NY Post: Ken Jeong “totally vindicated” by the success of his show Dr. Ken

 

NY Post (by Robert Rorke and Andrea Morabito):

After first exposing himself to audiences as “The Hangover’s” naked gangster Leslie Chow, Ken Jeong is taking on a much more grounded character in “Dr. Ken,” loosely based on his own past as a physician. With the comedy now picked up for a full season, Jeong fielded questions from The Post about turning his life into TV.

“Dr. Ken” got panned by critics — do you feel vindicated, now that ratings have been good?
In a word, yes. I feel totally vindicated because all the reviews were based on a pilot script that was in gestation for a long time, and I knew that the subsequent series episodes are much better in quality and will sustain the show. After the pilot, I knew we had room for improvement, and during the 10 weeks of pre-production, I was in the writers’ room every day, ensuring we would improve every aspect of the show from the writing to the characters to the quality of storylines, and we succeeded.

Dr. Ken air on Fridays at 8:30 p.m. on ABC

Margaret Cho slams SNL for inviting Donald Trump to host

margaret

OUT.com: 

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump is set to host Saturday Night Live next month, a move that has left many people outraged. Comedian Margaret Cho joined the foray, slamming producers for inviting a “known racist” to participate while failing for decades to promote true racial equality.

Taking aim, Cho said:

Why has there never been an Asian-American host, cast member or musical guest on ‘SNL’ in 41 years? Forty-one years. Yet they want Donald Trump, a known racist, a known sexist, who disgustingly wants to have sex with his daughter. Who does he think he is, Woody Allen?”

“People come at me and say, ‘Oh, Fred Armisen is a quarter Japanese, Rob Schneider is half Filipino.’ Yeah, that makes three-quarters of an Asian-American, not even in one person, in 41 years.

Cho went on to suggest herself as a musical guest and Ken Jeong and George Takei as potential hosts.

‘Dr. Ken’ is this fall’s first new comedy to score a full-season order from the networks

dr. ken

Hollywood Reporter:

Dr. Ken, a surprise hit on ABC‘s Friday block, is now the fourth broadcast freshman of the 2015-16 (and the second at ABC) to score a full season. The network has ordered a back nine episodes be produced, bringing the multicam sitcom’s order to a full 22.

Starring Community vet Ken Jeong, and loosely based on his own life, Dr. Ken is among the strongest first-year comedies of the fall. Often building on its lead-in from fellow broad comedy Last Man Standing, the series is averaging an impressive 6.6 million viewers and a 1.5 rating among adults 18-49. This past Friday, averaging a night-of 1.3 rating in the key demo and 5.8 million viewers, it also proved to be immune from comedy competition from NBC — which is airing its own comedy block in Friday’s 8 p.m. hour this fall to far less success.

Dr. Ken joins NBC’s Blindspot, Fox’s Rosewood and ABC’s Quantico as one of the few series to get a full season — and that comes as we enter the fifth week of fall TV.

Ken Jeong featured in bizarre ad for smartphone game “Cookie Jam”

Mashable (by Patrick Kulp):

Ken Jeong definitely knows how to make an entrance. In a breakout role in The Hangover, Jeong memorably leaps from a car trunk stark naked, madly flailing a crowbar. After that part, Jeong burst onto the comedy scene with a cast-member spot on NBC‘s Community and turns in several blockbuster movies.

Jeong was similarly unfazed with the absurdity of it all when the game makers first presented him with the script.

I knew exactly the tone they wanted to do — it was something that was really broad and physical but also with a deadpan delivery to it,” Jeong told Mashable. “It’s almost like a meta-commercial, where you’re satirizing old school commercials.

He was even able to put his own spin on the role, after spitballing a few different antics for his character.

We punted him a few different ideas of what we wanted to do,” said Josh Brooks, SVP of brand strategy & marketing for Cookie Jam maker SGN. “He was absolutely in character, coming up with unique ideas…Ken loves diving in and making things his own.”

The 30-second spot was good practice for Jeong’s current day-job, he says, where he is in the middle of shooting his first sitcom in a starring role, ABC’s Dr. Ken, and he has found himself with more creative control than ever before.

So it’s only fitting that the doctor-turned-actor makes his appearance in a new commercial for smartphone game Cookie Jam by barging Kool-Aid man-style through a wall into a hair salon clad in a cookie costume.

