Soy Shape saucers add a third dimension to your sushi experience

soy shapes

RocketNews 24 (by Michelle Hughes):

These dishes make playing with your food look classy and intelligent.

There’s always something cool and unusual to be found on Kickstarter, like ramen charts, samurai armor hoodies, or, in this case, ceramic saucers that play tricks with your eyes when filled with soy sauce.

▼ Soy Shape models “Cubes” and “Impossible Triangle”

soy shapes dishes

As for exactly how this optical illusion works,Tokyo-based creator and designer Duncan Shotton says that the slightly varying levels of the inner surface of the saucers take advantage of natural color gradations that occur in soy sauce at different depths. Thus, when the saucers are filled, the soy sauce takes on a 3-D quality.

The dishes are made from Hakuji porcelain in Gifu. Hakuji ceramics have a legacy stretching back to the 1600s, so the Soy Shape saucers are definitely going to be high-class.

soy shapes boxes

You already know the drill when it comes to Kickstarter: the more you pledge, the more awesome the perks become.  Although the campaign has already raised nearly four times the amount of its initial goal, you can still get in on the action and score a Soy Shape at prices starting at US$19.50.

There’s only a few days left in the Soy Shape campaign, so head on over to theKickstarter page ASAP if you’re looking to pick one up.

Representatives from 91 nations attend ceremony on 71st anniversary of atomic bombing of Hiroshima

peacememorialceremony

Japan Times:

Hiroshima on Saturday marked the 71st anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing, with Mayor Kazumi Matsui calling on world leaders to do more to abolish nuclear weapons and to follow U.S. President Barack Obama’s historic visit to the city in May with trips of their own.

At a memorial ceremony, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe echoed Matsui’s call and also urged young people to visit to observe the harrowing reality of the atomic bombing. Abe also reiterated Japan’s role in combating nuclear proliferation as the only country to have been attacked with nuclear weapons.

In the Peace Declaration read at the city’s annual memorial ceremony, Matsui urged the leaders of all nations to visit Hiroshima, which was devastated by an atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945, and Nagasaki, which was obliterated by another atomic strike three days later by the United States, in order to “etch the reality of the atomic bombings in each (leader’s) heart.

Matsui then called on the world to “unify and manifest our passion in action” to proceed toward a world free of nuclear weapons.

 

A moment of silence was observed at 8:15 a.m., the time the atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima at an altitude of about 600 meters, killing an estimated 140,000 people by the end of 1945. A second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on Aug. 9 that year, and Japan surrendered six days later, effectively ending the war.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe emphasized the importance of maintaining and enhancing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty that binds its signatories not to pursue atomic weapons programs.

Abe also said he will maintain his efforts to create a world free of nuclear weapons by asking both nuclear-weapon and non-nuclear-weapon states for cooperation, and by showing world leaders and young people the painful reality of radiation exposure.

During the ceremony, a message from U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was also read out by a representative.

Today, the world needs the hibakusha spirit more than ever,” at a time when “global tensions are rising” and progress on nuclear disarmament is “hard to find,” the message said, adding that nuclear powers “have special responsibility to prevent another Hiroshima,”

Ban urged all nations to “find common ground through inclusive dialogue.”

The ceremony was attended by representatives from 91 nations, including recognized nuclear weapons states such as Britain, France, the United States and Russia. The European Union was also represented.

The number of hibakusha stood at 174,080 as of March, and their average age was just over 80 years old.

Carry your laptop inside your clothes with the new “Packable Parka” from Japan

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RocketNews 24 (by Oona McGee):

Leave your bag at home and fill up the pockets of this denim hoodie with all your tech instead.

These days, cafes around the world are filled with people plugged into the online realm, typing on their laptops and scrolling through pages of information on their mobile phones. While the portability of notebooks and laptops makes it easier than ever to work online outside of the home, there’s been little advancement in the ways to carry our tech goods when heading out around town. In Japan, there’s a group that’s working towards an alternative to the humble bag, and they’ve come up with an innovative parka that has all the room and durability needed to let us say goodbye to PC bags forever!

▼ The “Packable Parka” is designed for laptop storage, with a main zippered section on the front that includes smaller pockets inside to keep all sorts of stationery and equipment firmly in place.

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While the clothing is ready to be worn and filled up to go, the parka can also be folded up into a bag for times when it’s not being worn, allowing users to revert to the traditional bag-style carrying method at any time. To see how the product transforms from bag to parka, check out the short video below:

The Packable Parka design is also being used for a number of other garments designed to hold lighter materials like stationery and notebooks. To see all the designs in the range, check out the group’s campaign page on Japanese crowdfunding site Makuake.

Their idea to combine storage with clothing is proving to be so popular, they’ve already surpassed their funding goal of 500,000 yen (US$4898) with 24 days remaining on their project!