Breaking the Asian myth: No, not ALL Asians are short

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Audrey Magazine:

As title of this series suggests, our Breaking the Asian Myth stories seek to challenge absurd stereotypes about the Asian community. So far we’ve looked into the ridiculous assumption that all Asian women have the same kind of hair, the impossible belief that Asians can’t get fat, and even the dangerous theory that Asian women need not worry about breast cancer. Yeah, my eyes hurt from all the eyerolling too.

In reality, the umbrella term “Asian” is composed of many, many ethnicities so no one should assume we all have the exact same features. However, it seems no matter how many times we have to clarify that these assumptions don’t apply to all of us (No mister, I can’t explain to you what your Chinese tattoo means… seeing as I’m not even Chinese), we still have a load of overgeneralizations thrown at us on a daily basis.

One such overgeneralization that I’ve heard all my life is the idea that all Asians are short. Being a proud member of the fun-sized community myself, I admit that there are quite a number of us. But is that enough to justify the pure shock and disbelief Asians get when they actually are tall? I don’t know about that.

So here’s some love for all of you who are tired of people constantly pointing out that you’re tall for an Asian, and feel left out when you tower over the rest of us. You’re not alone! Check out some of our favorite Asian celebs who certainly break this Asian Myth.

Yao Ming — 7’6”

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Dave Bautista — 6’6″

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Dwayne Johnson — 6’5″

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Jeremy Lin — 6’4″

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Daniel Henney — 6’2″

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Sung Kang — 6’1″

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Kimora Lee Simmons — 6’0”

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Liu Wen — 5’11”

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Tao Okamoto — 5’10”

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Sui He — 5’10”

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Sun Fei Fei — 5’10”

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Grace Park 5’9”

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Deepika Padukone 5’9”

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Link

20 Asian celebs you didn’t know were Asian

 

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Audrey Magazine:

Not all Asians look the same. I repeat, not all Asians look the same.

It seems no matter how many times we say it, people simply assume that all Asians share the same physical features. Some believe we all have the same body structure and others even think we all have the same kind of hair.

Of course, we know this is absurd. We know that there are plenty of ethnicities which categorize under the umbrella term “Asian” and we know there are plenty of Asians who are of mixed race. So why do people think all Asians look the alike?

Well it may have a thing or two to do with media’s portrayal of Asians. If audiences have only been exposed to a very particular type of Asian, how can they know we’re all different? This lack of exposure may be the very reason many celebs who are bi-racial or multiracial often become overlooked in the Asian community.

Even if they don’t necessarily “look it,” all of the following celebrities are Asian.

Check out this link: 

20 Asian celebs you didn’t know were Asian

Check out our list of 20 Asian celebs you probably didn’t know were Asian:

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1) Vanessa Hudgens (Part Filipino, Part Chinese)

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2) Tiger Woods (Part Thai, Part Chinese)

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3) Chad Michael Murray (Quarter Japanese)

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4) Dean Cain (Quarter Japanese)

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5) Nicole Scherzinger (Half Filipino)

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6) Keanu Reeves (Quarter Hawaiian, Quarter Chinese)

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7) Darren Criss (Half Filipino)

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8) Ne-Yo (Quarter Chinese)

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9) Apl.de.ap (Filipino*)

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10) Jennifer Tilly (Half Chinese)

 

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11) Enrique Iglesias (Half Filipino)

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12) Amerie Rogers (Half Korean)

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13) Mark-Paul Gosselaar (Quarter Indonesian)

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14) Kristin Kreuk (Half Chinese)

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15) Kimora Lee Simmons (Half Korean*)

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16) Norah Jones (Half Indian)

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17) Rob Schneider (Quarter Filipino)

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18) Chanel Iman (Half Korean)

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19) Lindsay Price (Half Korean)

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20) Michelle Branch (Quarter Indonesian)

Link

New book explores representations of mixed race Asian Americans in popular culture

 

In this first book-length study of media images of multiracial Asian Americans, Leilani Nishime traces the codes that alternatively enable and prevent audiences from recognizing the multiracial status of Asian Americans.

Nishime’s perceptive readings of popular media–movies, television shows, magazine articles, and artwork–indicate how and why the viewing public often fails to identify multiracial Asian Americans. Using actor Keanu Reeves, golfer Tiger Woods, and the television show Battlestar Galactica as examples, Nishime suggests that this failure is tied to gender, sexuality, and post-racial politics. In contrast to these representations, Nishime provides a set of alternative moments when audiences can view multiracial Asians as multiracial. Through a consideration of the Matrix trilogy, reality TV star Kimora Lee Simmons, and the artwork of Kip Fulbeck, these examples highlight both the perils and benefits of racial visibility, uncovering our society’s ways of constructing racial categories. Throughout this incisive study, Nishime offers nuanced interpretations that open the door to a new and productive understanding of race in America.

Nishime’s persuasive, well-grounded analysis yields genuinely brilliant insights regarding the pitfalls and possibilities of multiracial visibility in contemporary media culture. Lucidly written with appealing attention to popular texts, this is the sort of book that moves multiracial and Asian American studies in interesting and engaging new directions.”–Glen Mimura, author of Ghostlife of Third Cinema: Asian American Film and Video

Leilani Nishime is an assistant professor of communications at the University of Washington and the coeditor of East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture.

Check out this link:

New book explores representations of mixed race Asian Americans in popular culture