Stephen Colbert interviews Terence Tao, the “Smartest Man In The World”

 
Stephen Colbert interviews Terence Tao (born 17 July 1975, Adelaide) a Chinese-American mathematician . He became the youngest person there ever promoted to full professor at the age of 24 . Terry’s IQ has been assessed as between 230 and 240 .

Model suing after Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic’s ad turns into a cruel meme on, claims it ruined her life

Model Heidi Yeh posed for this image which was to be used in an ad campaign for a cosmetic surgery clinic. However, an internet user gave it a different caption and turned it into a meme which spread like wildfire

Daily Mail UK (by Siofra Brennan):

A model who starred in an advert for plastic surgery says her life has been ruined after her image was turned into a notorious internet meme that went global.

Heidi Yeh, from Taiwan, is suing the clinic for damages after she posed alongside a male model as the beautiful parents of three aesthetically-challenged children. Their features were digitally altered to make their eyes look small and their noses flat, and the original caption read: ‘The only thing you’ll ever have to worry about is how to explain it to the kids.’

However, the photo made its way onto the internet where it was turned into a meme with the caption, ‘Plastic Surgery: You can’t hide it forever.

In an emotional interview with the BBC’s Cindy Sui, Heidi said that losing control of the image has ruined her career and her personal life.

A boyfriend split up with her because of the constant embarrassing rumors about her, and she had to endure people gossiping about her in the street.

I’ve broken down many times crying and I haven’t been able to sleep,’ she confessed.

The biggest loss for me is I don’t want to be a model anymore. Just because I’m a model, people can hurt me like this and I can’t fight back. I just want to hide.

Heidi, who had previously modeled for fast food chain KFC and Japanese beauty brands, originally posed for the shoot back in 2012.

It was intended to be used as part of a campaign for a Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic.

Heidi insists that her modeling agency signed a contract with US-based international advertising agency J Walter Thompson (JWT), stating that the image would only be used by one clinic in Taiwan. The agreement also allegedly ensured that her photograph could only be reproduced in newspapers and magazines. However, JWT subsequently allowed another plastic surgery provider called Simple Beauty to use the image.

They also posted it on their Facebook page, and it quickly spread across the internet. The image was turned into various memes all poking fun at the people featured.

To make matters worse, a Chinese newspaper then used it to illustrate a fake story about a man who became suspicious about his wife’s looks after she gave birth to ugly children. He then discovered she’d had cosmetic surgery before they met and decided to sue her for deceiving him.

When I first heard about this from a friend, I thought it was just a one-off rumor,’ said Ms Yeh.

Then I realised the whole world was spreading it and in different languages. People actually thought it was real. Even my then-boyfriend’s friends would ask about it.

As well as the impact on her personal life, she said her modeling career went downhill because of her notoriety.

People refused to believe that I had never had plastic surgery,’ she said.

Clients would ask me if I was the woman in the picture. After this, I only got small roles in advertisements.’

She says she’s lost around $4million new Taiwan dollars – the equivalent of £80,000 or $150,000 US dollars – in earnings because of the meme. Despite repeated attempts by Heidi and her modeling agency, she only recently managed to get the clinic and JWT to remove the image from their websites.

She says they only acted after she made a threat to sue both companies at a press conference. Now, she’s pressing ahead with her claim and is demanding $5million new Taiwan dollars in damages. However she insists that money is not her priority, and that she just wants people to know the truth about the image.

A spokesperson for JWT told FEMAIL the campaign was created to ‘promote plastic surgery services in a humorous manner.

He said the company own all the rights to the photo including copyright, giving them full rights to edit, modify and use the image.

Our campaign was created for print publication in the Taiwan market. With technology, smart phone cameras and social media, however, even a print ad can go viral,’ he said.

We can’t anticipate what degree an impact it will have, how people will view it, and what they will do with it.’

But Heidi’s lawyer Chang Yu-chi said: ‘

We gave you the copyright and the right to edit it, but we didn’t give you the right to let another company use it, and to use it online.’

Margaret Cho slams SNL for inviting Donald Trump to host

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OUT.com: 

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump is set to host Saturday Night Live next month, a move that has left many people outraged. Comedian Margaret Cho joined the foray, slamming producers for inviting a “known racist” to participate while failing for decades to promote true racial equality.

Taking aim, Cho said:

Why has there never been an Asian-American host, cast member or musical guest on ‘SNL’ in 41 years? Forty-one years. Yet they want Donald Trump, a known racist, a known sexist, who disgustingly wants to have sex with his daughter. Who does he think he is, Woody Allen?”

“People come at me and say, ‘Oh, Fred Armisen is a quarter Japanese, Rob Schneider is half Filipino.’ Yeah, that makes three-quarters of an Asian-American, not even in one person, in 41 years.

Cho went on to suggest herself as a musical guest and Ken Jeong and George Takei as potential hosts.

