Sony stands up to North Korea and will show ‘The Interview’ on Christmas Day

As you’re likely aware, Sony‘s servers were recently hacked revealing private information of employees and celebrities alike. Amidst the cyber attack, an ulterior motive was revealed, one that threaten theaters and moviegoers who opted to see the film The Interview starring James Franco and Seth Rogen.

As a result Sony pulled the comedy from theaters. Since then rumors have swirled around that The Interview may go straight to DVD, stream via YouTube or go directly to the iTunes marketplace, however today, the production company has announced that it will premiere the movie in over 200, mostly independent, theaters around the States on Christmas Day.

President Obama is publicly behind the turn of events, after calling Sony’s decision to cancel the film’s release a “mistake.” Said a White House spokesperson, “As the president made clear, we are a country that believes in free speech, and the right of artistic expression.

Seth Rogen also tweeted, “The people have spoken! Freedom has prevailed! Sony didn’t give up!

While James Franco added, “Victory! The people and the President have spoken!

20 crazy facts about North Korea

nkflag

RocketNews 24:

There are many fascinating countries around the world–in fact, we’d wager that there aren’t any truly boring places. But one of the most bizarrely “can’t look away from the train wreck” places in the world is North Korea. Now, there’s a lot of information (and misinformation) out there about the country, and sometimes it can be hard to separate the fact from fiction. Still, we like to try, right?

So, you can imagine how excited we were when we found a series of twenty photos and facts about North Korea have been making the Internet rounds! But we wanted to know more! Click below to see the 20 facts and some of the background information we dug up.

north_korea_facts_01

This fact is absolutely, horrifyingly true, and you can read about what it was like being in the second generation in this gripping book Escape from Camp 14. We won’t say that it will reduce you to a sobbing mess of a human being–but if you can read it without going “Holy crap, I can’t even…” at least once, you might be an android. If you’re wondering what might get a North Korean sent to one of these prison labor camps, the answer is political crimes, such as criticizing the government or trying to escape.

north_korea_facts_02

This fact appeared in various places around the Internet, but we weren’t able to find an original source for it. However, we were able to learn a little bit about how jobs are assigned in North Korea. It seems that everyone is automatically given a job by the government after high school–and stuck with that job for life. However, the system is breaking down, and North Koreans now have to earn money on their own–by bribing their factory bosses, for example, to let them go to work in markets. There are other jobs in state-run “companies” that earn foreign currency–but they also require bribery to get into.

north_korea_facts_03

As surprising as this might be to many people around the world, this is true–and there’s actually a bit more going on. Cannabis isn’t the only drug that’s essentially legal in North Korea–the government also encourages people to grow opium on unused land to be resold abroad. As for marijuana plants growing freely by roadsides, the report we’ve linked to suggest that marijuana is often planted next to railroad tracks to help support the rails with their deep roots. Meth, on the other hand, is strictly prohibited–and users will “face a firing squad if caught.” Walter White, stay out of North Korea!

north_korea_facts_04

These facts were reported widely even by the western media after Kim Jong-Il’s death in 2011. While it’s impossible to verify how many holes-in-one the Dear Leader ever made, we’re guessing it’s safe to assume the real number is slightly lower than what the official records claim. But it wasn’t just Kim who took sports seriously–allegedly the North Korean soccer team was publicly derided for their loss at the 2010 FIFA World Cup forsix hours. Jeez, that’s almost as bad as having to play soccer.

north_korea_facts_05

Partly because of how it’s worded, this fact is a bit difficult to pin down. However, it’s worth remembering that in 2012, the reclusive country successfully launched a satellite into orbit. Fortunately, it seems that they lack any missiles capable of carrying a payload large enough to actually move any of their warheads. So, this is basically true–but they could probably land a really loud party-popper in North America if they had a few spares.

norkor-rocket

This is a kind of strange statistic to deal with, since it’s not clear what a success would be. We think this graphic is referring to satellite launches, though–and, yes, of the five launches made by North Korea, only one has made it to a successful orbit in space. However, the North Korean government claims that there is actually another satellite that made orbit in 1998 and is currently sending patriotic songs into space. For science! Or…something?

