Technology meets romance: Zhang Ziyi’s boyfriend proposes with ring-bearing drone

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Audrey Magazine:

A drone is an aerial vehicle which can fly around without a human pilot aboard. Instead, this aircraft is guided remotely. Now I don’t know about you, but nothing about remote airplanes scream “romantic” to me. Well, it seems Zhang Ziyi’s boyfriend Wang Feng intends to change that.

Zhang Ziyi, the Chinese actress most known for her roles in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), House of Flying Daggers (2004) and Memoirs of a Geisha (2005), just celebrated her 36th birthday. Her boyfriend Wang Feng, a Chinese rock musician, decided that she needed much more than a rainbow cake to celebrate her birthday.

Pictures have made it onto the internet showing a small, white drone flying towards the couple. Wang Feng apparently reached into the basket hanging from the drone and pulled out a diamond ring before getting down on one knee and asking for Zhang Ziyi’s hand in marriage.

View image on Twitter
According to Chinese media, Wang made a promise to take care of Zhang even in old age. The two then embraced and kissed as fireworks lit the sky.

On Sunday, Zhang shared a picture of heart-shaped fireworks on her Sina Weibo microblog account along with the caption, “I do!”

Wang followed this up by posting a few words on his own microblog. “Thanks for giving me a perfect life — all hardships are already in the past,” he posted on Sunday. “From here on out, we’ll grow old hand-in-hand.”

Needless to say, fans are delighted with the extravagant proposal. Even after seeing our fair share of unique marriage proposals, a drone proposal is still a rare sight. So tell us. Is a ring-bearing drone cute or way too over the top?

 

Dalian Wanda sneaks peek at theme park in Wuhan

Dailan Wanda sneeks peek at new

Variety:

China’s giant property and entertainment conglomerate Dalian Wanda Group has raised the curtain – a little bit – on its new multi-billion dollar theme park and theater developments in Wuhan Nov. 7 as it expands its presence across the country while continuing to stretch its reach around the globe.

Steered by China’s second-richest man Wang Jianlin, the company in 2012 purchased AMC Entertainment, thereby staking its claim to be the world’s largest cinema operator, while it has recently announced billion-dollar plans to establish facilities in Hollywood and Australia.

But the developments in Wuhan — which will be officially opened Dec. 20 — reflect the current shift in China towards “internal consumption,”according to Tang Jun, vice president of the Beijing Wanda Cultural Industry Group.

Tang said it was thought that “entertainment and leisure could be one of the major drivers” of this economic trend in China, which has been a mantra pushed by China President Xi Jinping

This development is unprecedented in China,” claimed Tang. “It’s a combination of culture with high technology. That’s the charter.”

A small group of select guests were treated Nov. 7 to a sneak preview of the attractions being fine-tuned in Wuhan, while also taking in behind-the-scenes tours of the sprawling buildings that will house them.

Mark Fisher — the British artistic director of the Beijing and London Olympics who passed away in June — designed the Han Show Theatre based on a traditional glowing Chinese red lantern, and the Wanda Movie Park, which covers an areas of 100,000 square meters, from the shape of China’s Chu-Han culture’s ancient bells.

Opening next month, the “The Han Show,” created by theatrical director Franco Dragone, will be staged in the custom-build theater that carries its name while the Wanda Movie Park — Wanda is claiming it’s the world’s first indoor movie theme park — will boast six major attractions developed with the likes of Industrial Light & Magic, as well as retail and dining outlets.

Tang said Wuhan, one of China’s “second-tier” cities with a population of around 10.2 million, capital of the Hubei province and situated in the center of the country, had been earmarked for cultural development due to its rich heritage, which dates back to 1500 BC. Its East Lake was a favored holiday destination for China’s former leader Mao Tse-tung.

But Tang said the plan was to also establish a “new image” for Wuhan.

To that end, the two theater and theme park facilities are supplemented by Han Street: a retail, dining and entertainment district that Wanda says has attracted an average of more than 300,000 visitors per day since opening in September 2011. Han Street now comes surrounded by a growing number of commercial buildings and towering condominiums, with the hope that sales of flats within them will offset some of the overall cost of the project. There are also hotels around the developments, including the five-star Wanda Reign, which sits next to the Han Show Theatre.

Wanda is also hoping crowds will flock to the site to take in attractions at the Wanda Movie Park, and guests Nov. 7 tested out the Hubei in the Air flight simulation ride that flies guests through the province’s spectacular sites. Other attractions set to open next month include a 3D Journey to the West interactive ride/game.

We think (capacity) will be about 8,000 people at one time. During the first year we are projecting three million visitors and for revenue RMB800 million ($130.6 million),” said Aaron Soo, Wanda Movie Park’s general manager, who estimated the movie park alone would cost his company around RMB4.2 billion ($685 million) when completed. No official estimate of the amount Dalian Wanda Group has spent was offered.

Dragone is also fine-tuning “The Han Show” with the help of costume designer Tim Yip (“Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) and Nov. 7 presented a series of small live excepts from the show to guests. “The Han Show” is looking to build on the success Dragone and his team have had in the southern Chinese gambling hub of Macau with “The House of Dancing Water,” which has met with great success since opening at the City of Dreams casino resort in 2010.

