Fish on new Yebisu “happy” beer cans changes colour when chilled

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RocketNews 24: (by Oona McGee)

In Japan, even beer cans have cute details.

Yebisu is one of Japan’s oldest beer brands, dating all the way back to 1887. Its well-known label features one of Japan’s Seven Lucky gods, Ebisu, the god of good luck, fishermen, and the ocean, who appears with a fishing rod in his right hand and a large red tai sea bream either tucked under his left arm or or dangling from his line.

And joining Ebisu for a limited time over the New Year period is a giant sea bream that changes from white to pink when chilled below 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit).

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The reason for the color-changing fish is all to do with bringing good luck, as Ebisu is known to do. Sea Bream, or tai in Japanese, is an impoortant component of traditional osechi New Year’s meals and is often eaten on festive occasions. Tai symbolises good fortune, both for its lucky red colouring and because tai forms part of the word medetai, which means happy or auspicious in Japanese.

▼ Rather than a bright red tai, the cans feature a large, pink “Sakura Tai”, which the company says is a good omen designed to bring joy and happiness.

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We’re not sure if it’s the lucky fish on the can or the liquid refreshment inside that brings the joy; perhaps it’s a combination of both! The company recommends drinking the beer at 4 to 6 degrees Celsius, which is what it will get down to after five to six hours in the fridge.

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Called the “Yebisu Medetai Can” or “Yebisu Happy Can”, these will be available around the country from today, 22 December.

Are you brave enough to try horse sashimi?

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Next Shark:

 

The greatest thing about sushi is the massive variety for foodies of all tastes. There are all kinds of raw fish, various fruits of the sea, as well as beef, but we bet there’s one kind you’ve never tried — horse meat sushi.

In the neighborhood of Ebisu in Shibuya, Japan, you won’t be able to miss the colorful rainbow of lights coming from Ebisu Yokocho, a food mall that has a wide variety of 21 different restaurants and bars.

 

 

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Inside, mouth-watering smells drift out of the numerous kitchens and mingle in the air with the laughter of customers sitting within an arm’s length of diners at different establishments.

Venture all the way to the back and you’ll find the restaurant Nikuzushi, which translates to “meat sushi.” Here, they specialize in raw horse meat sushi.

 

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The brave team at RocketNews24 gave horse meat sushi a try back in September. They ordered the chef’s recommendation that included back meat (nakaochi), lean meat (akami), belly meat (harami) and diced fatty meat with green onions wrapped in seaweed (negi toro).

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Each cut had its own unique charms, whether the chewy nakaochi, firm akami, subtle char of the seared harami, or flavorful kick of the negi toro. What they all shared, though, was an exquisite deliciousness, accented by the meat juices mixing with the warm vinegared rice.

 

Surprisingly, the horse meat actually comes from Canada. The owner of Nikuzushi, a Mr. Nakamura, told RocketNews24 that Canadian horse meat is reasonably priced, leaner, less gamey and apparently goes really well with sushi rice.

If horse meat sushi isn’t your thing though, Nikuzushi also has great quality beef on their menu too.

 

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Seared by Nakamura right before our eyes, the 680-yen cut is one of the pricier items on the menu. Juicy and so tender it melts in your mouth, it’s definitely worth that much, if not more, though.”

 

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So if you ever get tired of the same old spicy tuna or California rolls, would you be brave enough to ever try raw horse?

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Art News: EVISU (Japan) and D*Face partner for D*Face’s solo exhibition in Asia

 

Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia

Japanese denim label EVISU will be launching a special capsule to tie in with D*Face’s solo exhibition in Asia. There, the British contemporary artist presented his visual commentary on the endless feed of information and images directed at society. The result was his signature comic-style blend of these images and elements of the artist’s subconscious.

With both parties sharing similar attitudes for subverting and reinterpreting the established, the limited-edition collection combines playful images of Ebisu, the Japanese god of prosperity with D*Face’s iconic D*Dog character.

For those in the area, the artist’s original artwork will remain on display at EVISU’s Hong Kong flagship store until June 16.

 

EVISU Hong Kong
60 Wellington street
Central
Hong Kong

 

Check out this link:

 

Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia
Image of EVISU x D*Face Partner for D*Face's Solo Exhibition in Asia

 

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Lady Gaga shoe designer opens Tokyo art space

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Noritaka Tatehana is famous for handcrafting towering sculptural footwear, sans heels, for the likes of fashion-forward stars such as Lady Gaga. Now, the Japanese shoe designer is taking steps in a different direction – by launching a new art gallery space in Tokyo.

Pocket, Mr. Tatehana’s art space, opens Thursday in the capital’s Ebisu district alongside a new branch of hip Tokyo shoe shop T6M.

Directed and curated by Mr. Tatehana, it will focus on showcasing young Japanese creators, a mission the designer calls “my personal dream.”

This is something that is separate from my shoe making,” he says. “All the artists exhibiting at the gallery will be modern Japanese artists – painters, illustrators, manga artists, graphic designers, sculptors – whose works contain an element of Japanese tradition and culture.”

Mr. Tatehana, 28, is widely regarded as one of Japan’s most promising young shoe designers, not least thanks to fans like Lady Gaga (she has already bought 25 pairs of his shoes, according to him).

The shoes are not just about show-stopping statements: they are painstakingly handcrafted using an array of Japanese artisan techniques, a reflection of Mr. Tatenaha having spent years studying traditional dying and weaving methods at university.

Pocket is diminutive in size, as its name suggests – it measures about four square meters and sits in a quiet corner of the T6M store.

Exhibitions will change every three months, starting with inaugural show “The Daughters” – the same name as Mr. Tatehana’s high-profile new sneaker collaboration with Yoichiro Kitadate, Japan’s celebrated sports footwear design guru, which launched over the summer.

The show will include poster-themed artworks by komtena, an illustrator and graphic designer renowned for his intricate mechanical motifs, and Nobuki Kato, the Hiroshima-born manga artist.

I want to educate people about the young talented creators that exist in Japan and help these artists to raise their profile and earn a living from their work,” says Mr. Tatehana.

Check out this link:

Lady Gaga shoe designer opens Tokyo art space

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