Asian remedies that will cure your hangover

 

Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup

Audrey Magazine (by Jianne Lasaten):

Sure, Asian glow is one thing to worry about, but what about those nights when things go a bit too far and you end up taking one (or five) more shots than intended? Hopefully you got home safe and sound (that’s what’s most important, after all).

But when you wake up the next day, you have to face an immediate problem. When the world is still spinning and you feel too nauseous to move, you know you’ve been hit with the dreaded hangover. For my friends and I, a comforting bowl of pho usually does the trick. But what helps everyone else?

Buzzfeed shared their list of interesting traditional hangover remedies from around the world. Below, we bring you the hangover cures, Asian style! We have to warn you though, you may have to be a brave one to try a few of these…

Philippines: Balut and Rice

Hangover_ModernFarmer

Ah, yes. The signature “weird” delicacy of the Philippines is also a well-known hangover cure. According to the Travel Channel, balut, which is a developing duck embryo, contains cysteine– a substance that breaks down alcoholic toxins in the liver.

 

China: Congee

Hangover_Safarinewsegnet

This rice porridge contains ginger, garlic and scallions. All three ingredients combined should help ease those headaches.

 

Japan: Umeboshi

Hangover_TokyoTerrace

Umeboshi is a pickled sour plum that is well-known for its health benefits. It contains natural bacteria, enzymes, organic acids and alkaline. These help eliminate excessive acidity in the body.

 

Mongolia: Picked Sheep Eye in Tomato Juice

Hangover_ViralNova

Commonly known as the “Mongolian Mary,” this beverage is not for the faint of heart. Tomato juice contains simple sugars to boost your glucose levels back up as well as re-hydrate you after a night of drinking. The significance of the sheep eye? Well, that’s still a mystery.

 

South Korea: Haejangguk

Hangover_SeriousEats

South Korea definitely came prepared because Haejangguk literally translates into “soup to cure a hangover.” Although the recipe differs in every region, this spicy beef broth usually contains pork, spinach, cabbage, onions and congealed ox blood.

 

Indonesia: Kaya Toast

Courtesy of latimes.com

This traditional Indonesian breakfast will satisfy all of your sweet and salty hangover cravings (ladies, this would probably be just as helpful for that time of month). Warm toasted bread slices are served with salted butter and Kaya Jam, a sweet mixture of coconut milk, sugar, eggs, and pandan.

 

Bangladesh: Coconut Water

Hangover_BlogdotCoxAndKings

We can’t argue with this one. Coconut water is known to have a significant amount of potassium and will keep you hydrated.

 

Thailand: Pad Kee Mao

lif_03ThaiSpiceKitchen072513

Nicknamed “drunken noodles,” this spicy dish is said to be a favorite among Thai men after a night of drinking. It usually consists of wide rice noodles, ground beef (or other meat), basil and other spices, onions and bell peppers.

Link

Thai Chili-infused coconut water?

IMG_8284

The latest trend within the trend that is coconut water? “Real Coconut Water with Thai Chili Extract” fuses the hydrating goodness of coconut water with Thai bird’s eye chilis. Here’s a review on FoodBeast:

When we first heard about the stuff earlier this month, we imagined it might taste something like ginger-infused lemonade, with just a subtle spiciness that cuts nicely through the sometimes cloying taste you get with a lot of coconut waters. And if it were based just on the nose, that’s exactly what you’d get — spice, lots of it. Unfortunately, taste is where our not-so-spicy friend falls short.

The drink itself packs hardly any heat, but what little flavor the chilies do add combines with the coconut water strangely. Let’s just call it “savory-adjacent.” It’s interesting for sure, and would probably work for a sort of Thai-inspired cocktail, or add a tiny kick to a mild soup, but it definitely isn’t anything we’d want to drink on its own.

Check out this link:

Thai Chili-infused coconut water?

IMG_8278