Air Jordan 1 China-only Charlotte Hornets “Feng Shui” release

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Hypebeast:

As we all know, Michael Jordan is the majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets, and as a result, we get to see some pretty fly Air Jordans inspired by the franchise.

This time around, the iconic Air Jordan 1 features a wonderful combination of purple, teal and white, making for a solid drop. Unfortunately however, this is slated to be a China-only release, which is why the brand has opted for a rather peculiar nickname for this model, considering it’s colorway.

Feng Shui is a “Chinese term that translates to wind-water in English, and is a philosophical system of uniting the mind, body and soul with the surrounding environment,” says Sole Collector.

The Air Jordan 1 “Feng Shui” will hit select Chinese stockists starting October 10.

A home consultation by Hong Kong’s hippest feng shui master

Coconuts Hong Kong:

Those unacquainted with feng shui may think it involves little more than furniture arrangement – interior design with a spiritual twist, if you will.

But Thierry Chow, arguably Hong Kong’s hippest feng shui master at age 27, is determined to bring a more modern and approachable feng shui to the public.

In this Coconuts TV video she visits the home of Coconuts Hong Kong‘s Associate Editor Laurel Chor and gives some feng shui advice.

Feng Shui: How a 2000-year-old Chinese art can make you more productive

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RocketNews 24/Business Insider:

When Anthony Minko was designing his new office in Brooklyn, the estate planning attorney knew that it needed to feel calm and supportive. After all, a place where people talked about what will happen after they die should feel secure.

So Minko — who had studied the spend idly slow martial art tai chi — hired RD Chin, a New-York based feng shui architect.

The whole process started with our values in the law firm,” Minko said said, “how we care about keeping families together across the generations, where grandparents can come with children and grandchildren.”

“What surprised me was how practical the feng shui principles were,” he said.

Literally translating as wind-water from Chinese, feng shui has been practiced for at least 1700 years in Asia before becoming popular in the US in the 1980s.

Chin, whose lectures are on YouTube, argues that everybody can sense feng shui — it’s simply the how-it-feels quality of being in a place. If you feel inspired, creative, and capable in an office, then it’s got some positive feng shui going on, but if you feel trapped, blocked, and insecure, then it’s some poor feng shui, and your productivity will suffer as a result.

Vancouver-based feng shui consultant Rodika Tchi said that feng shui is “acupuncture for a space,” a way of increasing the sense of harmony in a room.

So how can we use these principles to improve our work spaces? Here are some tips from Chin and Tchi:

  • Pay attention to the quality of air. 

In most businesses, somehow we overlook the quality of air,” Tschi said, because “we get used to poor quality air very quickly.”

This is insane, given that the EPA estimates that indoor air is two to five times more polluted than outdoor air.

That’s where plants come in, she said, citing NASA’s list of the most air-purifying plants, like the areca palm and Boston fern.

Any business can have plants,” she said.

It doesn’t require anything new agey, you don’t need to run out and buy a set of healing crystals.

“Just to starting to pay attention to the air will do wonders,” Tchi said. “You have to be aware of what you’re inhaling, what you’re feeding your brain.”

  • Then improve your light. 

Light is nutrition,” Tchi said.

Most of us are malnourished.

Because while direct sunlight gives you 100,000 lux, or units of luminance, office lighting only provides around 500 lux.

The solution — beyond going for a walk — is to install “full spectrum” lights in your office, which are more nourishing than fluorescent lights, which have been shown to make you feel less alert and screw with your quality of sleep.

If you can’t control the overhead lights, then add a nice incandescent to your desk.

  • If possible, give your desk a “commanding position.” 

In feng shui, the commanding position is where you have your back to the wall and your face to the door, so you know who’s coming and going.

You want to position your desk so that you feel very safe, very protected,” Chin said. “You want to position your desk so you can see out the window and see who’s in front of you. People coming behind you creates a lot of distraction — you can get the feeling of being attacked, feeling of someone looking over your shoulder.”

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  • And something to look at. 

You reduce stress by looking out the window,” Chin said, “because physiologically your eyes relax when you look out into the distance. That’s why you feel so great looking at the ocean — you can see a long, almost infinite distance into the horizon.”

So the obvious application is to make sure you can see out your window. If you don’t have ready access to a window, then make a window to another world: put a painting or a photo on your wall so you can stare “into the distance.” If you work in a windowless space, put a mirror up, since Chin said it will expand the space.

For managers, taking care of feng shui is way of investing in your team.

Ideally, a successful business has people who are energized,” Tchi said, “and there’s no way to have that unless you have a space that supports that energy. You can use feng shui to support that human well-being, creativity, and talent. If you put people in a space that has no light, no color, no images, you can’t expect that energy from them.”

