Olivia Munn as Psylocke in the upcoming “X-Men: Apocalypse”

 

Get ready for the first appearance of the Olivia Munn Psylocke.

Check out a new image of the Olivia Munn Psylocke and read on for the actress’ thoughts on getting the character right

ComingSoon.net (by Silas Lesnick):

This summer’s X-Men: Apocalypse is set to mark the first major appearance of the mutant known as Psylocke on the big screen. As you can see from a newly-released image, 20th Century Fox is committed to making the Olivia Munn Psylocke true to the character in the comic book and, in a new interview with CNET, the actress explains why she’s proud of her take on the psionic mutant.

“I’ve loved Psylocke for so long,” Munn tells the outlet. “She’s a really, really strong badass female character in this comic book world where a lot of times the women don’t get to be strong and badass. You see a lot of superheroes [who] don’t always want to kill, and they’ll avoid it if they can. She’s never had a problem killing, and I like that she was the bad guy that had no problem being the bad guy. She’s telekinetic and telepathic so she can read your mind. She can create anything with her mind. To win any, she can just create a mountain and have it fall down on you, but she chooses to create a sword so she can kill up close and personal. I always thought that was really cool and badass.”

Like quite a few Marvel mutants, Psylocke’s comic book history is a bit strange. Elizabeth Braddock first appeared in 1976’s “Captain Britain” #8 as the twin sister of the UK book’s title hero. It wasn’t until a decade later in the pages of “New Mutants Annual” #2 that Braddock, a telepath, took over the body and abilities of a Japanese ninja, Kwannon, becoming the X-Men member known as Psylocke.

Whether Olivia Munn’s Pyslocke will have such a convoluted origin story remains to be seen.

Said to be the conclusion of a trilogy started with X-Men: First Class and continued with X-Men: Days of Future Past, the Bryan Singer-directed X-Men: Apocalypse is set for release on May 27, 2016.

Library of Congress names graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang (“Boxers and Saints”) as Ambassador for Young People’s Literature

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New York Times (by George Gene Gustines):

Gene Luen Yang often mines his life for his graphic novels. He has explored being a first-generation American, and harnessed his love of computer programming. Starting this week, he will have a whole new experience to draw on.

On Monday, the Library of Congress is to name Mr. Yang the national ambassador for young people’s literature, the first graphic novelist to be so honored since the post was created in 2008.

When I was coming up in the ’90s, the comic book industry and the book industry were largely separate — they had their own awards, distribution systems and stores,” Mr. Yang said in a telephone interview from his home in San Jose, Calif. But now, “these worlds are really converging in interesting ways.”

Mr. Yang’s stories leapfrog genres and often pose questions about acceptance, identity and culture. Perhaps his best-known graphic novel is “American Born Chinese,” about Jin Wang, a boy who has trouble fitting in when he moves to a new school in the suburbs. The New York Times greeted the book as “a dark exploration of Asian-American adolescence” that blends two cultures “in inventive, unexpected ways.”

An excerpt from Gene Luen Yang’s graphic novel “American Born Chinese” (2006). CreditGene Luen Yang

American Born Chinese,” published by First Second in 2006, achieved a couple of firsts for a graphic novel: It was a finalist for a National Book Award and it won the Michael L. Printz Award. It also received an Eisner Award, one of the most prestigious honors in the comic book world, for best graphic album.

His other books include “Boxers and Saints” (2013), a work of historical fiction with dollops of mysticism set during the Boxer Rebellion in China; and “Secret Coders” (2015), illustrated by Mike Holmes, about students solving mysteries at an unsettling school. (The text slyly teaches readers basic computer coding.) In June Mr. Yang joined the group of writers working on Superman for DC Comics.

Mr. Yang, 42, the son of Chinese immigrants, grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. He began drawing at 2, he said, and “I basically never stopped.” His gateway for comic books was Superman, which he began reading in fifth grade. Marvel’s Fantastic Four and Spider-Man soon followed. He started creating his own comics. “I was always interested in telling stories through drawings,” he recalled.

At the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Yang majored in computer science partly to please his father, who wanted him to pursue something practical, and minored in creative writing. He worked as a computer engineer for two years after graduating and then began teaching computer science at a high school, a job that lasted 17 years. He gave it up only when his travels in support of his books began to involve too much time away.

Secret Coders,” released in September, was inspired partly by his teaching experience. “What I wanted to do was combine a narrative with lessons,” he said. “You ought to be able to do basic programming from reading the first volume.” Mr. Yang is also running an art contest related to the book to encourage readers to try some basic programming.

