15 of the most amazing home-made robots, tanks, and vehicles in China

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RocketNews 24:

China is known as an industrious nation and, after pictures surfaced of one Chinese teacher who built a phenomenal “Iron Man” Hulkbuster replica in his garage, it seemed like the right time to take a look at some of the country’s most impressive home made inventions.

From full size, working airplanes to wooden, yet electronic cars, the Chinese have spent anything from a couple of months to several years, knocking up some pretty impressive modes of transports and robots.

Liu Fulong from the Shenyang, Liaoning province created a wooden electronic vehicle at home, which has a top speed of 30km/h.liu-fulong-from-the-shenyang-liaoning-province-created-a-wooden-electronic-vehicle-at-home-which-has-a-top-speed-of-30kmh

Yu Jietao, 26-year-old wood carver, also saw the potential in wooden vehicles and spent 100,000 yuan (£10,247, $16,010) on his invention. It can travel as fast as 30 km/h per hour.yu-jietao-26-year-old-wood-carver-also-saw-the-potential-in-wooden-vehicles-and-spent-100000-yuan-10247-16010-on-his-invention-it-can-travel-as-fast-as-30-kmh-per-hour

In the Shiyan, Hubei province, Su Daocheng spent two months building a home made mechanical horse to travel around in.in-the-shiyan-hubei-province-su-daocheng-spent-two-months-building-a-home-made-mechanical-horse-to-travel-around-in

A man only identified as Abulajon, in the Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region in China, spent 8000 yuan (£820, $1300) to create the 0.3 tonnes motorcycle. However, measuring 14 feet (4.3 metres) in length and 7.8 feet (2.4 metres) in height, makes it impossible for him to drive it on the street.a-man-only-identified-as-abulajon-in-the-xinjiang-uighur-autonomous-region-in-china-spent-8000-yuan-820-1300-to-create-the-03-tonnes-motorcycle-however-measuring-14-feet-43-metres-in-length-and-78-feet-24-metres-in-height-makes-it-impossibl

He Liang went for the minimalist option and spent a decade turning a suitcase into a motor-driven vehicle. It has a top speed of 20km/h.he-liang-went-for-the-minimalist-option-and-spent-a-decade-turning-a-suitcase-into-a-motor-driven-vehicle-it-has-a-top-speed-of-20kmh

Here, an unidentified man from the Heilongjiang province created a home made 12 brooms tied in the rear to help him clean the road in Mohe.
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Yang Shijun, a 45-year-old manager of a construction material company, spent 100,000 yuan (£10,228, $16,098) and one year of his time to make this plane. Yang said he made it as a tribute to his father who passed away in 2011 but had been a pilot for 29 years.yang-shijun-a-45-year-old-manager-of-a-construction-material-company-spent-100000-yuan-10228-16098-and-one-year-of-his-time-to-make-this-plane-yang-said-he-made-it-as-a-tribute-to-his-father-who-passed-away-in-2011-but-had-been-a-pilot-for-
Meanwhile, Liu Shijie, a 35-year-old farmer from the Huaibei, Anhui province, took six months and spent 30,000 yuan (£3,074, $4,850) to make a homemade armoured vehicle.meanwhile-liu-shijie-a-35-year-old-farmer-from-the-huaibei-anhui-province-took-six-months-and-spent-30000-yuan-3074-4850-to-make-a-homemade-armoured-vehicle

Another farmer, Zhang Wuyi, 37, created a multi-seater submarine at home to help harvest aquatic products, such as sea cucumber. He sold his invention to sold to a businessman in Dalian at a price of 100,000 yuan (£10,248, $15,855) in 2014.another-farmer-zhang-wuyi-37-created-a-multi-seater-submarine-at-home-to-help-harvest-aquatic-products-such-as-sea-cucumber-he-sold-his-invention-to-sold-to-a-businessman-in-dalian-at-a-price-of-100000-yuan-10248-15855-in-2014

Yang Zongfu spent two years creating a ball container named Noah’s Ark of China. It is capable of housing a three-person family and sufficient enough food for them to live for 10 months.yang-zongfu-spent-two-years-creating-a-ball-container-named-noahs-ark-of-china-it-is-capable-of-housing-a-three-person-family-and-sufficient-enough-food-for-them-to-live-for-10-months

Tan Yong, a 44-year-old farmer, created a home-made submarine at a lake in Dangjiangkou, Hubei province. He spent five months building it and now it is capable of diving to a depth of 10 metres.tan-yong-a-44-year-old-farmer-created-a-home-made-submarine-at-a-lake-in-dangjiangkou-hubei-province-he-spent-five-months-building-it-and-now-it-is-capable-of-diving-to-a-depth-of-10-metres

