Sonya Fu’s digital dreamscape paintings

Sonya Fu - PaintingBeautiful Decay (by Stephanie Chan):

Sonya Fu’s digital paintings seek to open the third eye and unlock the limbo between wakefulness and sleep. Rendered in soft vibrant colors, her characters are lit up, though from within or without we are uncertain. Shapes and bubbles of light play on their faces, like projections from an unknown dimension. Their half-closed dreaming eyes add to the eerie yet somehow peaceful quality of the paintings, as though we’re witnessing some mystical wandering of the mind.

Art is a powerful visual language and creating art is a calming and therapeutic process,” Fu says. “I would like to share with people my dreamscape, its beauty and its oddity.

It might be an eerie creature, a whimsical scenery or a disturbed beauty who speaks words of wisdom – they are all embodiments of my subconscious mind.

Sonya Fu - Painting

Sonya Fu - Painting

Sonya Fu - Painting

Sonya Fu - PaintingSonya Fu - PaintingSonya Fu - PaintingSonya Fu - PaintingSonya Fu - PaintingSonya Fu - Painting

Emojis as a new art medium

emojink (2)

RocketNews 24:

If you’re as addicted to your phone as we are, there’s a good chance you can draw 95 percent of the emoji you know with your eyes closed. Much to the chagrin of high school English teachers everywhere, it can sometimes seem that half of our communication is taken up by the colorful little faces. And it’s understandable–they can express quite a bit!

But thanks to a new site, anyone can freely combine emoji for a hundred times more expressiveness. That’s exactly what Kazuki Takakura, art director for a Tokyo theatre company, did–and the results are nothing short of spectacular! And slightly nightmarish.

▼Forget your paint palette, we have emoji!

emojink (7)

With the evocative URL emoji.ink, the website presents users with every emoji available, as you can see above. After selecting an emoji, the user is presented with a blank canvas, upon which your chosen emoji can be placed. Clicking and dragging will paste a string of the images, like a paint brush. You can quickly select other emoji by pressing any key on the keyboard or change their size. With a bit of practice, you can get something like this!

 

emojink

Or, if you happen to be a real artist, unlike us, you can create something a bit more impressive.

But as impressive as the hip-hop art above is, things can always get…weirder. Especially when Kazuki Takakura, art director for Tokyo theatre company Hanchu-yuei, decides to get involved. While we’re sure that not all theater company art directors create bizarre works of emoji art, Kazuki has certainly gone a long way towards scarring us for life with stuff like Creepy Pikachu.

▼When you turn the lights off tonight, just remember: It’s under your bed.

emojink (1)

▼The only explanation offered for this was “Robo.”

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▼Sure, this might be a rooster. Or it might be the Devourer of Souls.

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▼Are those eyes…or tentacles? Or both?!

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▼This just reminds us of the Hifana “Wamono” video.

emojink (6)

 ▼This is supposed to be Pokémon’s Venusaur (Fushigibana in Japanese).

emojink (9)

▼Annnd…this non-edible version of Baymax is actually pretty cool!

emojink (2)

 

Link

Artist Profile: Yang Yongliang’s epic digital collage “From the New World”

 

Juxtapoz:

 

Chinese artist Yang Yongliang has unveiled his largest work to date, From the New World. In this epic digital collage, Yongliang constructs a dystopian future, a crowded and creepy landscape. This piece continues the same necessary dialogue as his earlier works, commenting on the critical effects of unsustainable and unchecked development most of us are witnessing in large cities close to us.

From the New World measures an impressive 26 feet wide by 13 feet tall. Not quite the same online, but check out his website to see some more details.

 

Check out this link:

 

Artist Profile: Yang Yongliang’s epic digital collage “From the New World”

Link

Mind-blowing modern Chinese digital art

 

Horse Training

 Source: yangyongliang.com

Broken Bridge

Source: yangyongliang.com

Horse-Herder

Source: yangyongliang.com

The Peach Blossom Colony

Source: yangyongliang.com

Enjoyment of the Moonlight

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Ode to the Goddess of Luo River

Source: yangyongliang.com

Appreciation of the Waterfall

Source: yangyongliang.com

The Mind Landscape of Xie Youyu

Source: yangyongliang.com

Lonely Angler

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Source: yangyongliang.com

Check out this link:

Mind-blowing modern Chinese digital art

Link

73-Year-old Japanese man creates impressive paintings using only Excel

Demilked.com: 

Meet Tatsuo Horiuchi, a 73-year-old Japanese, who creates highly detailed paintings with the most unexpected software – MS Excel. The newly discovered artist has been interested in graphic arts for a long time, but only since his retirement 13 years ago he finally got the time he needed for the new hobby.

Horiuchi has never used Excel at work and got interested in this particular software only for two reasons – it was more affordable than Photoshop (he had Excel preinstalled on his PC) and easier to use than MS Paint. Horiuchi’s artworks have already been presented in many exhibitions and the artist even won Excel Autoshape Art Contest in 2006.

Check out the raw Excel files here: Cherry Blossoms at Jogo Castle (2006) and Kegon Falls (2007)

Check out this link:

73-Year-old Japanese man creates impressive paintings using only Excel