Mr. Yang also taps his background for his work with DC Comics. “When DC approached me, ‘Superman as the prototypical immigrant’ was one of my first thoughts,” he wrote in an email. He noted that dual identities are a daily reality for the children of immigrants. “Many of us use one name at home, another at school,” he said. “We move between two different sets of expectations the way many superheroes do.” When he recounted Superman’s origin story in an issue published in November as part of an adventure set in Oakland, Calif., he gave the superhero some immigrant anxieties about belonging.

In reflecting on his new role as ambassador, Mr. Yang said he found his wife, Theresa, a development director for an elementary school, a tremendous resource. He said that he was inspired by her program for encouraging students to read and write in different genres and that she was enthusiastic about the ambassadorship. His children — a son and three daughters — are a little harder to satisfy.

It is difficult to impress any kid that you see on a daily basis,” Mr. Yang said. The same is true of his children’s reactions to his books, though all of them are avid readers. “They tell me they like them, but they like other people’s books better than mine.

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French-Cambodian actress Élodie Yung as Elektra, revealed in the new ‘Daredevil’ Season 2 trailer

Elektra Revealed in ‘Daredevil’ Season 2

Entertainment Weekly/MovieWeb:

Marvel’s Daredevil is set to introduce the violent sexy mercenary (The Girl with the Dragon tattoo actress Élodie Yung) in season 2. She’ll complicate Matt Murdoch’s life while he struggles to handle new threats in Hell’s Kitchen, including Frank Castle a.k.a. The Punisher (Jon Bernthal).

Above is a first photo of the actress in the show — albeit without her double-sai-dagger-wielding costume on.

Elektra and Punisher will be joined in Daredevil Season 2 by returning stars Rosario Dawson as Claire Temple, a.k.a. Night Nurse, and Scott Glenn as Stick. We also reported in November that Sonia Braga has signed on to star in Marvel’s Luke Cage as Claire Temple’s mother, but it isn’t known if this character will also surface in Season 2 of Marvel’s Daredevil.

Netflix hasn’t announced when the new season will debut quite yet, but hopefully we’ll find out more soon.

Entertainment Weekly also spoke to Daredevil showrunner Douglas Petrie, who reveals that Elektra will become Matt Murdock’s girlfriend. “Matt’s a deeply moral complicated guy and she’s just the best bad girlfriend you can possibly have. She does everything wrong and attractive, she’s his id, the wild side. Matt is always taming his wild side. Elektra just lets it out. He’s both repulsed and deeply drawn to that.

Brendan Tang’s “mechanized vases” morph Ming-style ceramics with the biomorphic mechas of comics, manga, anime and sci-fi

Brendan Tang - Ceramics

Beautiful Decay (by Hayley Evans):

Brendan Tang is a ceramic artist who sculpts elaborate pieces that fuse together various cultural imageries and traditions. The series of work featured here, titled Manga Ormolu, can best be described as “mechanized vases”—vases that combine Ming-style ceramics with the biomorphic mechas of comic books and science fiction.

The forms are abstract and futuristic-looking; there are pots and plates with rocket engines, valves, wires, tubes, and more. Some of the creations seem to be caught in the moment of “turning,” creasing ceramic skin to expose the robotic structures beneath. As objects of curiosity and ambiguity, Tang’s works look as unpredictable and otherworldly as they do beautiful and decorative.

The seamless hybridity of Tang’s Manga Ormolu explore contemporary discourses on technology and globalization. Born in Ireland to Trinidadian parents and currently residing in Canada, Tang brings his own diverse background and experience into his work. As his sculptures evolve into unique cultural-technological beings, they comment on how disparate cultural histories are encountering each other in the present-day world—and the speed at which they are doing so. The harmony embodied by each vase-hybrid, however, also seems to signify a unique form of transnational identity: one that overcomes the limitations and demarcations of national borders without losing its sense of culture and history.

Visit Tang’s website and Instagram to view more of his works.

Brendan Tang - Ceramics

Brendan Tang - Ceramics

Brendan Tang - Ceramics

Brendan Tang - CeramicsBrendan Tang - CeramicsBrendan Tang - CeramicsBrendan Tang - Ceramics

Dragon Con brings cosplayers, anime characters to Atlanta

Associated Press: 

Atlanta‘s annual Dragon Con science fiction and fantasy convention filled the city’s downtown streets with people dressed as zombies, steampunk time travelers, purple-haired anime heroes and aliens by the dozens.

The convention draws fans from around the country to take part in sci-fi and fantasy costume contests, a massive parade through downtown Atlanta and educational seminars about science and costumes making.

