Disney’s “Big Hero 6” receives Golden Globe nomination

Big-Hero-6

 Audrey Magazine:

Disney’s Big Hero 6 has been nominated for a Golden Globe in the category of Best Animated Feature Film.

Inspired by a Marvel comic book miniseries, Big Hero 6 follows a team of brainiacs led by 14-year-old prodigy Hiro Hamada and his huggable marshmallow-like robot, Baymax. Following a tragedy, Hiro enlists the help of his high-tech friends to hunt down a masked villain and to decipher a sinister plot that could destroy the city of San Fransokyo.

Two Korean American actors voiced supporting characters in the animated film: Daniel Henney as Hiro’s older brother, Tadashi Hamada, and Jamie Chung as the adrenaline junkie, GoGo Tomago.

Other nominees for the best animated film includes The Lego MovieHow to Train Your Dragon 2The Book of Life and The Boxtrolls.

The 72nd Golden Globe Awards will be hosted by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and will air live on NBC at 5 p.m (PST) on Sunday, Jan. 11. You can view all the nominees and categories here.

 

Korean American actress Jamie Chung on voicing superheroine GoGo Tomago in Disney’s “Big Hero 6″

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 1.59.19 PM

Audrey Magzine:

What’s even cooler than a female superhero? Two of them. Disney’s newest animated film Big Hero 6 details the adventures of boy-genius Hiro Hamada as he tries to investigate a fatal and suspicious fire that took everything away from him. With the assistance of his friends and a robot, Hiro forms a superhero team that can solve any mystery.

Korean American actress Jamie Chung voices one of Hiro’s two female, college-aged friends, GoGo Tomago.

What’s so great about her and Honey Lemon is that there’s no stereotype of, or cookie-cutter character of what they think a strong female character is,” Chung says about the brainy, female characters, each of whom are completely unique. While both GoGo and Honey Lemon are studying the sciences along with Wasabi and non-student Fred, they couldn’t be more different. Honey Lemon is “girly,” but can still use chemicals to create a destructive weapon; GoGo can get answers out of anyone with her cool yet direct personality.

Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios

She’s a woman of few words –– she’s like the Clint Eastwood character of the group,” says the actress, who has recently gained popularity for her role as Mulan in Once Upon a Time. “She’s got quite a lot of sass, she’s got a need for speed, she’s an adrenaline junkie, and she’s got a secret crush on Fred –– I’m just making that up, but I’m gonna go with it.”

After earning some major upgrades with costumes and gadgets, GoGo can out-race anything with her speed-inducing rollerblades and boomerang-like discs which she can throw at targets. Just as impressive, Honey Lemon can type a few elemental equations into her periodic table purse to produce chemical, explosive orbs.

I think what I love about this group and the reality is that intelligence is not sex-biased. Everyone is pretty equal in that world, and they can hang and if anything, they’re a bit more fearless than their male counterparts,” Chung says.

And when the mystery has been solved, the superheroes don’t go their separate ways to their ordinary lives; they hang out at Hiro’s aunt’s café and spend time with each other.

It really celebrates a new kind of family –– a very contemporary, unconventional family, and that’s with your friends.”

bigHero653c43aff866a4 (1)

 

‘Big Hero 6′ shows that an Asian American cast can top the box office

Big Hero 6 stars (L to R): Hiro Hamada, Baymax & GoGo Tomago. Source: disney.wikia.com

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American:

 

This past weekend’s box office numbers are in, and Disney’s latest project Big Hero 6 stands soundly on top. This might not come as a big surprise, considering that Frozen-fever is still holding every auntie’s TV hostage – but the film still breaks ground, especially in the scope of Asian Americans in cinema. And Hollywood should take note.

 

Daneil Henney (left) and Ryan Potter (right), co-stars of Big Hero 6. Source: sanfransokyo-bae.tumblr.com (yes, that's a real URL)

Daniel Henney (left) and Ryan Potter (right), co-stars of Big Hero 6

Big Hero 6 is a robotic sci-fi tale that revolves around Hiro Hamada,  Disney’s first explicitly mixed-heritage protagonist. Hamada is voiced by Ryan Potter, who is of Japanese and Caucasian descent himself. In fact, the entire film is placed in a “Hapa environment” of sorts, set in San Fransokyo, an architectural and cultural hybrid of the cities the name references.

