How to Do Action Comedy, featuring Jackie Chan

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1PCtIaM_GQ

Jackie Chan‘s comedic style needs no introduction, seamlessly blending action and comedy in his light-hearted kung fu films that have time and again enraptured audiences over the course of his decades-long career. However, as shown by Tony Zhou of YouTube channel Every Frame A Painting, that seamlessness is the result of no small amount of blood, sweat and an obsessive pursuit of perfection by Jackie Chan himself.

In this in-depth analysis of everything from the plot, framing, musicality and unadulterated ingenuity of his fight scenes, you will leave with a newfound appreciation of Jackie Chan’s mastery of his craft, as well as the areas in which American action films and editing techniques are still sorely lacking.

Enjoy the video above and check out the rest of Every Frame A Painting over here.

Link

BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) presents “All Hail the King: The Films of King Hu”

 

Jun 6—Jun 17, 2014
Part of BAMcinématek

Master of the martial arts movie, Chinese cinematic titan King Hu revolutionized the wuxia/swordplay film, introducing a refined sense of aesthetics, attention to mise-en-scène, and sense of mysticism to the genre that was borne out of his lifelong love for Chinese opera. With its unique blend of thrilling action and dazzling stylistic expressiveness, Hu’s style influenced decades of subsequent Asian cinema.

BAMcinématek‘s full-career retrospective of this “extravagantly talented visual stylist” (Bruce Bennett, The New York Sun) presents his work alongside an international selection of films that either anticipate his inimitable style or bear its influence.

Presented in conjunction with the Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York.

All the King’s Men
Wed, Jun 11, 2014

Hu introduced a wry sense of humor into the historical epic form with this lavish, gorgeous-to-behold tale of intrigue, power plays, and elaborate political machinations during the tail end of the Tang Dynasty.

 

The Blade
Fri, Jun 13, 2014

A longtime favorite of Quentin Tarantino, this brutal martial arts film is one of Tsui Hark’s most audacious works.

The Valiant Ones
Fri, Jun 13, 2014

Hu’s last wuxia film is a stylistically innovative tale about a band of warriors battling Japanese pirates that transforms breathless fight sequences into an abstracted rush of rhythm and movement.

Goodbye, Dragon Inn
Sat, Jun 14, 2014

Contemporary art-house darling Tsai Ming-liang pays poignant tribute to Hu with this entrancing elegy for the golden age of Taiwanese cinema set during the last screening at a crumbling Taipei movie palace.

Dragon Inn
Sat, Jun 14, 2014

A trio of swordsmen and women battle the forces of a powerful, conniving eunuch in this awe-inspiringly ambitious martial arts classic that laid the foundations for decades of wuxia films to come.

Seven Samurai
Sun, Jun 15, 2014

This sweeping chronicle of courage and heroism is one of the greatest movie epics of all time.

 

The Fate of Lee Khan
Sun, Jun 15, 2014

Martial arts icon Angela “Lady Whirlwind” Mao stars in this rollicking, rousing comic adventure about a band of largely female warriors who join forces to stop a Mongol warlord from acquiring a valuable map.

 

 Legend of the Mountain

Mon, Jun 16, 2014

One of Hu’s most visually ravishing works, this supernatural fable follows a scholar on retreat in the mountains who finds himself seduced by ghosts.

 

Raining in the Mountain
Tue, Jun 17, 2014

Intrigue abounds in a Buddhist monastery as a nobleman and a general each conspire to steal a valuable scroll in this virtuoso showcase for Hu’s luxurious mise-en-scène.

 

Check out this link:

BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music) presents “All Hail the King: The Films of King Hu”

Link

Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Fest presents “Awesome Asian Bad Guys” (May 3rd and 9th)

 

 

In Los Angeles this weekend or next? Head over to the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Fest as they present screenings of “Awesome Asian Bad Guys” on May 3rd and 9th. 

 

Synopsis:

The “fourth wall” comes crashing down, in a BIG way, in AWESOME ASIAN BAD GUYS, the brainchild of internet sensations Patrick Epino (VOID, Festival 2005) and Stephen Dypiangco. Having met nearly four years ago during Festival Week 2010, Epino — an alumnus of San Francisco State University’s Cinematic Arts program and Visual Communications’ own Armed With a Camera Fellowship — and NYU Film School graduate Dypiangco established the online destination, The National Film Society, as a means of promoting face-to-face dialogue with Asian Pacific American independent and mainstream entertainment professionals on all things pertinent to APA cinema.

As the film starts, our loveable, awkward duo wrap up yet another installment of NFS for upload. Only problem is, the episode is ruined when a trespasser somehow walks through the living room door and photo-bombs the shoot. The interloper turns out to be none other than veteran actress Tamlyn Tomita, who avails upon the guys to assemble a team of veteran Asian American bad-guy actors for the purpose of avenging a dastardly wrong, executed by one Aaron Takahashi (Aaron Takahashi), the leader of the ruthless Wang Chung crime syndicate. Unfortunately, the motley crew of “legendary” Asian American heavies they put together — Al Leong, Yuji Okumoto, George Cheung and Randall Park (whose sole purpose seems to be the “useless” and not-quite-awesome Asian Bad Guy) — can’t stand each other.

Filled with a rapid-fire string of in-jokes and stereotypes turned on its collective heads, this rollicking send-up of just about every kind of genre and schlock-cinema beloved by our NFS heroes plays it strictly for laughs. Oh yes, every obligatory KARATE KID 2 reference, every DIE HARD throw-away line, every fake ROCKY training sequence, and so much more are crammed into the film, courtesy of a screenplay by award-winning writer/producer Milton Liu (JESUS HENRY CHRIST, Festival 2004). It’s hard to imagine that AWESOME ASIAN BAD GUYS was created as a six-episode web series — with a story so deliciously dopey, implausible, and just-plain silly, why couldn’t this heartfelt effort be enjoyed on the big screen first?

Screenings

Saturday, May 03 9:45 PM Directors Guild of America 1
Friday, May 09 9:45 PM Tateuchi Democracy Forum


The project features Al Leong (Die Hard, Lethal Weapon, Big Trouble in Little China), Yuji Okumoto (The Karate Kid, Part II) and George Cheung (Rambo: First Blood Part II). Also starring Dante Basco, Jasmin Currey, Stephen Dypiangco, Patrick Epino, Randall Park, Aaron Takahashi, and Tamlyn Tomita.

 

Check out this link:

Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Fest presents “Awesome Asian Bad Guys” (May 3rd and 9th)