One of the more popular events at the convention this year was a private party held at the Georgia Aquarium, home to the largest aquarium in the Western Hemisphere. Costumed revelers danced and drank under the glow of passing Beluga whales and sharks on display, and dance-heavy music thumped in the background.

Tens of thousands attend the annual event, which began Thursday and continued through the weekend.

Kazuki Takamatsu’s seductive manga-inspired lolita paintings

kazuki-takamatsu painting

Beautiful Decay (by Stephanie Young):

Like a seductive cloud of silky smoke, Kazuki Takamatsu’s lolitas dance on the brink of adolescence and adulthood. Using a technique called depth mapping which is similar to the 3D effect seen in video games such as Zelda, Takamatsu hand paints pixels in a monotone palette of black and white. The effect plays tricks on the eye allowing it to see multiple shadows, similar to holograms in the figures of dainty nubiles. His vision transforms them into living spirits.

Takamatsu says his Lolita subjects are all based on the average Japanese girl. In their likeness, he comments on good and evil, society and history. In barely there clothing, these pretty young things clutch guns, cities and swords. It’s a strange dynamic to use such a beautiful aesthetic to comment on war and violence. In places, it comes off a bit disturbing because it tends to take on a very objectified view of young women. But this is the tradition of manga, considered a high art form in Japan.

Manga is a series of comic books originating in Japan. They are read by all ages but seem to be especially popular  among teenage boys and girls. The stories deal with typical subject matter; romance, action, adventure, horror, sports etc. There are however, more underground forms of manga where homosexuality, incest, transgender and pedophilia are discussed freely. Besides Japan, Europe is the second largest consumer of manga and the U.S. is a close third.

kazuki takamatsu painting

kazuki takamatsu painting

kazuki takamatsu painting

kazuki takamatsu paintingkazuki takamatsu paintingkazuki_takamatsu_ painting

Custom leather armors inspired by iconic characters make for some unique cosplay

prince armor 3

RocketNews 24:

Cosplay that looks exactly like the source material is so yesterday’s news. Nowadays plenty of people take a character and use their basic look and color scheme to design a whole new costume never seen before.

People who are looking to go a little medieval with their costumes and aren’t leatherworking experts should probably look to Prince Armory, who design and create uniquely amazing sets of leather armor. Their finished pieces look so gorgeous you’ll probably want to refer to them as art. Art that could probably stop a knife, that is.

Prince Armory has been creating custom hand crafted armor, costumes and leather products since 2007. What began as a business that was almost exclusively custom one-off items has blossomed into full sets of leather armor commissioned by their patrons.

While much of their work is inspired by fantasy and medieval settings, a few of their pieces have dipped into modern-day geekery.

Asgardian Iron Man Completed Full Armor
Custom Leather Armor by Prince Armory

Asgardian Iron Man Cuirass
Custom Leather Armor by Prince Armory

Asgardian Iron Man Helmet

Custom Leather by Prince Armory www.PrinceArmory.com

Besides Iron Man, their customers have commissioned medieval inspired costumes based on characters such as Darth Vader, Marvel’s Loki, DC’s Batman and the Joker and even the Warrior of Light from Final Fantasy.

Medieval Lord Vader
Custom Leather Armor

Medieval Joker Leather Armor by Prince Armory

Functional hardened leather full body armor including:

Jester’s Helmet with Joker Mask, Breastplate, Drama Face Pauldrons, Breastplate, Jester’s War Skirt, Cuisses/Knees/Greaves, Articulated Jester Shoe Sabatons

Updated Medieval Loki Helmet (horns carved and painted gold)

Leather Helmet with water buffalo horns

Warrior of Light Helmet

Part of a custom armor order based off a final fantasy character. Made from leather, horse hair and horn

Warrior of Light (from Final Fantasy)

Prince Armory’s impressive work has also been used in a Samsung TV commercial. Take a close look at the rider at the beginning on the white horse.

To see more of their outstanding work, be sure to take a look at their websiteFacebook or DeviantArt page to see all the amazing pieces they’ve crafted. What’s great about their work is that every commission is an original, and they will never do the same exact set twice.

Prince Armory’s impressive work has also been used in a Samsung TV commercial. Take a close look at the rider at the beginning on the white horse.

To see more of their outstanding work, be sure to take a look at their website,Facebook or DeviantArt page to see all the amazing pieces they’ve crafted. What’s great about their work is that every commission is an original, and they will never do the same exact set twice. If you want a suit of armor made by them, you can be assured that no one else will be riding into battle with the same fearsome leather as you will!