A first look at the new Rush Hour tv series on CBS

 
Angry Asian Man:
CBS recently released the first trailer for its upcoming Rush Hour TV series, based on the mega-popular Jackie Chan/Chris Tucker movie franchise of the same name. For the small screen adaptation, the one-hour action drama comedy stars Jon Foo and Justin Hires as by-the-book Hong Kong detective and a maverick LAPD detective who knock heads they they are forced to partner together.
CBS: “Detective Lee (Jon Foo) is a reserved, honorable master martial artist with lightning-fast moves who comes to L.A. to avenge his sister’s alleged death and learn more about her connection to a Chinese organized crime ring. Detective Carter (Justin Hires), on the other hand, is a wisecracking cop who plays by his own rules and has never wanted a partner. As exasperated as Carter’s boss, Captain Cole (Wendie Malick), gets with him, she knows he’s a brilliant detective who gets results. Attempting to help the two get along is Sergeant Didi Diaz (Aimee Garcia), Carter’s friend and former partner who doesn’t hesitate to call him out on his antics. But even as cultures clash and tempers flare, Carter and Lee can’t deny they make a formidable team, and grudgingly admit that sometimes an unlikely pairing makes for a great partnership.”

 Rush Hour is set for a mid-season premiere, so look for it on the airwaves in early 2016.

Jon Foo cast in Jackie Chan role in CBS’ TV adaptation of Rush Hour franchise

Deadline/ComingSoon.net/Angry Asian Man:

The 1998 Rush Hour movie helped make Hong Kong film star and martial arts wiz Jackie Chan a household name in America, jumpstarting a successful Hollywood career. Now CBS’ TV adaptation of the hit movie franchise is looking to do the same for Jon Foo, who has landed the Detective Lee role played in the movies by Chan.

Written/executive produced by Bill Lawrence and Blake McCormick and directed/exec produced by Jon Turteltaub, CBS’ Rush Hour pilot centers on Lee (Foo), a stoic, by-the-book Hong Kong police officer assigned to a case in Los Angeles, where he’s forced to work with a cocky black LAPD officer, Carter (originally played by Chris Tucker), who has no interest in a partner. A top detective with the Hong Kong police department, Detective Lee is a dedicated professional and master martial artist, a man of few words who knows how to get the job done.

The movies’ director Brett Ratner and producer Arthur Sarkissian also executive produce with Jeff Ingold for Warner Bros TV and Lawrence’s studio-based Doozer. Ratner directed three Rush Hour films between 1998 and 2007 with Chan headlining opposite Chris Tucker in all three. Combined, the three films grossed more than $850 at the worldwide box office.

Like Chan, British actor Foo, who is of Chinese and Irish descent, is a trained martial artist who has done stunt work and built a resume as an international action star. In the U.S., he is probably best known for his role in the 2010 feature Tekken.

Foo is trained in a variety of martial arts styles and is also well known for playing Ryu in the fan film Street Fighter: Legacy.

 

‘Rush Hour’ TV series in the works at CBS with pilot production commitment


Deadline: 

CBS is hitting Rush Hour traffic, landing the high-profile series adaptation of the blockbuster movie franchise with a pilot production commitment. The hourlong action comedy, written/executive produced by Bill Lawrence and Blake McCormick and executive produced by the movies’ director Brett Ratner and producer Arthur Sarkissian, was taken out to the broadcast networks this week by Warner Bros. TV.

CBS pursued it aggressively just as it recently did with another big WBTV package,Supergirl, which received a series commitment.

The show will stay close to the movies’ premise, which paired a by-the-book Hong Kong cop with a cocky black LAPD officer who want nothing to do with each other. I am fairly certain the movies’ original stars, Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker, will not have anything to do with the show.
Written by Cougar Town co-creator Lawrence and the series’ executive producer/showrunner McCormick, Rush Hour is staying close to the premise of the original movie, with a stoic, by-the-book Hong Kong police officer (played in the features by Jackie Chan) assigned to a case in Los Angeles, where he’s forced to work with a cocky black LAPD officer *originally played by Chris Tucker) who has no interest in a partner. WBTV and Lawrence’s studio-based Dooxer are producing, with Lawrence, McCormick, Sarkissian and Ratner exec producing alongside Doozer’s Jeff Ingold.