Although not giving too much away, Dragone explained his production would reflect how young Chinese people today are facing up to their future, told through the story of a teenage couple.

I will never have enough in seven lives to learn about the grandeur of this country,” said Dragone, the former Cirque du Soleil creative director who branched out on his own in 2000. “But I have always tried to find a language that can talk to everybody.

The Dalian Wanda Group has plans for 13 major theme parks over the next three years including a film studio and theme park complex in Qingdao, which will host a film festival starting in 2017.

It also has plans to establish a further 200 smaller “Baby King” theme parks specifically for younger children across China over the next few years.

As well as the acquisition of AMC Entertainment —which pushed its reach to more than 6,000 screens globally — the company has thrown its financial weight behind a series of major productions in recent years, among them Jackie Chan’s “Police Story 2013” and the 3D martial arts fantasy hit “The Monkey King: Uproar in Heaven,” starring Chow Yun-fat and Donnie Yen.

“Crouching Tiger” sequel to premiere exclusively on Netflix

Angry Asian Man: 

Between original content like House of Cards and Orange is the New Black, Netflix has been making some big moves, and its latest distribution deal could be a gamechanger. The pay service has struck a deal with The Weinstein Company to release its first major feature film: the sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

According to Deadline, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Destiny, described as “sort of a sequel” to Ang Lee‘s critically-acclaimed 2000 martial arts epic, will premiere exclusively on Netflix’s subscriber-based video streaming service. The film will also simultaneously open IMAX theaters on August 28, 2015.

The Green Destiny, directed by Yuen Wo-Ping, stars Michelle Yeoh and Donnie Yen, is based on the fifth book in the Crane-Iron Petalogy by Wang Du Lu. (Crouching Tiger was based on the fourth book in the series.)

Yeoh is reprising her role as Yu Shu-Lien. Ang Lee has no involvement in the project.

Yuen Wo-Ping is directing a script by John Fusco, and Michelle Yeoh and Donnie Yen star. Lee is not involved in this, and the connective tissue is the source material based on the Crane-Iron Pentalogy by Wang Du Lu. Crouching Tiger was the fourth book in the series, and this film is based on the fifth installment, Silver Vase, Iron Knight. Both are from Wu Sia, the centuries-old genre of Chinese fiction that this series is part of. There is plenty of high-wire sword fighting along with the themes of lost love, young love and redemption. Yeoh reprises her role as Yu Shu-Lien, and Donnie Yen plays Silent Wolf. The film is shooting in New Zealand. Yuen is a legendary filmmaker and fight choreographer, and the production team is composed of all seasoned feature players. Peter Berg and Sarah Aubrey are producing with Weinstein and The Imitation Game helmer Morten Tyldum is exec producing with Ralph Winter, Anthony Wong and Bey Logan.

Harry Shum Jr. join “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” sequel

Angry Asian Man: 
Harry Shum Jr., whose moves (and abs) you know and love from Glee, has been cast as one of the leads in the sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon which started production this week.Yes, there is Crouching Tiger sequel in the works. Directed by master action choreographer Yuen Wo-Ping, the movie is set twenty years after the events of Ang Lee‘s award-winning martial arts drama. The sequel’s cast includes Donnie Yen and Michelle Yeoh, reprising her role Yu Shu-lien.

 

 

Harry will play Tie-Fang, a kung fu hero who must fight to keep a legendary sword out of the wrong hands:

Written by John Fusco (The Forbidden Kingdom), the movie is set 20 years after the events of Crouching Tiger and revolves around four heroes of the martial arts world — Silent Wolf, Yu Shu-lien, Tie-Fang and Snow Vase — who must use their courage and skills to keep the legendary sword Green Destiny from the hands of the villainous Hades Dai.

Donnie Yen already is cast as Silent Wolf, and Michelle Yeoh is on board as Yu Shu-lien.

Shum will play Tie-Fang.

The sequel, reportedly titled Crouching Tiger 2: The Green Destiny, is being produced by The Weinstein Company and will shoot in New Zealand and China. Am I the only one who is concerned that script is written by the guy whose credits include that craptastic Jet Li/Jackie Chan movie The Forbidden Kingdom?

Link

Why Young Asian-Americans Are Fleeing Hollywood

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We were speaking in English and picking strawberries at a night market in Taipei last winter when the storekeeper curiously asked my friend where I was from (even though I had lived there for seven years). “She’s visiting from New York,” my friend informed him. After buying the strawberries, she said, “it’s funny how he just assumed I was Taiwanese. It must be because of my skirt.”