Casting Asian Americans isn’t new to Disney, whose Mulan in 1998 was voiced by Ming-Na Wen, BD Wong and George Takei, among others.  Still, the studio has been inconsistent when it comes to this matter – the lead role in Lilo & Stitch wasn’t voiced by a Hawaiian (or an Asian Pacific American, for that matter), and we’d have to go as far back as Aladdin or even The Jungle Book to locate another Disney animation starring characters from a broader Asian origin (let’s pretend the Siamese Cats from Lady and the Tramp never happened).

Among those mentioned films, the only voice actor of Asian descent was Lea Salonga for Princess Jasmine’s singing parts. So while Big Hero 6 is a fictitious metropolis which never reveals what country it’s actually in, its cultural mash-up of settings, characters and themes means it could very well be Disney’s first Asian/American film that actually stars Asian American actors.

Hollywood’s reputation for placing white actors in Asian roles is a tale as old as time – from Goku in Dragonball: Evolution to Aang in The Last Airbender, glossing over the past century of Asian roles in American film would show little progress since Paul Muni and Luise Rainer donned yellowface in 1937’s The Good Earth. The track record for animation hasn’t been fantastic either, with white actors playing the lead roles in both Avatar series’ and the English dubs for Dragonball Z and Pokemon (I just ruined my childhood going through those links, BTW. You’re welcome).

 

superheroes

I

’m not the only one who has been griped by this cinematic phenomenon. When 2010’s The Last Airbender revealed an all-white cast (minus Dev Patel as the villain, of course), it caused such an uproar that an entire website called Racebending was launched against the production, and multiple petitions continue to call for a reboot of the franchise. Director M. Night Shyamalan, who’s Indian American himself, seemed aloof about the matter, insisting that the diversity of the cast and crew was on par with the United Nations. Those who have tried to actually find logic in prioritizing white actors in these roles have eluded to Asian and Asian American actors having less audience appeal than white actors, despite the fact that these films have failed among critics and fans alike.

Enter Big Hero 6, adapted from an obscure Marvel series about a Japanese counterpart to the Avengers. Unlike other Marvel titles like X-Men – which has an existing fanbase, or other Disney films like Maleficent – which is based on a childhood classic, Big Hero 6 relies on Disney’s promotion engine and, more importantly, its characters and storyline. Merely being a Disney film hasn’t always been a shoe-in (anyone watching The Rescuers: Down Under tonight?), but critics and audiences have been singing this one’s praises since it opened at the Tokyo International Film Festival late last month.

 

A night view of San Fransokyo, the make-believe home of the Big Hero 6. Source: disney.wikia.com

 

Debuting an awesome cartoon about Asians in the land known for cranking out awesome cartoons about Asians is a tough job for anyone, but Big Hero 6‘s ability to exhibit cultural tropes between America and Japan without being overly cheesy or offensive was impressive even to a cinema Grinch like me. Sure, I scoffed a bit at the pagoda-topped Golden Gate Bridge, but I also couldn’t help but feel validated to hear someone on the big screen say “red bean paste” as casually as one would say “hot dog.” The cast is diverse enough to make me suspect at least one member of the talent scout was a former member of the Third World Liberation Front – Potter, along with Daniel Henney, Jamie Chung, Damon Wayans, Jr. and Génesis Rodríguez make T.J. Miller and Scott Adsit’s roles the only two not filled by an actor of color.

 

"Big Hero 6" © 2014 Disney. All Rights Reserved.

 

I must say that I left the film with a bittersweet feeling, as I was disappointed when I didn’t see any Asian American names in the credits among the top-level crew – this is a testament to the fact that much progress is yet to be made. But where Big Hero 6 does succeed is that it actually tried what many of us knew would work all along – make characters that reflect the audience, and hire actors who reflect those characters. So if anyone else in Hollywood is still wondering if our audiences are ready to see more Asian Pacific Americans in the big screen, I’ll leave you with yet another box office dominator:

therock

 

Link

Concept art reveals what Jubilee might have looked like in ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’

 


Angry Asian Man:

 

Did you watch X-Men: Days of Future Past? She wasn’t in it for too long, but Fan BingBing as Blink was pretty darn cool. Next time, more Blink. More Asian X-Men in general. That said, some recently revealed concept art indicates what Jubilee, who didn’t make it into Days of Future Past, might have looked like in the movie.