Farmer Wu Yulu started to build robots in 1986 and, by 2009, he unveiled this rickshaw that is being pulled by a robot.farmer-wu-yulu-started-to-build-robots-in-1986-and-by-2009-he-unveiled-this-rickshaw-that-is-being-pulled-by-a-robot

In Beijing, self-taught inventor Tao Xiangli spent less than a year and 300,000 yuan (£30,750, $49,037) to create a home made humanoid robot with a remote controller. However, it is too heavy and too tall to walk out of his front door.china-invention-8

Xing Yile (L), a 26-year-old middle school art teacher, took two months to build a homemade replica of the Hulkbuster “Iron Man” armoured suit from the movie “Avengers: Age of Ultron.”xing-yile-l-a-26-year-old-middle-school-art-teacher-took-two-months-to-build-a-homemade-replica-of-the-hulkbuster-iron-man-armoured-suit-from-the-movie-avengers-age-of-ultron

A man in China identified only as “Xing” made this suit in a parking lot.

Meanwhile, Li Lei from Shanghai builds an array of “Transformers” robot replicas for rent and for sale.meanwhile-li-lei-from-shanghai-builds-an-array-of-transformers-robot-replicas-for-rent-and-for-sale

Business_Insider

Spooky unfinished theme park in Wuhan re-discovered by tourists

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Shanghaiist (by Liam Bourke):

In a country where tacky copy-cat monuments are commonplace and grandiose architectural ambitions regularly turn to dust, it should come as no surprise to see the two collide in photos taken by tourists at an abandoned amusement park in Wuhan, Hubei province.

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Construction on the “Universal Park” began in 1996 and ceased in 1999 due to a lack of funds and an unforeseen transportation dilemma.

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Some 16 years after it was deserted, tourists have returned to the eerily overgrown theme park to take wedding photos and enjoy camping and picnicking against the sightly incongruous backdrop of mock Egyptian pyramids and hieroglyphic-inscripted temples.

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A tourist poses for a selfie with what looks like a post-apocalyptic Hogwarts castle.

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The rise of creepy ghost-towns across China has accompanied China’s economic boom, as its often over-zealous urban expansionism has allowed for lavishly immoderate designs which were found to be totally superfluous in reality. If you need proof, check out China’s largest shopping mall which remained 99 percent empty seven years after it opened.

Hopefully, however, this aborted wonder can still be a Mecca for tourists (or hermits) and avoids the fate of the attempted “Wonderland Amusement Park” in Beijing, which was demolished 15 years after construction began in 2013.

 

China’s first over-water highway almost complete

RocketNews 24:

If you’re like me, you’re probably more accustomed to seeing bridges cross rivers rather than run along their length. But this stretch of highway which was recently completed in Xingshan County of China’s Hubei Province does just that. Are the bridge’s creators crazy, or crazy like an ecologically minded fox?

The complete road runs about 10.5km (6.5mi) connecting Xingshan County with the Yiba Expressway.

Of the full roadway about 4km (2.5mi) runs over a mountain stream. It’s said that this was done to protect the environment by avoiding cutting through the forest or mountain itself.

The above-water stretch of highway cost about 2 million yuan (US$320,000) which was nearly half of the 4.4 million yuan ($700,000) it cost to build the entire thing.

In addition to not disturbing the landscape of the mountain it also provides motorists with a gorgeous view as they pass through.

Comments from Chinese readers about the road were mixed, with some celebrating this first-of-its-kind bridge as “an example of harmony between people and nature.

Many others questioned whether this plan was truly more environmentally sound than other methods – such as tunneling through the mountain – or simply cheaper.

There were also those who questioned the safety of such a bridge, but we will have to see how it fares when it opens to the public sometime in early 2015.

Dalian Wanda sneaks peek at theme park in Wuhan

Dailan Wanda sneeks peek at new

Variety:

China’s giant property and entertainment conglomerate Dalian Wanda Group has raised the curtain – a little bit – on its new multi-billion dollar theme park and theater developments in Wuhan Nov. 7 as it expands its presence across the country while continuing to stretch its reach around the globe.

Steered by China’s second-richest man Wang Jianlin, the company in 2012 purchased AMC Entertainment, thereby staking its claim to be the world’s largest cinema operator, while it has recently announced billion-dollar plans to establish facilities in Hollywood and Australia.