Y83a0343

Ken Jeong moves to center stage on ABC comedy ‘Dr. Ken’

Ken Jeong: I Was an 'Intense' Doctor Before I Became an Actor

LA Times (by Greg Braxton):

Comedian Ken Jeong used to be a doctor in real life. Now he’s playing one on TV. The outrageous Jeong, who has been a reliable comedic sprinkle in movies (“The Hangover” franchise) and TV shows (“Community“), is moving to center stage with his own sitcom, ABC’s “Dr. Ken.”

Although Jeong is the main focus, he stressed that the series is an ensemble show with its settings in the medical office and his home.

It’s ensemble driven, with my life as a doctor serving as a building block,” said Jeong at a Television Critics Assn. press tour presentation.

When one reporter at the session pointed out that ABC was the same network that programmed the ill-fated “American Girl” with Margaret Cho 20 years ago, Jeong said that he was very involved in his show, both as a writer and a producer, and that Cho likely was not allowed that level of creative participation.

The series features Jeong as a brilliant physician whose bedside manner can be best described as “edgy.” Although he is trying to get better, his staff is always after him to be nicer. He’s also a devoted husband and father who is overprotective of his two children.

He jokingly referred to himself as a “second-generation Asian American Fred MacMurray,” referring to the classic father figure in the 1960s sitcom “My Three Sons.”

Jeong was a physician in an HMO several years ago, doing stand-up comedy on the side. He said he was very intense and serious as a doctor and that his patients were relieved when they learned that he had a sideline as a comedian.

They said, ‘It’s so good you have a hobby,’ ” Jeong said. When Judd Apatow cast him as a doctor in “Knocked Up,” Jeong won raves for his comic timing and persona.

“‘Knocked Up’ changed my life,” he said. His wife encouraged him to pursue show business full time.

Jeong is one of the executive producers and a writer for “Dr. Ken.”

You will see more Asian guys on TV soon!

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 4.23.25 PM

Audrey Magazine:

Right now in Hollywood, it’s pilot casting season and (much to our delight) a lot of Asian American male actors are making headlines. Could this be the turn of the tide? Can we finally turn on the TV and regularly see Asian characters? We’ll have to wait and see. Although a number of shows have released information about their pilot, we will all have to wait until May for broadcast network channels to decide which shows to pick up and put on television. Needless to say, we have our fingers crossed for the shows which can bring forward Asian faces.

Apart from Daniel Wu’s Badlands, which has already been ordered directly to series by AMC, it is possible that none of the other pilots mentioned below will be picked up, but the rise in Asian American male actors being casted definitely gives us hope. Furthermore, they are being cast in roles that are substantial supporting roles or even leads. After all, it’s not just visibility that matters, but also the quality of representation.

Hopefully, we will hear about more pilot castings for talented Asian American actors in the upcoming months. For now, it’s heartening to see strides being made.

1. Daniel Wu

Image courtesy of LA TF

First up, there’s Hong Kong star Daniel Wu with his martial arts show Badlands, which cable network AMC has already ordered direct to series. Based very loosely on the Chinese tale Journey to the West, Wu stars as a “ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny” who goes on a journey with a young boy to find enlightenment. Wu will also serve as executive producer on Badlands. Only limited information about the series has been released, but we are definitely going to check it out once it airs on AMC.

 

Post navigation

You Will See More Asian Guys on TV Soon

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 4.23.25 PM

Right now in Hollywood, it’s pilot casting season and (much to our delight) a lot of Asian American male actors are making headlines. Could this be the turn of the tide? Can we finally turn on the TV and regularly see Asian characters? We’ll have to wait and see. Although a number of shows have released information about their pilot, we will all have to wait until May for broadcast network channels to decide which shows to pick up and put on television. Needless to say, we have our fingers crossed for the shows which can bring forward Asian faces.

Apart from Daniel Wu’s Badlands, which has already been ordered directly to series by AMC, it is possible that none of the other pilots mentioned below will be picked up, but the rise in Asian American male actors being casted definitely gives us hope. Furthermore, they are being cast in roles that are substantial supporting roles or even leads. After all, it’s not just visibility that matters, but also the quality of representation.

Hopefully, we will hear about more pilot castings for talented Asian American actors in the upcoming months. For now, it’s heartening to see strides being made.

