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Elizabeth Ho to star in NBC comedy pilot

 


Deadline Hollywood/Angry Asian Man:

Elizabeth Ho has been cast as one of the leads in an untitled NBC comedy pilot from 30 Rock co-executive producer Matt Hubbard and Parks & Recreation and Brooklyn Nine-Nine co-creator/ executive producer Mike Schur.

The single-camera project revolves around Andrew (Smith) and Josie (Ho), a happily married interracial couple whose lives take a turn when they move close to Josie’s family in Missouri. Andrew is a likable nerd, a lawyer, while Josie is hard-charging woman who has never failed at anything.

Hubbard wrote the project, loosely based on his life, and executive produces with Schur and 3 Arts’ David Miner.

Ho’s series credits include Rake and Melissa & Joey.

Angela Ho Chris Smith

Hudson Yang of ‘Fresh Off the Boat’ and Aziz Ansari’s ‘Master of None’ nominated for NAACP Image Awards

NBC:

ABC‘s “Fresh Off the Boat” is loosely inspired by celebrity chef Eddie Huang‘s memoir of the same name and stars Hudson Yang as a young Huang, as well as Randall Park as his father, Louis, and Constance Wu as his mother, Jessica. Wu has been nominated for her role in “Fresh Off the Boat” in both the 2015 Critic’s Choice Television Awards and the Television Critics Association Awards.

On Dec. 1, “Fresh Off the Boat” released an in-character cast video and social media campaign under the hashtag #makeitrightFOTB lobbying for a Golden Globe nomination.

Among the nominees for the 47th annual NAACP Image Awards is “Master of None,” Aziz Ansari‘s Netflix series released earlier this fall. Co-creators Ansari and Alan Yang received a nomination for their writing of “Parents,” the second episode of the series, and Ansari was nominated for Outstanding Director for the same episode.

Kelvin Yu (left) talks with Aziz Ansari (right) in a scene in Netflix’s “Master of None.” 

“Parents” deals with second-generation main characters Dev, portrayed by Ansari, and Brian, portrayed by Kelvin Yu, thanking their first-generation parents for sacrifices made during their parents’ journeys to the United States. The pair take their parents out to dinner where they learn about their parents’ youth and upbringing.

The 47th annual NAACP Image Awards is scheduled to take place on Feb. 5, 2016.

A first look at the new Rush Hour tv series on CBS

 
Angry Asian Man:
CBS recently released the first trailer for its upcoming Rush Hour TV series, based on the mega-popular Jackie Chan/Chris Tucker movie franchise of the same name. For the small screen adaptation, the one-hour action drama comedy stars Jon Foo and Justin Hires as by-the-book Hong Kong detective and a maverick LAPD detective who knock heads they they are forced to partner together.
CBS: “Detective Lee (Jon Foo) is a reserved, honorable master martial artist with lightning-fast moves who comes to L.A. to avenge his sister’s alleged death and learn more about her connection to a Chinese organized crime ring. Detective Carter (Justin Hires), on the other hand, is a wisecracking cop who plays by his own rules and has never wanted a partner. As exasperated as Carter’s boss, Captain Cole (Wendie Malick), gets with him, she knows he’s a brilliant detective who gets results. Attempting to help the two get along is Sergeant Didi Diaz (Aimee Garcia), Carter’s friend and former partner who doesn’t hesitate to call him out on his antics. But even as cultures clash and tempers flare, Carter and Lee can’t deny they make a formidable team, and grudgingly admit that sometimes an unlikely pairing makes for a great partnership.”

 Rush Hour is set for a mid-season premiere, so look for it on the airwaves in early 2016.

NY Post: Ken Jeong “totally vindicated” by the success of his show Dr. Ken

 

NY Post (by Robert Rorke and Andrea Morabito):

After first exposing himself to audiences as “The Hangover’s” naked gangster Leslie Chow, Ken Jeong is taking on a much more grounded character in “Dr. Ken,” loosely based on his own past as a physician. With the comedy now picked up for a full season, Jeong fielded questions from The Post about turning his life into TV.

“Dr. Ken” got panned by critics — do you feel vindicated, now that ratings have been good?
In a word, yes. I feel totally vindicated because all the reviews were based on a pilot script that was in gestation for a long time, and I knew that the subsequent series episodes are much better in quality and will sustain the show. After the pilot, I knew we had room for improvement, and during the 10 weeks of pre-production, I was in the writers’ room every day, ensuring we would improve every aspect of the show from the writing to the characters to the quality of storylines, and we succeeded.

Dr. Ken air on Fridays at 8:30 p.m. on ABC

Margaret Cho slams SNL for inviting Donald Trump to host

margaret

OUT.com: 

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump is set to host Saturday Night Live next month, a move that has left many people outraged. Comedian Margaret Cho joined the foray, slamming producers for inviting a “known racist” to participate while failing for decades to promote true racial equality.

Taking aim, Cho said:

Why has there never been an Asian-American host, cast member or musical guest on ‘SNL’ in 41 years? Forty-one years. Yet they want Donald Trump, a known racist, a known sexist, who disgustingly wants to have sex with his daughter. Who does he think he is, Woody Allen?”

“People come at me and say, ‘Oh, Fred Armisen is a quarter Japanese, Rob Schneider is half Filipino.’ Yeah, that makes three-quarters of an Asian-American, not even in one person, in 41 years.

Cho went on to suggest herself as a musical guest and Ken Jeong and George Takei as potential hosts.