But the developments in Wuhan — which will be officially opened Dec. 20 — reflect the current shift in China towards “internal consumption,”according to Tang Jun, vice president of the Beijing Wanda Cultural Industry Group.

Tang said it was thought that “entertainment and leisure could be one of the major drivers” of this economic trend in China, which has been a mantra pushed by China President Xi Jinping

This development is unprecedented in China,” claimed Tang. “It’s a combination of culture with high technology. That’s the charter.”

A small group of select guests were treated Nov. 7 to a sneak preview of the attractions being fine-tuned in Wuhan, while also taking in behind-the-scenes tours of the sprawling buildings that will house them.

Mark Fisher — the British artistic director of the Beijing and London Olympics who passed away in June — designed the Han Show Theatre based on a traditional glowing Chinese red lantern, and the Wanda Movie Park, which covers an areas of 100,000 square meters, from the shape of China’s Chu-Han culture’s ancient bells.

Opening next month, the “The Han Show,” created by theatrical director Franco Dragone, will be staged in the custom-build theater that carries its name while the Wanda Movie Park — Wanda is claiming it’s the world’s first indoor movie theme park — will boast six major attractions developed with the likes of Industrial Light & Magic, as well as retail and dining outlets.

Tang said Wuhan, one of China’s “second-tier” cities with a population of around 10.2 million, capital of the Hubei province and situated in the center of the country, had been earmarked for cultural development due to its rich heritage, which dates back to 1500 BC. Its East Lake was a favored holiday destination for China’s former leader Mao Tse-tung.

But Tang said the plan was to also establish a “new image” for Wuhan.

To that end, the two theater and theme park facilities are supplemented by Han Street: a retail, dining and entertainment district that Wanda says has attracted an average of more than 300,000 visitors per day since opening in September 2011. Han Street now comes surrounded by a growing number of commercial buildings and towering condominiums, with the hope that sales of flats within them will offset some of the overall cost of the project. There are also hotels around the developments, including the five-star Wanda Reign, which sits next to the Han Show Theatre.

Wanda is also hoping crowds will flock to the site to take in attractions at the Wanda Movie Park, and guests Nov. 7 tested out the Hubei in the Air flight simulation ride that flies guests through the province’s spectacular sites. Other attractions set to open next month include a 3D Journey to the West interactive ride/game.

We think (capacity) will be about 8,000 people at one time. During the first year we are projecting three million visitors and for revenue RMB800 million ($130.6 million),” said Aaron Soo, Wanda Movie Park’s general manager, who estimated the movie park alone would cost his company around RMB4.2 billion ($685 million) when completed. No official estimate of the amount Dalian Wanda Group has spent was offered.

Dragone is also fine-tuning “The Han Show” with the help of costume designer Tim Yip (“Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) and Nov. 7 presented a series of small live excepts from the show to guests. “The Han Show” is looking to build on the success Dragone and his team have had in the southern Chinese gambling hub of Macau with “The House of Dancing Water,” which has met with great success since opening at the City of Dreams casino resort in 2010.

Although not giving too much away, Dragone explained his production would reflect how young Chinese people today are facing up to their future, told through the story of a teenage couple.

I will never have enough in seven lives to learn about the grandeur of this country,” said Dragone, the former Cirque du Soleil creative director who branched out on his own in 2000. “But I have always tried to find a language that can talk to everybody.

The Dalian Wanda Group has plans for 13 major theme parks over the next three years including a film studio and theme park complex in Qingdao, which will host a film festival starting in 2017.

It also has plans to establish a further 200 smaller “Baby King” theme parks specifically for younger children across China over the next few years.

As well as the acquisition of AMC Entertainment —which pushed its reach to more than 6,000 screens globally — the company has thrown its financial weight behind a series of major productions in recent years, among them Jackie Chan’s “Police Story 2013” and the 3D martial arts fantasy hit “The Monkey King: Uproar in Heaven,” starring Chow Yun-fat and Donnie Yen.

Link

Photos of the Day: Hubei school holds midterms in forest to prevent cheating

 

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Shanghaiist:

A high school in Jingzhou, central China‘s Hubei Province held one class’ mid-term exams at a nearby forest rather than in their classroom this past week in a pretty far-reaching attempt to avoid plagiarism among students.

One of the teachers explained that this was the first time the school decided to hold exams outside but hoped that the good weather would help students’ performance.

Check out this link:

Photos of the Day: Hubei school holds midterms in forest to prevent cheating

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Judging by the three teachers who appear to be vigilantly pacing between students, perhaps the long-distant desk separation was a necessary call.