Japanese artist HYdeJII transformed a Roomba into an art-making machine

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The iRobot Roomba has been given a new lease on life thanks to HYdeJII. The Japanese artist has transformed the humble house-cleaning robot into an art-making machine dubbed Mr.Head. Retrofitted with paint bottles and tubes, the design can zoom around a canvas to create its own unique pieces of contemporary art.

15 years old. Started creating works as a robot artist after being recreated a house cleaning robot manufactured by iRobot. Began painting in October 2014. His robot features allow him to paint with a unique and mechanical, geometric touch. “What is a robot’s identity, what is its sense of beauty?” He searches for an answer to these questions through his artwork. His most well-known works include Spring Worm Hole and Spring Starburst.

You can check out the paint-spraying Roomba in action below with behind-the-scenes looks at the creation of two of its most noteworthy creations.

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Art/Design: Echo Yang’s “Autonomous Machines”- Walkman

Graphic designer Echo Yang explores the current popularity of generative design processes, where computer software iterates endless variations, by turning old school analog devices like tin windup toys, a Walkman, an alarm clock and other machines into instruments of self-generated output.

With her project Echo Yang reveals the internal algorithms of obsolete machines. Though instead of creating these algorithms, she simply adopts and then visualizes them by for example attaching a swab with paint to a bobbing tin chicken wind-up toy and recording the dabs.

 

Video

Art/Design: Echo Yang’s “Autonomous Machines”- TinToy (Chicken)

Graphic designer Echo Yang explores the current popularity of generative design processes, where computer software iterates endless variations, by turning old school analog devices like tin windup toys, a Walkman, an alarm clock and other machines into instruments of self-generated output.

With her project Echo Yang reveals the internal algorithms of obsolete machines. Though instead of creating these algorithms, she simply adopts and then visualizes them by for example attaching a swab with paint to a bobbing tin chicken wind-up toy and recording the dabs.