Official San Diego Comic-Con ‘Into the Badlands’ Trailer (featuring Daniel Wu)

Television company AMC, which brought stellar dramas such as Breaking Bad, Mad Men, andThe Walking Dead, are back at it again with a new original drama titled Into the Badlands. First premiering during San Diego Comic-Con last Saturday, the trailer stars Daniel Wu as Sunny, a ruthless warrior outside of an America run by seven leaders and their respective personal armies. Sunny is accompanied by a young boy named M.K., played by Aramis Knight, and encounters action-packed adventures and conflict in this near-future adaptation of the classic fable “Journey to the West.”

The drama will consist of six one-hour episodes and will debut in November on AMC.

You will see more Asian guys on TV soon!

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Audrey Magazine:

Right now in Hollywood, it’s pilot casting season and (much to our delight) a lot of Asian American male actors are making headlines. Could this be the turn of the tide? Can we finally turn on the TV and regularly see Asian characters? We’ll have to wait and see. Although a number of shows have released information about their pilot, we will all have to wait until May for broadcast network channels to decide which shows to pick up and put on television. Needless to say, we have our fingers crossed for the shows which can bring forward Asian faces.

Apart from Daniel Wu’s Badlands, which has already been ordered directly to series by AMC, it is possible that none of the other pilots mentioned below will be picked up, but the rise in Asian American male actors being casted definitely gives us hope. Furthermore, they are being cast in roles that are substantial supporting roles or even leads. After all, it’s not just visibility that matters, but also the quality of representation.

Hopefully, we will hear about more pilot castings for talented Asian American actors in the upcoming months. For now, it’s heartening to see strides being made.

1. Daniel Wu

Image courtesy of LA TF

First up, there’s Hong Kong star Daniel Wu with his martial arts show Badlands, which cable network AMC has already ordered direct to series. Based very loosely on the Chinese tale Journey to the West, Wu stars as a “ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny” who goes on a journey with a young boy to find enlightenment. Wu will also serve as executive producer on Badlands. Only limited information about the series has been released, but we are definitely going to check it out once it airs on AMC.

 

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You Will See More Asian Guys on TV Soon

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 4.23.25 PM

Right now in Hollywood, it’s pilot casting season and (much to our delight) a lot of Asian American male actors are making headlines. Could this be the turn of the tide? Can we finally turn on the TV and regularly see Asian characters? We’ll have to wait and see. Although a number of shows have released information about their pilot, we will all have to wait until May for broadcast network channels to decide which shows to pick up and put on television. Needless to say, we have our fingers crossed for the shows which can bring forward Asian faces.

Apart from Daniel Wu’s Badlands, which has already been ordered directly to series by AMC, it is possible that none of the other pilots mentioned below will be picked up, but the rise in Asian American male actors being casted definitely gives us hope. Furthermore, they are being cast in roles that are substantial supporting roles or even leads. After all, it’s not just visibility that matters, but also the quality of representation.

Hopefully, we will hear about more pilot castings for talented Asian American actors in the upcoming months. For now, it’s heartening to see strides being made.

 


 

1. Daniel Wu

Image courtesy of LA TF

First up, there’s Hong Kong star Daniel Wu with his martial arts show Badlands, which cable network AMC has already ordered direct to series. Based very loosely on the Chinese tale Journey to the West, Wu stars as a “ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny” who goes on a journey with a young boy to find enlightenment. Wu will also serve as executive producer on Badlands. Only limited information about the series has been released, but we are definitely going to check it out once it airs on AMC.

 

2. Ken Jeong

Image courtesy of Korea Times

Before Ken Jeong popped out of a trunk in The Hangover series, he was a practicing doctor by day at Kaiser Permanente and an aspiring comedian at night. Now ABC has greenlit his comedy pilot Dr. Ken, which Jeong is set to star, write and executive produce. According to Variety, Jeong will “play a frustrated HMO doctor juggling his career, marriage and parenting, but succeeding at none of them.” If this gets picked up, perhaps ABC could form a one hour Asian American comedy block with Dr. Ken and Fresh off the Boat?

 

3. Brian Tee

Image courtesy of Zimbio

Brian Tee has been in a lot of movies and TV shows such as The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, The Wolverine and the upcoming  Jurrasic World movie. Now, he has been cast for the NBC pilot Love is the Four Letter Word, created by a fellow Asian American writer Diana Son. According to Deadline, Love is the Four Letter Wordchronicles the collision of race, sexuality and gender roles when three diverse couples put modern marriage to the test. Tee plays Adam, half of one of the three couples, a big, handsome man who is currently dating Sarah, a fellow attorney who shares his taste for sexual adventure, including three-ways with beautiful women.”

Asian Americans in lead roles in front of and behind the camera? Plus an Asian American male character who shatters the emasculated, subservient Asian male stereotype? We are swooning already.