north_korea_facts_07

The number cited here seems to come for an Amnesty International report in the 1990s. One ex-guard who defected from North Korea guessed that about 2,000 people die of malnutrition each year in Hoeryong concentration camp–but that the number of inmates stays constant at 50,000 thanks to an equal number of incoming prisoners. The same guard estimated that 30% of prisoners have physical deformities such as missing limbs. You can read more about the camp conditions on Wikipedia, but we’re not sure we’d recommend it, especially if you’re eating.

north_korea_facts_08

This research was widely reported around the world when it was revealed in 2011, so you’ve probably heard about it before. What you might not have heard was the happiness ranking of the USA: Dead last. Hmm…we always suspected that Americans were all secretly depressed–just look at the TV shows! Only depressed people would watch a show called “Glee,” right?

north_korea_facts_09

This fact seems to have come from the 2009 book Nothing to Envy, which described the lives of six North Koreans over 15 years, including one school teacher. Apparently her accordion test was postponed due to the death of Kim Il-Sung, though she was still able to find work as a kindergarten teacher until she could take her test. As for the accordion prowess of North Koreans, well, you’ll just have to check this video out!

north_korea_facts_10

As much as people might complain about wasteful government spending, we can’t think of anything that holds a pork barrel to this, um, unique use of funds. In addition to the empty buildings, North Korea also had loudspeakers that would blare propaganda at its southern neighbor–who responded in kind. Fortunately for everyone in earshot, both countries agreed to cease their noisemaking in 2004, after which the loudspeakers were dismantled.

north_korea_facts_11

This was another fact that we weren’t able to verify. A number of websites report it, but it’s not clear what the actual source is. However, it’s important to note that there are frequent power outages in North Korea, so even if this were true, we imagine that a lack of electricity would render the radios silent. Bet you never thought someone would hope for their electricity to go out!

north_korea_facts_12

This fact seems to come from the Daily NK website, which includes a bit more information on statutes in North Korea. It turns out that all statues are produced in one place, the Mansudae Art Institute, and are actually guarded en route and “presented with a military saluted” as if real people. Sheesh, and we can’t even get our cats to treat us like fake people!

north_korea_facts_13

So, what about stuff that happened before Kim Il-sung was born? Apparently it’s standard practice to simply use the Gregorian calendar that western (and most other) nations use. We’re kind of disappointed. We were hoping for B.K. years–Burger King! Or, wait, would that be Before Kim…?

north_korea_facts_14

This fact is another one that we weren’t able to verify. It may be true, and would explain how North Korea claims a literacy rate of 99 percent–which would put it among the highest in the world. Obviously, almost no one seems to believe this statistic (remember the 1998  satellite?). On the other, the North Korean education system apparently includes 11 years of compulsory education, so it’s possible that the average North Korean really can read and write.

Unexploded ordinance left behind by Al Shabaab lay on the ground ahead of being destroyed by controlled detonation carried out by a combat engineering team serving with the Kenyan Contingent of the AMISOM in the southern Somali port city of Kismayo

Whoa! That is one hell of a way to go, isn’t it? And, yes, execution by mortar shell is a thing in North Korea, but it doesn’t seem to be particularly common. Apparently, it was used on a top ranking government official who didn’t wait long enough to have a party after the death of Kim Jong-il and was executed for lack of proper mourning. Kim Jong-un was reported as saying that the official, who was vice minister of the army when he still had all his cells in one piece, was to be completely obliterated, demanding that there be “no trace of him behind, down to his hair.”

north_korea_facts_16

This is certainly true, and you can even read the North Korean constitution if you feel like it. If you’re thinking this flies in the face of reality, you’re note entirely wrong, but the document also states some stuff that might not sound so familiar to foreigners. For example: “Citizens shall firmly safeguard the political and ideological unity and solidarity of the people,” and “Work is the noble duty and honour of a citizen.”

north_korea_facts_17

North Korea’s economy is obviously little more than a shadow of its former self. In 2011, the estimated GDP per person was about US$1,800 per year, which is just a little bit less than, say, South Korea where the GDP person is about $30,800 or the US where the number is about $51,000. On the other hand, we guess there’s not much worth buying in North Korea…

north_korea_facts_18

This fact hardly seems surprising, though we should note that while there is only one candidate for any position on the ballot, voters can, technically, veto a candidate. This means, that they can vote against someone by crossing their name out–but to do so, a voter would have to enter a special booth without any privacy. We’re not sure why, but we have this crazy idea that someone might be keeping track of anyone who feels like casting a veto vote.

