Freddie Wong gets development deal with CBS

Video-Game-High-School

Never heard of the blockbuster film “Video Game High School“? You’re forgiven. The 2012 movie drew more than 40 million views in its first three months, but it didn’t play in theaters.

Instead, the film became a sensation on YouTube, where it was shown in nine chunks, each between 10 and 20 minutes long. And while that chopped-up approach may appall traditional filmmakers, it’s exactly how you launch and promote an online movie in a world where young people, eyes glued to their phones, would rather watch YouTube than almost anything on TV.
Hollywood has taken notice. Lions Gate (LGF) announced Monday that it’s partnering with RocketJump, the company behind “Video Game High School,” to create videos for film, TV and online viewing. Financial terms of the partnership were not released.
The news was a triumph for RocketJump’s founders, most notably Freddie Wong, who creates and stars in many of the company’s online shorts. It’s also one more sign of YouTube’s growing influence within the entertainment industry, which is panicked at the thought of blowing millions on big-budget flops like “After Earth” while an upstart online flick about video gaming becomes a hit with the kids.
RocketJump’s avid fans are exactly the market Lions Gate wants, too. This is the studio behind “The Hunger Games” and “Divergent” franchises, and “stood out as the one studio that really gets our brand,” Wong said in a release announcing the partnership.
While YouTube played a huge part in RocketJump’s success, Wong was able to draw viewers to his own website by releasing videos exclusively there for one week. As a result, he was able to make more money as well as sell shirts and other merchandise.
It’s hard to sell merchandise off YouTube,” Wong told TheWrap. “When you have a home and create a brand people believe in and want to support, it makes it easier for you to control merchandise and sell it.
Wong cultivated that brand carefully by releasing a wide variety of video shorts, from shooter-heavy action sequences to semi-romantic comedies. And Wong carefully built up the business end of RocketJump, with custom advertising, a loyal audience and a website to control distribution.
Is this the new Hollywood? Not exactly. Movie studios are still going to make the big money with tentpole hits like “The Avengers” series. But hooking up with YouTube creators like Wong gives Hollywood some much-needed diversification and one more way to reach younger audiences. If RocketJump can turn out a box-office sensation down the road — combined with a savvy Web presence, merchandising and cross-platform franchise potential — Lions Gate is paying up now for an early seat at the table.
Check out this link:
Creator Freddie Wong (R) and director/writer Matt Arnold attend the “Video Game High School” season two premiere party at YouTube Space LA on July 24, 2013, in Los Angeles.