How America’s first 3 star Michelin sushi chef, Masa Takayama, serves his sushi

Eater’s Kat Odell visited America’s first 3 star Michelin sushi chef, Masa Takayama, to see how the eponymous chef serves his sushi. Having cut fish for three decades in his restaurant Masa in New York City, and having shaped American sushi culture like no other, we get a detailed look at how the chef serves his dishes and why they are served the way they are.

The restaurant is also America’s most expensive, offering a truly classic Japanese omakase experience with a twist.

The son of China’s richest man reveals the truth behind why gaming is so popular in China

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Next Shark:

Wang Sicong, the son of China’s richest man, usually says exactly what is on his mind, except that in a frank interview with the BBC for their three-part documentary series about Chinese youth, he’s addressing a different, more controversial subject: China’s government.

In the interview for the first installment of the channel’s “Secrets of China,” Wang says that trying to escape the country’s system would be “suicide” and that “there is really no way of succeeding outside the system.”

Wang, who was educated in the UK, is the son of Wang Jianlian, the founder of Chinese retail, real estate and movie theater conglomerate Dalian Wanda. He has an estimated net worth of $25.9 billion.

When asked in the interview about how Chinese children grow up to be individuals despite the country’s strict government, the 27-year-old Wang, an avid gamer and the owner of e-sports team Invictus Gaming, said:

“The state chooses what’s mainstream, and you have to conform to that. If your ideals are not mainstream, then you’re wrong. But of course, everyone has their own ideas, so what they do is they put on a mask and they go forward in life with the mask. Why is online gaming becoming so popular in China? Because once you go online you can take off that mask and say whatever you really think instead of what is mainstream.”

Asked about China’s lack of freedom, Wang said:

“I think at some point you just accept it. That’s why you don’t see many people protesting in China, I suppose … because they realize — some point in time, some point in (their social) class — that even by protesting they can’t change much.”

Wang’s interview with the BBC can be watched in full below.

Soho House Interview: Chef May Chow and Little Bao (Hong Kong)

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Soho House: 

Chef May Chow pairs traditional ingredients from Hong Kong with Western cooking techniques to create her stuffed, steamed buns – fans queue around the block for the slow-braised pork belly bao, served with leek and shiso red onion salad and hoisin ketchup.

We sat down with Chow to find out more:

Q: Where’s the best place to eat in Hong Kong right now and what is your favorite dish on the menu?

A: I love The Chairman because of my favourite dish, which is steamed crab with aged Shoaxing wine, chicken oil and flat rice noodles.

Q: How did you get to where you are today and who inspired you?

A: I had a very singular vision about the kind of food I wanted to cook and who I wanted to be very early on in my career. I have to thank Matt Abergel (owner of Hong Kong’s Yardbird) because without his guidance during my restaurant development, Little Bao wouldn’t have been possible. He was honest when he believed something wasn’t good enough and I trusted his opinion.

Q: Tell us about Little Bao and the inspiration behind it.

A: Little Bao is my life translated into a restaurant. It takes inspiration from the best of both Chinese and American culture but most importantly it’s a place to have fun – so expect good food; loud, upbeat music and great cocktails.

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Q: How has your background influenced your cooking?

A: I grew up in a traditional Chinese family and I’m influenced by Chinese culture. When I moved to the US, I was influenced by the freedom of speech and, of course, the food. My cooking draws on both cultures and I love taking traditional ingredients and putting an original spin on them.

Q: What made you decide to open your own restaurant and how did you go about launching it, finding funding and finding the perfect venue?

A: I always knew that I wanted to be a restaurant owner because I felt I had a story to tell through food. The opportunity came when I was offered a booth at a market. The response was great and I started to daydream about opening a restaurant.

I developed a business plan and gained financial support from my family and friends. We scouted for a Hong Kong location for over six months and I ended up taking over a space that was occupied by a hideous Thai restaurant. That was the first right decision I made because it was in my favorite neighborhood in Hong Kong.

Q: Have you ever faced any sexism in the industry?

A: I’m such a positive and happy person that I don’t feel that I’ve ever felt discriminated against, especially in a city like Hong Kong. I am quite an empowered woman and I generally see sexism as ignorance but I don’t experience much of it.

Q: What advice would you give to other pop-ups who are looking to launch their own restaurant?

A: I started as a chef working in restaurants, so my story is slightly different because I already had a basic understanding of the DNA needed for a successful restaurant.

The first step is to develop a detailed business plan and have legitimate solutions for all the questions that crop up. How do you make sure there is consistency in your service, food and experience? Have you developed your service manual? How will you make sure food and drink cost is controlled? Where is the best location for your target market? Who is your target market? Who is your competitor? What is your PR and marketing strategy? What music should you play? How much funding do you need?

Most importantly, though, listen to the people who will provide you smart insight.

Q: How do you think the London food scene measures up to Hong Kong?

A: Both Hong Kong and London have great food scenes but I think while Hong Kong offers the best of every type of Chinese cuisine, London has a bigger array, from great modern British food like St. John and Gordon Ramsey to fantastic Middle Eastern and Indian cuisines. London also has a wonderful farmer driven open market that Hong Kong doesn’t have.