A North Korean woman uses a computer in

We haven’t been able to find up-to-date numbers for this fact, but we suspect that it might be a bit out of date. The use of computers and the Internet seems to be growing in the country, though mostly limited to upper class professionals and students. For example, North Korea recently debuted its own operating system, called Red Star, based on Linux. Additionally, some are even saying that North Korea is going through a digital revolution–though on such a small scale that we think “hiccup” might be a better word than “revolution.” However, it’s even been claimed that North Koreans have a hand in developing software for everyone from Middle Eastern banks to…Nintendo and Sony? Uhhh…let’s just say we’re a bit…skeptical.

north_korea_facts_20

There’s really not much you can add to this, except to note that the wood is apparently being sold to a British company and is used in the “particleboard furniture you’ve got all over your house.”

Well, that’s it for today’s wild trip down North Korean Fact Lane, the weirdest lane in the land. We hope you had fun and learned a little something!

Celebs react furiously to Sony’s cancellation of ‘The Interview’ 

the int

 Audrey Magazine:

On December 17th, Sony Pictures announced that they would not only cancel all advance/private screenings of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg’s The Interview, they have completely pulled the plug and will no longer release the film in theaters on Christmas day. In fact, the studio has no further release plans for the film at all.

As you may already know, all of this is in response to cyber attacks on Sony Pictures which resulted in a leak of countless private emails. The hackers, known only as “Guardians of the Peace,” then threatened to perform an “11th of September”-style attack on all movie theaters showing the film which portrays the assassination of North Korean dictator, Kim Jong-Un.

As a result, the nation’s five biggest theater chains (Regal Entertainment, AMC Entertainment, Cinemark, Cineplex Entertainment and Carmike Cinemas) all decided to cancel showings of The Interview. Sony Pictures then cancelled the film entirely. Despite our efforts to support talented Asian American actors, even our very own screening of The Interview was cancelled.

Sony released a statement on Wednesday:

In light of the decision by the majority of our exhibitors not to show the film The Interview, we have decided not to move forward with the planned December 25 theatrical release. We respect and understand our partners’ decision and, of course, completely share their paramount interest in the safety of employees and theater-goers.

Sony Pictures has been the victim of an unprecedented criminal assault against our employees, our customers, and our business. Those who attacked us stole our intellectual property, private emails, and sensitive and proprietary material, and sought to destroy our spirit and our morale – all apparently to thwart the release of a movie they did not like. We are deeply saddened at this brazen effort to suppress the distribution of a movie, and in the process do damage to our company, our employees, and the American public. We stand by our filmmakers and their right to free expression and are extremely disappointed by this outcome.

 

Some support this decision and claim that safety must come first. Others shake their heads in disappointment over Sony’s decision and point out that this cowardice gives hackers even more power to control. Many Hollywood celebs have put in their two cents and it is clear that this news does not sit well with them.

Secret photos from inside North Korea show life in the world’s most isolated country

North Korea: Anonymous Country by Julia Leeb is available now from teNeues

Fast Company:

For travelers visiting North Korea, taking the wrong photo can be a punishable offense. Guides stay close to tourists, letting them know when it’s okay to snap the shutter, and North Korean citizens are supposed to report any photography they see. Professional photojournalists are rarely allowed to enter the country.

Despite the danger, two years ago, German photographer Julia Leeb flew to North Korea. She hid the fact that she was a journalist, and ended up with a stunning collection of photos. Her new book, North Korea: Anonymous Country, will come out this week.

