Krispy Kreme Japan brings us more doughnut ice cream sundaes and sweet tea summertime treats!

KKD 1 top comboRocketNews 24:

 

Okay, when Krispy Kreme Japan came out with the sinfully delectable-looking doughnut ice cream sundaes in April this year, we kind of thought they were the dessert of our dreams. Well, the original doughnut ice cream sundaes we introduced to you in our previous article may be available only until July 14, but luckily for us, sweets makers and pastry chefs always seem to have a way of coming up with another new dream dessert.

This time, it’s still a lovely doughnut and ice cream creation, but in a new refreshing flavor with a Japanese twist — matcha green tea! And they also have other new delightful snacks and drinks as well that will all be coming out later this month, so let’s take a look at the new Krispy Kreme offerings, and hope the wait until they become available won’t drive us crazy!

As excited as we were about the caramel & yogurt and blueberry & yogurt ice cream sundaes that came out in April, this “Doughnut Ice Green Tea & Cookie” (450 yen [US$4.40]) also has to be a flavor we can look forward to. It’s made from Krispy Kreme’s signature original glazed doughnut served with green tea ice cream, topped with a smooth green tea jelly, green tea chocolate and crunchy cookie crumbles. If that description sounds delicious, we totally agree — it’s bound to satisfy with the aroma of green tea and the contrasting yet pleasant texture of the jelly and cookie crumbles.

 

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They also have three new doughnut flavors that look so tempting, you’ll be hard pressed to choose between them.

 

▼There’s the “Matcha Cookie Crunch” (230 yen [$2.25]), a beautifully colored doughnut creation covered with green tea chocolate and cocoa-flavored cookie crumbles and checkered with white and green tea chocolate. KKD 3 matcha cookie crunch resize

▼They also have the “Bergamot & Lemon Tea” doughnut (230yen), which is covered with tea-flavored jelly and chocolate, then artfully topped with pieces of orange peel and white chocolate stripes.KKD 4 donut bergamot and lemontea

▼And here’s the “Earl Grey Milk Tea Cake” doughnut (210 yen [$2]), made from dough containing earl grey tea leaves and covered with milk tea flavored chocolate topped with graham cookie crumbles. KKD 5 earlgrey mil tea

▼Just in case individual doughnuts aren’t enough for you, they also have a “Tea Time Dozen” pack (2,000 yen [$19.60]), which includes the three new doughnuts and the original glazed and mixed berry doughnuts as well — great for a summer tea party!KKD dozen

And if you need to take a break from the summer heat, they also have two cool refreshing Chiller flavors,the “Chillers Ice Uji Matcha Jelly” (right) and  the “Chillers Ice Peach Tea Yogurt” (left), both priced at 480 yen ($4.70). The Uji Matcha Jelly Chiller is a veritable green tea feast, a frozen green tea drink containing jelly made from premium green tea from the Uji area in Kyoto and green tea ice cream topped with green tea chocolate sauce and cocoa flavored cookie crumbles. The Peach Tea Yogurt Chiller is another scrumptious-looking frozen dessert drink containing peach purée sauce, earl grey tea and yogurt, as well as vanilla ice cream topped with peach sauce and graham cookie crumbles.

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Now, don’t all of these treats look amazing? We, for one, can’t wait to try them, and we don’t think you can blame us for feeling that way, especially after seeing these photos. The green tea flavored doughnut ice cream sundae and Chiller in particular should make for a refreshing summer dessert or snack, and they could well be a big hit since green tea sweets have always been popular in Japan. The new products will all be sold from July 15 to September 9, so here’s hoping we can all enjoy a cool and sweet summer!

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The history of Cambodian-owned donut shops

 

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Audrey:

You’re probably already aware that a large amount of independently-run donut shops in California are Cambodian-owned. What you may not know is that the donut shop industry is an integral part of the Cambodian immigration story.

In honor of National Donut day, we decided to look into the history of hardworking, Cambodian donut shop owners:

 

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1) You won’t find a donut in Cambodia.

Well, you can probably find a few donuts, but if you thought you’d find streets lined with donut shops in Cambodia, you’re in for a let-down. While donuts are a large part of the Cambodian American culture, many can tell you that this is purely an American tradition. Allegedly, there is only one donut shop in all of Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

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2) It all began with a man named Ted Ngoy.

Before donut shops were associated with the Cambodian American culture, there was Ted Ngoy paving the way. He arrived in the U.S. in 1975 and two years later, he begun his own donut shop. Clearly, his legacy continued.