My friend had undergone a complete image overhaul after moving from Minnesota back to Taiwan to launch her singing career. While her story may seem bizarre, there are many stories like hers. Originally from California, Tiffany from the K-pop group Girls Generation mentioned in an interview that while she once craved pizza, she now eats dwenjang jigae (tofu stew) and has become “full Korean.

http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/girls-generation-tiffany-and-jessica/images/28396256/title/jeti-photo

Asian-Americans have been moving to Asia to break into the entertainment industry for a while now despite initially having a limited grasp of Mandarin, Cantonese or Korean. It’s been difficult for Asian-Americans to make it in Hollywood, since they are often type-casted into certain roles such as socially awkward geeks or kungfu masters. Mike Hale from the New York Times described how even famous actresses like Maggie Q and Lucy Liu are not entirely able to escape the mold of the “sexy nerd” or the “dragon lady.”

In the past, Asian-American actors and actresses like Russell Wong and Maggie Q (both of whom are mixed race) have used Asia as a launching pad to break into the industry and subsequently move back to the U.S. These days however, an increasing number are deciding to remain in Asia. The expanding entertainment industry there simply promises more opportunities for them. Asian-American actors and singers are finally getting a chance to pursue their American dreams, but ironically, it’s Asia that’s making it possible.

Maggie Q told Time Out magazine that she owes her success to Hong Kong. Originally from Hawaii, she moved there in 1997 with $20 in her pocket in a last-ditch effort after failed modeling stints in Japan and Taiwan. Whereas Taiwanese markets at the time were looking for either “tall blonds” or “100% Chinese girls,” Hong Kong consumers were craving something fresh. Maggie Q fit the bill. She was introduced to acting by Jackie Chan and learned martial arts (and Cantonese) from scratch. She starred in both English and Cantonese-speaking movies in Hong Kong, and was propelled to fame in 2002 acting alongside fellow Asian-American actor Daniel Wu in Naked Weapon.

Unlike Maggie Q , the Californian born-and-raised Daniel Wu decided to remain in Hong Kong. An established movie star now, Wu could barely speak Cantonese when he first arrived there in 1997. Both Maggie Q and Daniel Wu, being unable to read characters, wrote out their lines phonetically. Wu’s decision to remain in Hong Kong had much to do with representations of Asians in Hollywood. Whenever a Chinese film is screened in the U.S. it is repackaged such that American audiences can comprehend it, Wu told the University of Oregon’s Daily Emerald newspaper. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, he argued, was a blockbuster hit because it was a simple love story within an action movie.

Daniel Henney chose to make Korea his home for similar reasons. The Michigan-bred, half-Caucasian, half-Korean actor told CNN that he considers himself a “Korean actor until the day I die” because “Korea gave me my career.”

After working in Hong Kong and Taiwan for a few years, Henney decided to move to Seoul. He has created a niche for himself playing English-speaking roles in movies filmed in Korea and China. In Shanghai Calling for instance, he plays a Chinese American lawyer who relocates to Shanghai.

It’s not just Asian-American actors, but also singers who are making waves in Asia. Taiwanese American pop-stars Lee Hom Wang and Wilber Pan have redefined Mandopop (the Chinese/Taiwanese counterpart to K-pop). Growing up in Rochester, NY, Wang spoke mostly English at home. He was introduced to the Taiwanese music scene during his summer trips throughout high school and college. Pan on the other hand attended Taipei American School but is glad to have been “exposed to both kinds of cultures.” Both artists mix hip-hop and R&B with ballads and traditional Chinese instrumental sounds. Wang’s Shangri-la is an example of this.

Similarly, the Korean entertainment industry has helped Korean American singers Jessica and Tiffany from Girls Generation to launch their careers. In an interview with Soompi, the girls discussed adjusting to life in Korea, including having to tone down their “wild” behavior and acting more “ladylike.” Apparently, K-pop has given these girls the break that they needed, since Girls Generation is doing extremely well.

Despite the linguistic and cultural barriers that accompany moving to a new country, Asian-American actors and singers are choosing to remain in Asia. Furthermore, crossing over to Hollywood isn’t exactly a rite of passage for them anymore since many have found stardom in Asia. As Maggie Q stated, casting agencies are increasingly looking for “mixed girls.”

And as Jessica from Girls Generation explained, being fluent in English has been a plus. Whereas Asian-Americans are often times consigned to stereotypical roles in Hollywood, their biculturalism is an asset in Asia. As such, Asia has become the new Land of Opportunity for Asian-Americans trying to make it in the entertainment industry.

Check out this link:

Why Young Asian-Americans Are Fleeing Hollywood

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Zhang Ziyi in talks to join the cast of Crouching Tiger sequel

Zhang Ziyi in talks to join the cast of Crouching Tiger sequel

Diretor Ang Lee’s multi-Oscar-winning martial arts drama Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is based on the fourth of five installments in the “Crane Iron Pentalogy” written by Chinese author Wang Dulu. The finale novel in Dulu’s saga, titled “Iron Knight, Silver Vase,” will partly serve as the basis for the upcoming movie sequel, which has been titled– Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon – The Green Destiny.

Entertainment Weekly is reporting that Zhang Ziyi may appear in the Crouching Tiger sequel through flashback scenes. The sequel’s cast will include Michelle Yeoh, who is reprising her role as the hardened and quietly-suffering warrior Yu Shu Lien.

Check out this link:

Zhang Ziyi in talks to join the cast of Crouching Tiger sequel

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