 

©Julia Leeb

 

Leeb was drawn to North Korea out of deep curiosity. “What do we know about this profoundly isolated country?” she says. “International headlines report about military parades and the ‘great marshal,’ but what about the 24 million inhabitants?

She spent a week traveling the entire country, documenting celebrations for the 100th birthday of Kim Jong Un‘s grandfather Kim Il Sung, giant synchronized dances, nearly empty streets, and oddities like a children’s museum featuring a nuclear missile.

While she traveled, accompanied by two friends and the rest of a tour group, she was completely disconnected from the rest of the world. “We had no television, no phone line, no Internet, and there were almost no other foreigners,” she says. “Most of the time we were the only guests in a hotel, sometimes the only foreigners in an entire city.”

Just before the trip began, North Korea announced they were dissolving their armistice with South Korea, and the U.S. started gearing up for a potential war. But Leeb had no idea what was happening. She also didn’t know what might happen when the group’s passports were taken away after she took photos out of a bus—and she couldn’t talk about the situation with anybody else.

 

©Julia Leeb

We were monitored constantly, we were quite sure that our rooms were bugged, so we did not communicate our concerns within the group,” she says. “After they confiscated our passports everybody had to deal alone with these ‘what-if’ moments.

In the end, nothing went wrong. After an evening of bowling and North Korean beer and some cross-cultural bonding, the guides returned the passports, and eventually Leeb flew home to look through the hundreds of photos she’d taken and think about everything she’d seen.

Traveling the ‘hermit kingdom’ is a constant surprise,” she says. “This communist dynasty is untouched by the outside world. The surreal cult of personality, North Koreas own calendar combined with the anachronistic architecture makes you feel like being in a parallel universe.”

 

3033612-slide-s-7-incredible-photos-of-the-most-isolated-country-in-the-world 3033612-slide-s-3-incredible-photos-of-the-most-isolated-country-in-the-world 3033612-slide-s-1-incredible-photos-of-the-most-isolated-country-in-the-world 3033612-slide-s-5-incredible-photos-of-the-most-isolated-country-in-the-world 3033612-slide-s-2-incredible-photos-of-the-most-isolated-country-in-the-world

Watch Seth Rogen and James Franco make a Korean BBQ Lasagna 

KBBQ-Lasagna-e1417638268617

 

Audrey Magazine:

Korean food is a wonderful thing. From the meats to the veggies to the seafood and every grain of rice, there is such a wide range of tastes and pleasures within every dish.

Leave it to the loud, bearded guys at Epic Meal Time to smash it all together in their own charming way. Add in Seth Rogen and James Franco, and you have the best or worst cooking segment ever filmed, depending on your mood and sobriety. In that context, the enormous Korean BBQ lasagna they threw together is either the nastiest or most delicious thing you’ve ever seen.

The actors were on hand to promote their upcoming movie, The Interview, in which their characters are tasked by the CIA to assassinate Kim Jong-un when they travel to North Korea. According to Rogen and Franco, nothing screams authentically Korean more than fries and pasta. And Koreans apparently eat everything with kimchi, gochujang and ssamjang, which might not be too far from the truth.

Pack in bulgogi (which Franco says is named for the lead prosecutor in the Manson trial, Vincent Bugliosi), kimchi pork belly and kimchi pancakes in between the kimchi pasta layers, and you have an enormous spicy lasagna with a touch of cultural ignorance. Of course, it’s James Franco and Seth Rogen, so what can you do.

Check out the video below:

South Korea bombards the North… with Choco Pies

South Koreans sent their Northern neighbors a chocolate surprise on Wednesday in the form of 10,000 flying Choco Pies. The snacks were launched across the border in 50 giant (condom resembling) balloons.

In case you were wondering, Choco Pies are a delicious combination of chocolate, marshmallow and cake. The South Korean produced pies are widely popular in North Korea and often handed out as bonuses to factory workers. The snack is so well-loved that Choco Pies soon flooded the North Korean black market at inflated prices, becoming something of their own currency.

Angry at the popularity of the South Korean product, North Korea’s supreme leader Kim Jong-un banned the treats as a symbol of the evils of capitalism. South Koreans responded by flying the now politically symbolic pies across the border in their thousands.