Link

Architecture: Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completed in Guangzhou

A skyscraper shaped like a giant doughnut has been completed by Italian architect Joseph di Pasquale in Guangzhou, China.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

Located on the edge of the Pearl River, the 138-metre Guangzhou Circle was designed by Di Pasquale of Milan studio AM Project to provide an iconic headquarters for Chinese companies Guangdong Hongda Xingye Group and GDPE Guangdong Plastic Exchange.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The architectural concept is for a building that will be immediately perceived as a native Chinese landmark using a closed and central structure instead of the usual western skyscrapers stereotype,”said the architect.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

A circle with a 50-metre diameter punctures the heart of the 33-storey structure, turning the building into a hollow circle. When reflected in the river, this shape becomes a figure of eight – a lucky number in Chinese culture.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

[It] is inspired by the strong iconic value of jade discs and numerological tradition of feng shui, in particular, the double disc of jade (bi-disk) is the royal symbol of ancient Chinese dynasty that reigned in this area around 2000 years ago,” said Di Pasquale.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

This figure also corresponds to the number eight and infinity symbol that in Chinese culture have a strong propitiatory value,” he added.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The front and rear walls of the building are clad with copper plates, while the curved side walls are broken down into glazed rectilinear boxes.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

Elevated gardens are located within the central void.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

Here’s a project description from Joseph di Pasquale:


Guangzhou Circle (Canton), China

On December 16th 2013 the completion ceremony of the Guangzhou Circle Mansion had taken place in Guangzhou, China. It’s the Headquarter of Guangdong Hongda Xingye Group and the venue of GDPE Guangdong Plastic Exchange, the world largest stock exchange for raw plastic material with more then 40 billions euros of annual turn over.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

Local and Italian authorities will attend the ceremony including the Italian General Consul in Guangzhou mr Benedetto Latteri and the scientific responsible of the Italian Embassy in Beijing, mr Giuseppe Rao.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The building has been designed by the Italian architect Joseph di Pasquale and his professional practice AM project from Milan that has been the winning proposal of the international architectural competition held in 2009. The total height is 138 mt for 33 floors, 85.000 square meters of floor area and about 50 million euros of global investment. The inner hole is a unique space that has no equal in the world with its almost fifty meters of diameter (48 mt).

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The architectural concept intends to design landmark building that will be immediately perceived as a native Chinese Landmark Building using a closed and central structure instead of the usual western skyscrapers stereotype. Therefore the architecture is fully defined, and iconic, very close to the Chinese way of perceiving and understanding. It’s a sort of “urban logo” that works as a landmark in the same way that ideograms are used in the Chinese writing, instead of the alphabet.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The architectural concept is inspired by the strong iconic value of jade discs and numerological tradition of feng shui. In particular, the double disc of jade (bi-disk) is the royal symbol of ancient Chinese dynasty that reigned in this area around 2000 years ago. The building reflected in the water of the river creates exactly the same image: a double jade disc.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

This figure also corresponds to the number 8 and infinity symbol that Chinese culture has a strong propitiatory value. Just remember how the date and time of the start of the Beijing Olympics was for the same reason fixed to 8:08 am of the ‘8-8-2008.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou
But the building is also a clear reference to the theme dear to the Italian Renaissance “quadratura del cerchio” (squaring the circle). The two circular facades in fact contain and support suspended groups of storeys that are actually “squaring” the perfect circumference of the facades in order to make the interior space orthogonal and habitable.
Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou
Front elevation – click for larger image

The 33 floors are grouped to create two rows of volumes blocks that appears from the side of the building and are progressively pushed out till an extreme 25 meters cantilever. The main interior space is the exchange hall that is located just lower then the central hole of the building. This is the heart of the entire complex and of the entire company.

Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completes in Guangzhou

The initial structural concept has been developed and tested at the wind gallery of Polytechnic of Milan, and the structural calculations and final test has been developed by the South China University of Technology (SCUT) in Guangzhou.

Check out this link:

Architecture: Doughnut-shaped skyscraper completed in Guangzhou

Link

10 Corso Como Shanghai

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Milan’s legendary concept store 10 Corso Como has finally arrived on the shores of Mainland China. Dubbed by some the “Champs Elysees of China”, Nanjing West Road is Shanghai’s snazziest shopping street and the new home of Carla Sozzani’s fourth and latest concept shop.

The four-storied store boasts 2,500 square meters of open retail space and was designed by American artist Kris Ruhs with careful observation to ancient eastern details like Feng Shui–which explains why the building’s fourth story has been labeled the fifth (the inauspicious number “four” sounds like “death” in Mandarin).

This store features brands from big names like Fendi and Lanvin to Martin Margiela and various niche designers each month.

Check out this link:

10 Corso Como Shanghai