 


 

1. Daniel Wu

Image courtesy of LA TF

First up, there’s Hong Kong star Daniel Wu with his martial arts show Badlands, which cable network AMC has already ordered direct to series. Based very loosely on the Chinese tale Journey to the West, Wu stars as a “ruthless, well-trained warrior named Sunny” who goes on a journey with a young boy to find enlightenment. Wu will also serve as executive producer on Badlands. Only limited information about the series has been released, but we are definitely going to check it out once it airs on AMC.

 

2. Ken Jeong

Image courtesy of Korea Times

Before Ken Jeong popped out of a trunk in The Hangover series, he was a practicing doctor by day at Kaiser Permanente and an aspiring comedian at night. Now ABC has greenlit his comedy pilot Dr. Ken, which Jeong is set to star, write and executive produce. According to Variety, Jeong will “play a frustrated HMO doctor juggling his career, marriage and parenting, but succeeding at none of them.” If this gets picked up, perhaps ABC could form a one hour Asian American comedy block with Dr. Ken and Fresh off the Boat?

 

3. Brian Tee

Image courtesy of Zimbio

Brian Tee has been in a lot of movies and TV shows such as The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, The Wolverine and the upcoming  Jurrasic World movie. Now, he has been cast for the NBC pilot Love is the Four Letter Word, created by a fellow Asian American writer Diana Son. According to Deadline, Love is the Four Letter Wordchronicles the collision of race, sexuality and gender roles when three diverse couples put modern marriage to the test. Tee plays Adam, half of one of the three couples, a big, handsome man who is currently dating Sarah, a fellow attorney who shares his taste for sexual adventure, including three-ways with beautiful women.”

Asian Americans in lead roles in front of and behind the camera? Plus an Asian American male character who shatters the emasculated, subservient Asian male stereotype? We are swooning already.

 

4. Daniel Henney

DanielHenney-1

Daniel Henney has been cast in a Criminal Minds spinoff. According to Deadline,the proposed spinoff follows FBI agents helping American citizens who find themselves in trouble abroad, with Gary Sinise playing their boss, Jack Garrett. Henney will play charming family man Matt Simmons, an army brat who grew up abroad and really embraces the opportunity to explore different cultures. But first and foremost, he is the kind of guy you would follow into battle, and his split second profiling skills honed on the battlefield make him a crucial part of the team.”

Henney joins an illustrious cast that includes Tyler James Williams and Emmy-award winner Anna Gunn.

 

5. Albert Tsai

Image courtesy of Albert Tsai's Official Twitter Account

For those of you who didn’t see ABC’s shortlived critical darling Trophy Wife, Albert Tsai played the breakout character Bert, who was considered by many to be the best part of a very good show. Although the show was cancelled after one season, Albert Tsai is moving on and has been cast as Ken Jeong’s son in the Dr. Ken pilot. Another Asian American family on an ABC sitcom? Just maybe. Is it too early to start the petition for the Fresh off the Boat/Dr. Ken crossover? Probably not.

 

Ken Jeong’s “30 for 30″ short for ESPN tells the story of Reggie Ho- Notre Dame’s legendary 5’5” walk-on kicker.


Angry Asian Man: 
This is the incredible story of the most unlikely person to ever play college football. A guy who, if you just looked at him, had no business playing the game for Notre Dame. But he became a football folk hero.

No, it’s not Rudy.

ESPN‘s latest “30 for 30documentary short Student/Athlete, directed by Ken Jeong, tells the story of Reggie Ho, a pre-med student from Hawaii who walked on to Notre Dame’s football team as a placekicker because he wanted to be “a more well-rounded person.

At 5-foot-5 and 135 pounds, he was one of the smallest players in college football, but ended up playing a crucial role in the Fighting Irish‘s undefeated 1988 season.

I have nothing against Rudy. He’s a fellow Notre Dame guy,” says former Notre Dame quarterback Tony Rice. “But Reggie Ho deserves better than that. Reggie’s a better story.”
I love it. Reggie kicks four field goals to singlefootedly defeat the University of Michigan. What does he do celebrate after the game? He heads to the library to hit the books. Reggie’s gotta study. True student athlete.

Is anyone working on the Hollywood movie version of the Reggie Ho story?