We will continue to send Choco Pie by balloons because it is still one of the most popular foodstuffs especially among hungry North Koreans,” Choo Sun-Hee, one of the balloon launch’s organizers told AFP.

South Korean activists and North Korean dissidents regularly launch balloons between the countries, usually containing anti-Pyongyang leaflets and DVDs.

North Korea, angry and belligerent as ever, has vowed to shell the people responsible for their chocolate presents.

 

20 crazy facts about North Korea

nkflag

There are many fascinating countries around the world–in fact, we’d wager that there aren’t any truly boring places. But one of the most bizarrely “can’t look away from the train wreck” places in the world is North Korea. Now, there’s a lot of information (and misinformation) out there about the country, and sometimes it can be hard to separate the fact from fiction. Still, we like to try, right?

So, you can imagine how excited we were when we found a series of twenty photos and facts about North Korea have been making the Internet rounds! But we wanted to knowmore! Click below to see the 20 facts and some of the background information we dug up.

 

north_korea_facts_01

This fact is absolutely, horrifyingly true, and you can read about what it was like being in the second generation in this gripping book Escape from Camp 14. We won’t say that it will reduce you to a sobbing mess of a human being–but if you can read it without going “Holy crap, I can’t even…” at least once, you might be an android. If you’re wondering what might get a North Korean sent to one of these prison labor camps, the answer is political crimes, such as criticizing the government or trying to escape.

 

north_korea_facts_02

This fact appeared in various places around the Internet, but we weren’t able to find an original source for it. However, we were able to learn a little bit about how jobs are assigned in North Korea. It seems that everyone is automatically given a job by the government after high school–and stuck with that job for life. However, the system is breaking down, and North Koreans now have to earn money on their own–by bribing their factory bosses, for example, to let them go to work in markets. There are other jobs in state-run “companies” that earn foreign currency–but they also require bribery to get into.

 

north_korea_facts_03

As surprising as this might be to many people around the world, this is true–and there’s actually a bit more going on. Cannabis isn’t the only drug that’s essentially legal in North Korea–the government also encourages people to grow opium on unused land to be resold abroad. As for marijuana plants growing freely by roadsides, the report we’ve linked to suggest that marijuana is often planted next to railroad tracks to help support the rails with their deep roots. Meth, on the other hand, is strictly prohibited–and users will “face a firing squad if caught.” Walter White, stay out of North Korea!

 

north_korea_facts_04

These facts were reported widely even by the western media after Kim Jong-Il’s death in 2011. While it’s impossible to verify how many holes-in-one the Dear Leader ever made, we’re guessing it’s safe to assume the real number is slightly lower than what the official records claim. But it wasn’t just Kim who took sports seriously–allegedly the North Korean soccer team was publicly derided for their loss at the 2010 FIFA World Cup for six hours. Jeez, that’s almost as bad as having to play soccer.

 

north_korea_facts_05

Partly because of how it’s worded, this fact is a bit difficult to pin down. However, it’s worth remembering that in 2012, the reclusive country successfully launched a satellite into orbit. Fortunately, it seems that they lack any missiles capable of carrying a payload large enough to actually move any of their warheads. So, this is basically true–but they could probably land a really loud party-popper in North America if they had a few spares.

 

norkor-rocket

This is a kind of strange statistic to deal with, since it’s not clear what a success would be. We think this graphic is referring to satellite launches, though–and, yes, of the five launches made by North Korea, only one has made it to a successful orbit in space. However, the North Korean government claims that there is actually another satellite that made orbit in 1998 and is currently sending patriotic songs into space. For science! Or…something?

 

north_korea_facts_07

The number cited here seems to come for an Amnesty International report in the 1990s. One ex-guard who defected from North Korea guessed that about 2,000 people die of malnutrition each year in Hoeryong concentration camp–but that the number of inmates stays constant at 50,000 thanks to an equal number of incoming prisoners. The same guard estimated that 30% of prisoners have physical deformities such as missing limbs. You can read more about the camp conditions on Wikipedia, but we’re not sure we’d recommend it, especially if you’re eating.