Costume illustrator Philip Boutte Jr. recently posted some concept art for the latest X-Men movie, featuring a variety of alternate designs for Blink, Bishop, Iceman, Storm, Beast and other characters. Cool.

But hold up, his designs also include concepts for the X-Men’s Chinese American pyrotechnic mutant Jubilee (who bears a strong resemblance to actress Jamie Chung). It appears the fan-favorite mutant might have been in an early draft of the story, but didn’t make it into the final cut of Days of Future Past.

Take a look:

Here’s some concept art for Blink:

And here’s Warpath:


You can see more concept art from Philip Boutte here.

 

Check out this link:

Concept art reveals what Jubilee might have looked like in ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’

Link

Jamie Chung to Star in Indie ‘It’s Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong’

 

Bryan Greenburg Jamie Chung - H 2014

The romance film set in Hong Kong will be the directorial debut of Emily Ting, who also wrote the script.

 

Bryan Greenberg and Jamie Chung have been cast as the leads in indie It’s Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong.

The romance film, which recently won the Canon Filmmakers Award from Film Independent, will mark the feature directorial debut of Emily Ting, who also wrote the script.

Chung, who is engaged to Greenberg, will play a Chinese-American girl who, while visiting Hong Kong for the first time for business, meets American ex-pat Josh (Greenburg). An attraction forms between them but the timing might not be on their side.

Ting’s Unbound Feet Productions (The Kitchen) is producing along with Sophia Shek of Hong Kong-based IXII Productions. Principal photography is slated to begin in Hong Kong in May.

Greenberg, whose previous work includes HBO’s How to Make It in America and TV series One Tree Hill, most recently wrapped production on Vice alongside Bruce Willis and Thomas Jane. Repped by Gersh, Ellen Meyer Management and Jackoway Tyerman, Greenberg can next be seen in A Short History of Decay, which comes out in May.

Chung appeared in the films Grown Ups, Premium Rush and The Hangover Part II, and can next be seen in Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, coming out in August. She previously appeared on ABC’s Once Upon a Time, and just wrapped production on the first season of NBC’s Believe. She’s repped by Gersh, 3 Arts and Morris Yorn Barnes & Levine.

 

Check out this link:

Jamie Chung to Star in Indie ‘It’s Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong’

Link

“Once Upon a Time” actress Jamie Chung gets engaged

Bryan Greenberg, Jamie Chung

The year 2014 is going to be a very good one for Jamie Chung and Bryan Greenberg. The Once Upon a Time actress, 30, and the Flock of Dudes actor, 35, are recently engaged, sources tell E! News exclusively. Reps for the couple did not return immediate request for comment.

The future spouses began dating in the spring of 2012, and in mid-April, they took their romance public at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Annual Festival in Indio, Calif.

When Greenberg spoke to Elle three months later, he declined to talk specifics regarding their romance. “I don’t really talk too much about my personal life, but I’m happy,” he told the magazine.

Chung—who got her start as a cast member on MTV‘s The Real World: San Diego—was slightly more forthcoming when she spoke to Elle in September 2013. In fact, the Hangover star revealed that her beau had been a major source of support as she worked towards achieving a major personal goal.

He’s kind of suffering with me on my journey training for a half-marathon. So that’s been our thing. He’s been running with me. The couple who runs together, stays together!” the Sin City: A Dame to Kill For star joked of her live-in love, who previously starred in HBO’sHow to Make It in America, ABC’s October Road and The CW’s One Tree Hill. “We just stay pretty active.”

News of the couple’s engagement comes just after they celebrated the New Year in Turks and Caicos. Chung shared a series of pictures via Twitter and Instagram and added, “2013 [peace] out! Happy New Year everyone!!!!! See ya’ll in 2014!!!!!

Check out this link:

“Once Upon a Time” actress Jamie Chung gets engaged