 

4. Daniel Henney

DanielHenney-1

Daniel Henney has been cast in a Criminal Minds spinoff. According to Deadline,the proposed spinoff follows FBI agents helping American citizens who find themselves in trouble abroad, with Gary Sinise playing their boss, Jack Garrett. Henney will play charming family man Matt Simmons, an army brat who grew up abroad and really embraces the opportunity to explore different cultures. But first and foremost, he is the kind of guy you would follow into battle, and his split second profiling skills honed on the battlefield make him a crucial part of the team.”

Henney joins an illustrious cast that includes Tyler James Williams and Emmy-award winner Anna Gunn.

 

5. Albert Tsai

Image courtesy of Albert Tsai's Official Twitter Account

For those of you who didn’t see ABC’s shortlived critical darling Trophy Wife, Albert Tsai played the breakout character Bert, who was considered by many to be the best part of a very good show. Although the show was cancelled after one season, Albert Tsai is moving on and has been cast as Ken Jeong’s son in the Dr. Ken pilot. Another Asian American family on an ABC sitcom? Just maybe. Is it too early to start the petition for the Fresh off the Boat/Dr. Ken crossover? Probably not.

 

HYPEBEAST Essentials: Daniel Wu

Image of Essentials: Daniel Wu

Presenting the Essentials to one of Cantonese film industry’s most illustrious, our latest installment peeps into the travel must-haves of Daniel Wu, a Hong-Kong American actor, director, producer, and model. Trained in the martial art of wushu and a self-professed Jackie Chan fan, Wu has been featured in over 60 films since his debut in 1998, winning a slew of awards in that timespan.

Continuously traveling to and from movie production sites, award ceremonies — such as the 26th Hong Kong Film Awards in which Wu took home honors for Best New Director — or simply traveling to his other residencies in Shanghai and Beijing, Daniel Wu here highlights an assortment of accessories which captures the essential needs for on-the-go traveling.

A standard Macbook Pro, Portenzo covered iPad Mini, and Apple iPhone serve as the necessary traveling Apple trifecta, while a copy of Octane magazine helps to ease the turnover of long, dreary flights. Rounding out Wu’s bag of accessories is a Montblanc pen for quick note-taking, Nike Fuelband, and Lucas Paw Paw Ointment all fitting nicely in a Hex Sonic backpack. Stay updated with Wu via his Twitter and stay tuned for the next installment of HYPEBEAST Essentials soon.

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OTHERS by HYPEBEAST: Interview with actor Daniel Wu

OTHERS by HYPEBEAST takes us to the world of film with Berkeley-born actor Daniel Wu. In the video, Wu shares with us how 16 years ago, while on his way to becoming a full-time architect, a soul-searching trip to Hong Kong lead him on his path of acting — and eventually on to producing, directing and talent management.

Despite having deviated from his intended path, Wu was able to find another calling to apply his stringent work ethic and passion towards, and has since stared in over 60 Hong Kong films. Watch the video above to learn more on Daniel Wu’s ideal of OTHER and the similarities between architecture and filmmaking.

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Cinema Spotlight: “That Demon Within” (full international trailer)

Hong Kong action auteur Dante Lam (THE VIRAL FACTOR (2012), UNBEATABLE (2013)) returns to U.S. screens with THAT DEMON WITHIN a taut psychological action-thriller revolving around a dutiful cop (played by the Hong Kong heartthrob Daniel Wu) guilt-ridden over saving the life of a crime boss (Winner of the Best Actor Award at 33rd Hong Kong Film Awards, Nick Cheung).

When the crime head continues his violent and extreme ways, Wu’s obsession gets the better of him as he devises an outlandish plot to cause the syndicate to implode. World Premiering as a featured selection of the 64th Berlinale Panorama Showcase, which traditionally features films with an individual signature style, THAT DEMON WITHIN showcases director Lam’s provocative and insightful grace in what Screen Daily declares is a “twisted trip through one Hong Kong cop’s explosive meltdown” saying “Lam never lets up.”

On April 18th, 2014 THAT DEMON WITHIN is being released by China Lion Distribution at the same time as its Hong Kong release.

Link

Why Young Asian-Americans Are Fleeing Hollywood

MzE1NjUxYWIwYyMvS0ZJV0dEWXVFZ1BVbndFREtnX0VySkNjRDhvPS8xMjgweDYyMC9zbWFydC9maWx0ZXJzOnF1YWxpdHkoNzUpOnN0cmlwX2ljYygxKS9zMy5hbWF6b25hd3MuY29tJTJGcG9saWN5bWljLWltYWdlcyUyRjhmMGUwOWIzMzU2OTJkNGMwYWVhMzc1NTY5ODFiZDIxZDVhNGVjYjk3MjkzNTk5ZGYzM2RjZWZiOTU2NmPolicyMic.com (article by Dana Ter):

We were speaking in English and picking strawberries at a night market in Taipei last winter when the storekeeper curiously asked my friend where I was from (even though I had lived there for seven years). “She’s visiting from New York,” my friend informed him. After buying the strawberries, she said, “it’s funny how he just assumed I was Taiwanese. It must be because of my skirt.”