 

north_korea_facts_08

This research was widely reported around the world when it was revealed in 2011, so you’ve probably heard about it before. What you might not have heard was the happiness ranking of the USA: Dead last. Hmm…we always suspected that Americans were all secretly depressed–just look at the TV shows! Only depressed people would watch a show called “Glee,” right?

 

north_korea_facts_09

This fact seems to have come from the 2009 book Nothing to Envy, which described the lives of six North Koreans over 15 years, including one school teacher. Apparently her accordion test was postponed due to the death of Kim Il-Sung, though she was still able to find work as a kindergarten teacher until she could take her test. 

 

north_korea_facts_10

As much as people might complain about wasteful government spending, we can’t think of anything that holds a pork barrel to this, um, unique use of funds. In addition to the empty buildings, North Korea also had loudspeakers that would blare propaganda at its southern neighbor–who responded in kind. Fortunately for everyone in earshot, both countries agreed to cease their noisemaking in 2004, after which the loudspeakers were dismantled.

 

north_korea_facts_11

This was another fact that we weren’t able to verify. A number of websites report it, but it’s not clear what the actual source is. However, it’s important to note that there are frequent power outages in North Korea, so even if this were true, we imagine that a lack of electricity would render the radios silent. Bet you never thought someone would hope for their electricity to go out!

 

north_korea_facts_12

This fact seems to come from the Daily NK website, which includes a bit more information on statutes in North Korea. It turns out that all statues are produced in one place, the Mansudae Art Institute, and are actually guarded en route and “presented with a military saluted” as if real people. Sheesh, and we can’t even get our cats to treat us like fake people!

 

north_korea_facts_13

So, what about stuff that happened before Kim Il-sung was born? Apparently it’s standard practice to simply use the Gregorian calendar that western (and most other) nations use. We’re kind of disappointed. We were hoping for B.K. years–Burger King! Or, wait, would that be Before Kim…?

 

north_korea_facts_14

This fact is another one that we weren’t able to verify. It may be true, and would explain how North Korea claims a literacy rate of 99 percent–which would put it among the highest in the world. Obviously, almost no one seems to believe this statistic (remember the 1998  satellite?). On the other, the North Korean education system apparently includes 11 years of compulsory education, so it’s possible that the average North Korean really can read and write.

 

Unexploded ordinance left behind by Al Shabaab lay on the ground ahead of being destroyed by controlled detonation carried out by a combat engineering team serving with the Kenyan Contingent of the AMISOM in the southern Somali port city of Kismayo

Whoa! That is one hell of a way to go, isn’t it? And, yes, execution by mortar shell is a thing in North Korea, but it doesn’t seem to be particularly common. Apparently, it was used on a top ranking government official who didn’t wait long enough to have a party after the death of Kim Jong-il and was executed for lack of proper mourning. Kim Jong-un was reported as saying that the official, who was vice minister of the army when he still had all his cells in one piece, was to be completely obliterated, demanding that there be “no trace of him behind, down to his hair.”

 

north_korea_facts_16

This is certainly true, and you can even read the North Korean constitution if you feel like it. If you’re thinking this flies in the face of reality, you’re note entirely wrong, but the document also states some stuff that might not sound so familiar to foreigners. For example: “Citizens shall firmly safeguard the political and ideological unity and solidarity of the people,” and “Work is the noble duty and honour of a citizen.

 

north_korea_facts_17

North Korea’s economy is obviously little more than a shadow of its former self. In 2011, the estimated GDP per person was about US$1,800 per year, which is just a little bit less than, say, South Korea where the GDP person is about $30,800 or the US where the number is about $51,000. On the other hand, we guess there’s not much worth buying in North Korea…

 

north_korea_facts_18

This fact hardly seems surprising, though we should note that while there is only one candidate for any position on the ballot, voters can, technically, veto a candidate. This means, that they can vote against someone by crossing their name out–but to do so, a voter would have to enter a special booth without any privacy. We’re not sure why, but we have this crazy idea that someone might be keeping track of anyone who feels like casting a veto vote.

