New font incorporates English pronunciations into Japanese katakana

Dramafever:

A U.K. company named Johnson Banks has come with an ingenious way to include English pronunciation in Japanese katakana characters. The company has dubbed this new font cleverly as “Phonetikana,” where each katakana character featured a few English letters to help English speakers say the word properly.

The company started incorporating the new font in simple words like “banana” and “tomato” but also showed what longer phrases such as the “sound of something spinning” would look like. The first simple example that company showed is the katakana characters for Uniqlo versus the new Phonetikana.

It’s a really brilliant idea, and I’m sure it will be incredibly helpful for so many people who are trying to learn Japanese.

The name Michael

Uniqlo 

Uniqlo in Phonetikana

Niko Niko=smile

 ˜Doki Doki =the sound of my heart beating

Kuru Kuru=˜sound of something spinning

Cheese=Group Photo

Tomato=tomato

Toppu banana=top banana

Biggu Appuru=big apple

Video

Design: The Noramoji Project

The city is a typeface jungle, and three Japanese friends venture far and wide to find and recreate the most unique specimens. Scouring the streets for noramoji – or “stray text” – Rintaro Shimohama, Naoki Nishimura and Shinya Wakaoka locate quirky letterforms on charming corner stores, retro barber shops, and old-school local haunts. Analyzing the shape, scale, and weight of the letters they encounter, they then create a full digital set of characters that capture the distinct personalities of the found text.

On one hand a ‘typogeographic’ excursion, the Noramoji project also encourages support for local businesses and honors the creative assets found within a community. The typefaces that the trio create are made available for download for a small donation, and all proceeds go to the business owners whose signs they fontify. By refreshing unusual, aged letterforms and reworking them into profitable economic assets, noramoji represent a unique form of creative reuse that animates lost, forgotten, and found art – and proves that Helvetica may be a bit less ubiquitous than we thought.