My friend had undergone a complete image overhaul after moving from Minnesota back to Taiwan to launch her singing career. While her story may seem bizarre, there are many stories like hers. Originally from California, Tiffany from the K-pop group Girls Generation mentioned in an interview that while she once craved pizza, she now eats dwenjang jigae (tofu stew) and has become “full Korean.

http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/girls-generation-tiffany-and-jessica/images/28396256/title/jeti-photo

Asian-Americans have been moving to Asia to break into the entertainment industry for a while now despite initially having a limited grasp of Mandarin, Cantonese or Korean. It’s been difficult for Asian-Americans to make it in Hollywood, since they are often type-casted into certain roles such as socially awkward geeks or kungfu masters. Mike Hale from the New York Times described how even famous actresses like Maggie Q and Lucy Liu are not entirely able to escape the mold of the “sexy nerd” or the “dragon lady.”

In the past, Asian-American actors and actresses like Russell Wong and Maggie Q (both of whom are mixed race) have used Asia as a launching pad to break into the industry and subsequently move back to the U.S. These days however, an increasing number are deciding to remain in Asia. The expanding entertainment industry there simply promises more opportunities for them. Asian-American actors and singers are finally getting a chance to pursue their American dreams, but ironically, it’s Asia that’s making it possible.

Maggie Q told Time Out magazine that she owes her success to Hong Kong. Originally from Hawaii, she moved there in 1997 with $20 in her pocket in a last-ditch effort after failed modeling stints in Japan and Taiwan. Whereas Taiwanese markets at the time were looking for either “tall blonds” or “100% Chinese girls,” Hong Kong consumers were craving something fresh. Maggie Q fit the bill. She was introduced to acting by Jackie Chan and learned martial arts (and Cantonese) from scratch. She starred in both English and Cantonese-speaking movies in Hong Kong, and was propelled to fame in 2002 acting alongside fellow Asian-American actor Daniel Wu in Naked Weapon.

Unlike Maggie Q , the Californian born-and-raised Daniel Wu decided to remain in Hong Kong. An established movie star now, Wu could barely speak Cantonese when he first arrived there in 1997. Both Maggie Q and Daniel Wu, being unable to read characters, wrote out their lines phonetically. Wu’s decision to remain in Hong Kong had much to do with representations of Asians in Hollywood. Whenever a Chinese film is screened in the U.S. it is repackaged such that American audiences can comprehend it, Wu told the University of Oregon’s Daily Emerald newspaper. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, he argued, was a blockbuster hit because it was a simple love story within an action movie.

Daniel Henney chose to make Korea his home for similar reasons. The Michigan-bred, half-Caucasian, half-Korean actor told CNN that he considers himself a “Korean actor until the day I die” because “Korea gave me my career.”

After working in Hong Kong and Taiwan for a few years, Henney decided to move to Seoul. He has created a niche for himself playing English-speaking roles in movies filmed in Korea and China. In Shanghai Calling for instance, he plays a Chinese American lawyer who relocates to Shanghai.

It’s not just Asian-American actors, but also singers who are making waves in Asia. Taiwanese American pop-stars Lee Hom Wang and Wilber Pan have redefined Mandopop (the Chinese/Taiwanese counterpart to K-pop). Growing up in Rochester, NY, Wang spoke mostly English at home. He was introduced to the Taiwanese music scene during his summer trips throughout high school and college. Pan on the other hand attended Taipei American School but is glad to have been “exposed to both kinds of cultures.” Both artists mix hip-hop and R&B with ballads and traditional Chinese instrumental sounds. Wang’s Shangri-la is an example of this.

Similarly, the Korean entertainment industry has helped Korean American singers Jessica and Tiffany from Girls Generation to launch their careers. In an interview with Soompi, the girls discussed adjusting to life in Korea, including having to tone down their “wild” behavior and acting more “ladylike.” Apparently, K-pop has given these girls the break that they needed, since Girls Generation is doing extremely well.

Despite the linguistic and cultural barriers that accompany moving to a new country, Asian-American actors and singers are choosing to remain in Asia. Furthermore, crossing over to Hollywood isn’t exactly a rite of passage for them anymore since many have found stardom in Asia. As Maggie Q stated, casting agencies are increasingly looking for “mixed girls.”

And as Jessica from Girls Generation explained, being fluent in English has been a plus. Whereas Asian-Americans are often times consigned to stereotypical roles in Hollywood, their biculturalism is an asset in Asia. As such, Asia has become the new Land of Opportunity for Asian-Americans trying to make it in the entertainment industry.

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Why Young Asian-Americans Are Fleeing Hollywood