 

A North Korean woman uses a computer in

We haven’t been able to find up-to-date numbers for this fact, but we suspect that it might be a bit out of date. The use of computers and the Internet seems to be growing in the country, though mostly limited to upper class professionals and students. For example, North Korea recently debuted its own operating system, called Red Star, based on Linux. Additionally, some are even saying that North Korea is going through a digital revolution–though on such a small scale that we think “hiccup” might be a better word than “revolution.” However, it’s even been claimed that North Koreans have a hand in developing software for everyone from Middle Eastern banks to…Nintendo and Sony? Uhhh…let’s just say we’re a bit…skeptical.

 

north_korea_facts_20

There’s really not much you can add to this, except to note that the wood is apparently being sold to a British company and is used in the “particleboard furniture you’ve got all over your house.”

Video

“Glorious Leader!” Kim Jong Un video game

Throwing concern for recent events and potential controversy to the wind, Money Horse Games prepares to release its Glorious Leader! video game loosely based on the life of Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea.

The game promises retro graphics, over-the-top bosses and other blatant references to the dictator’s lifestyle including his ‘friendship’ with Dennis Rodman. The side-scrolling shooter has Kim taking on the entire U.S. Army through seven different levels sometimes with or without the help of a unicorn. The game is slated to release to PC and mobile devices soon.

Link

North Korea: 20 Things you didn’t know…

Memolition:

You might not know much about North Korea except that it’s an isolationist mystery.

It’s time to learn some strange but interesting facts…

Check out this link:

North Korea: 20 Things you didn’t know…

north_korea_facts_01 north_korea_facts_02 north_korea_facts_03 north_korea_facts_08 north_korea_facts_09 north_korea_facts_10 north_korea_facts_04 north_korea_facts_11 north_korea_facts_05 Unexploded ordinance left behind by Al Shabaab lay on the ground ahead of being destroyed by controlled detonation carried out by a combat engineering team serving with the Kenyan Contingent of the AMISOM in the southern Somali port city of Kismayo north_korea_facts_12 norkor-rocket north_korea_facts_16 north_korea_facts_13 north_korea_facts_17 north_korea_facts_07 north_korea_facts_18 north_korea_facts_14 A North Korean woman uses a computer in north_korea_facts_20

Link

Kim Jong-un allegedly orders entire extended family of executed uncle killed

 

RocketNews 24:

kimjong1

Remember the good old days, when North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il was just the right combination of diminutive, bumbling and evil to make the country at once problematic yet adorable? Well, Jong-il’s son and recently-ascended heir to the North Korean throne, Kim Jong-un, seems hellbent on making sure North Koreans are the go-to Hollywood antagonists for the next 20 years’ worth of action movies, with unpredictable and combative behavior towards the international community and human rights violations far more brazen and horrific than even his notoriously unpredictable father dared.

Case in point: Several unnamed sources have come forward to alert the international press that the young North Korean leader has gone ahead with the “purging” of his uncle Jang Song Thaek’s entire extended family, just weeks after the young Kim had Jang Song Thaek himself executed under the possibly bogus accusations that he harbored “traitorous” intentions.

In a move seemingly lifted from the pages of George R.R. Martin’s murder-centric Game of Thrones series, Kim Jong-un apparently had Jang Song Thaek’s sister and her husband, a nephew, sons, daughters and grandchildren dragged from their homes and killed; although sources say that those who married into the family were spared execution and instead ordered into exile.

Purging entire families of condemned traitors was a not-so-uncommon practice way back when people thought animal bones told the future, but obviously the practice is highly frowned upon by the modern international community.

It’s important to note, however, that because of North Korea’s extremely secretive nature, all kinds of fanciful stories make the media rounds from time to time only to be proven untrue. We’re hoping that this is just another case of rumor and speculation gone wild, but if it pans out, we’re anxious to hear what basketball star-cum-Kim Jong-un’s best buddy Dennis Rodman has to say on the matter…

Source: Itai News

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Kim Jong-un allegedly orders entire extended family of executed uncle killed