 

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3) “The American Dream” 

Ngoy is the one who found a way for Cambodian immigrants to become part of the American dream of owning their own business,” said Dennis Wong of the Asian Business Association. “Taking a loan from an Asian loaning society, Ngoy was able to buy two stores, operate them for awhile and then sell to someone in the community or a family member who wanted to buy them. That’s how they got into it.

Italian immigrants are often working with restaurants, Indians with newsstands and hotels. With Cambodians, it happens to be donuts,” he said.

 

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4) Running a donut shop is hard work. 

You’ll often hear about these donut shops having only a few workers in order to save money. In fact, many of the workers are family members who must find time within their day to help the family business. As a result, many owners will work long and tiring hours to make sure their shop is functional. Additionally, many donut shop owners have voiced that the long hours have made it difficult to assimilate into a new society.

 

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5) They have thrived. 

An estimated 80% of donut shops in the Los Angeles area are owned by Cambodian Americans. In Houston, Texas, the percentage is an even larger 90%.

 

Check out this link:

The history of Cambodian-owned donut shops

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Krispy Kreme Japan debuts World Dulce Cup Donuts

 

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In honor of the upcoming World Cup, Krispy Kreme Japan has released a line of donuts celebrating six competing countries.

The themed half dozen features a different flavor for each country represented and are only available in the assortment, except for Japan’s Green Tea Cake which is a regular on Krispy Kreme Japan’s menu.

 

Brand Eating describes the new donuts in detail:

 

Brazil, Mango Passion: A yeast shell donut with a mango and passion fruit filling inside topped with a mango-flavored icing and a squiggle of white chocolate.

France, Creme Brûlée: Glazed Original topped with a custard creme, dark caramel sauce, and crispy bits of caramelized candy.

Italy, Tiramisu: a yeast shell donut with a mascarpone creme filling, topped with a zig-zaging pattern of coffee icing and a dusting of cocoa powder.

UK, Peach Melba: a yeast ring donut glazed with a pink peach-flavored icing, and finished with raspberry sauce, sliced roasted almonds, and dried cranberries.

US, Lemon Cheesecake: a yeast shell donut with a vanilla cream cheese filling, topped with a lemon creme and crushed graham crackers.

Japan, Matcha Old Fashioned: It’s an old-fashioned donut made with match (powdered green tea) and iced with green tea white chocolate.

 

All the flavors seem to represent their countries well, except for the US. Really Krispy Kreme? Lemon Cheesecake is the best you could come up with that screamed U.S.A.?

The donuts will be sold in a six-pack featuring the entire assortment for 1340 yen ($13.16 US) or you can get a dozen with two of each donut for 2000 yen ($19.64 US). These limited time donuts are only available until July 14.

 

 

Check out this link:

Krispy Kreme Japan debuts World Dulce Cup Donuts

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Gundam Donuts!

RocketNews 24:

 

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Despite the traditional image of anime fans as couch potatoes whose consumption of junk food is only rivaled by their consumption of panty-flashing animation sequences, it’s only recently that gastronomy and Japanese animation have officially combined forces. Recently we heard about the giant, 10-patty Attack on Titan burger, but what if your tastes run less towards towering monsters and meat and more in the direction of giant robots and sweets?

If that’s the case, maybe you’d prefer a Gundam donut.

These high-tech-looking pastries are available exclusively at the Gundam Cafe, which has branches in Tokyo Station, the Diver City shopping complex on Odaiba, the Aeon Mall Makuhari Shin Toshin, and anime haven Akihabara (of course).

The first of the two varieties is an edible recreation of the original heroic Gundam, the RX-78.

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The donut’s white chocolate coating matches the color scheme of its inspiration from the very first Mobile Suit Gundam TV series, which began airing way back in 1979. In the years since, the Gundam franchise has established a number of proud traditions, one of which is the hero being consistently upstaged by charismatic antagonist Char. Once again,Gundam’s villain gets the better of its hero, as the Char’s Custom Zaku donut is specced with a coating of strawberry chocolate, Japan’s current trendy flavor of the month which also shows up in Starbucks’ sakura lattes.

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Each of the donuts is priced at 320 yen (US$3.10). While you can get them at any Gundam Café, we recommend the Odaiba branch, so that you can munch on them while staring up at the giant 1:1 scale Gundam statue.

Related: Gundam Café
Source: IT Media
Images: Gundam Café

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Gundam Donuts!