Hong Kong’s ‘McDonald’s Next’  concept elevates ‘Create Your Taste’ dining

McDonald's Hong Kong Create Your Taste burger menu

Brand Channel: (by Abe Sauer)

Dubbed ‘McDonald’s Next,’ the fast food titan reveals a striking new restaurant concept with the launch of its latest Hong Kong location.

McDonald’s first opened its doors in Hong Kong in 1975. Fast-forward 40 years and McDonald’s is pioneering a new dining concept it’s calling McDonald’s Next in the bustling city on the South China Sea.

Billed as a “food bar,” the open-concept eatery is located in the city’s Admiralty area, a major shopping hub (and hang-out for youths) near the main Central district on Hong Kong Island.

McDonald's Next Hong Kong digital create your taste ordering kiosk touchscreen

While a handful of McDonald’s in Hong Kong already offer Create Your Taste digital ordering, the McDonald’s Next location in Admiralty (taglines include: “What’s Next is Now” and “Your creation. Made by us. Worth the wait”) is offering a whole new level of personalization and customer experience for the brand.

McDonald's Next Hong Kong Create Your Taste theater kitchen

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In addition to being open until 1:00 a.m. and offering free mobile device charging and table service after 6:00 pm, what makes the Admiralty location unique is the personalization, interactive design and social nature of the dining experience.

McDonald's Next personalized Hong Kong table service Create Your Taste

Almost like a sushi bar in appearance, customers sidle up to the counter (which McDonald’s calls a theater kitchen) to design and order on touchscreens their customized salads and burgers from the DIY “Create Your Taste” menu that launched in Hong Kong in 2014.

McDonald's Hong Kong Next Create Your Taste #createyourtastehk

McDonald's Next Hong Kong customer #createyourtastehk #cyt

As in other CYT locations, the food is served on a wooden plank with a toothpick flag impaling the burger bun and the fries in mesh wire baskets.

The integrated McCafe menu also includes gourmet coffee in smartly designed packaging, such as premium Ethiopian Sidamo coffee beans bagged in a style that would make third wave coffee snobs swoon.

On the tables, customers will find various makes of charging cords for mobile devices to rejuice their ever-present smartphones.

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Coffee beverages served with latte foam art depicting characters in a marketing tie-in with the new Peanuts movie and a gingerbread man design, part of the local “Hug the Moment” holiday campaign.

McDonald's Next Hong Kong DIY salad Snoopy foam latte

The Internet is in love with this Taiwanese ‘McDonald’s Goddess’

Weiwei_feature

FoodBeast/Next Shark/RocketNews 24 (by Riley Schatzle):

A Taiwanese fast food restaurant employee dubbed the “McDonald’s goddess” has drawn the attention of web users around the world.

The doll-like Wei Han Xu, also known as Weiwei, has been employed part-time at McDonald’s for five years. A blogger by the name of RainDog recently uploaded pictures of the attractive McDonald’s employee wearing a pink uniform, a handkerchief and high heels, calling her the “cutest McDonald’s goddess in Taiwanese history.”

While Wei still enjoys her job taking orders and calling out numbers, she also likes being in front of the camera, as she consistently keeps her Facebook page and Instagram up to date with selfies.

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McDonald’s x nanoblock limited edition toy range sells out in hours in Hong Kong

McDonald’s Japan founder explains why Japanese people are ‘Short and Yellow’

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Next Shark:

Every now and then, we revisit a part of history that some companies would rather be kept swept under the rug. This story comes from the Japanese entrepreneur and self-made billionaire that brought the first McDonald’s to Japan, Den Fujita.

Fujita fell in love with McDonald’s the first time he ate it in 1967 — he was amazed by how popular and efficient the burger chain was. When he saw the opportunity to bring the franchise to Japan, he opened the first Japanese McDonald’s in a Mitsukoshi department store in the Ginza district of Tokyo in 1971. It was an instant success, particularly because of their Japanese-styled Teriyaki McBurger and Chicken Tatsuta.

But perhaps Fujita’s love for the American burger chain extended beyond just the burgers. On his strategy for selling McDonald’s to Japanese people, Fujita is credited as saying:

“The reason Japanese people are so short and have yellow skins is because they have eaten nothing but fish and rice for two thousand years … If we eat McDonald’s hamburgers and potatoes for a thousand years we will become taller, our skin become white, and our hair blonde.”

Does McDonald’s food secretly hold the key to creating a master race? I guess we won’t find out until the year 2971.

It was Fujita’s dream to see 10,000 McDonald’s in Japan by 2010 — as of 2013, there were only 3,164 McDonald’s in Japan, the second most popular country for the fast-food chain after the U.S.

Den Fujita retired in 2003 and died of heart failure in April of 2004 at the age of 78, two days after McDonald’s then-CEO Jim Cantalupo died of a sudden heart attack at the age of 60. It is unknown whether McDonald’s food played a contributing factor in their deaths.

McDonald’s Singapore introduces the Fish McWrap

Fish-McWrap

FoodBeast:

McDonald’s Singapore has released a fish-inspired variation of their Chicken McWrap. You guessed it, the Fish McWrap.

Made with slice of tomatoes, single leaf lettuce and a fried fish patty. The McWrap is served in a flour tortilla with a spicy chili sauce. Essentially, it sounds like a Chicken McWrap with the protein swapped out of a Filet-O-Fish.

While US McDonald’s are cutting all kinds of wraps from their menus, it looks like the Singapore locations will feature them for at least a limited time.

The wrap itself will set you back $5.40. A little on the pricier side, but most seafood items are.

Asian fast food items you won’t find in the U.S.

AsianFastFood_McdolandsJapan

 Audrey Magazine

We first explored KFC menu items that can only be found in Asia, but what about the rest of the well-known American fast-food chains? There are so many yummy menu items only found in Asia that you’ll have to explore (and get hungry) for yourself, but below are some of the more interesting ones we found:

Nacho Fries– Wendy’s, Japan

AsianFastFood_afkinsider

This is definitely not a classic Wendy’s menu item, but who doesn’t love nachos? Wendy’s Japan created the Nacho Fries which consists of classic fries, guacamole, chili, cheese and– for a kick– jalapeños

McRice Burger — McDonald’s, Philippines

AsianFastFood_DramaFever

In the U.S., we rave over the ramen burger. In the Philippines, they sandwich a chicken or beef patty between two crispy rice patties! Could this inspire us to create the next burger trend in the U.S.?

Dry Pork and Seaweed Donut — Dunkin Donuts, China

AsianFastFood_DunkinDonuts

If you thought adding bacon to a maple donut was a bit odd, then you might be hesitant to try this sugar glazed donut topped with dry pork and crunchy seaweed. It sounds like it would be too much of a salty overload rather than a sweet treat.

Ebi Shrimp Filet-O —  McDonald’s, Japan

AsianFastFood_McDonaldsJapan

If you love shrimp, this is all you. It’s a simple fried shrimp patty paired with thousand island dressing and lettuce between their signature sesame seed bun.

Veg Sammi — Subway, India

AsianFastFood_SubwayIndia

If you’re vegetarian and think American fast food doesn’t have enough veggie items, you’re probably right. Subways in India carry a wide array of meat-less options and include ingredients you won’t find in American Subways. For instance, this Veg Sammi consists of a vegetarian kabob made of lentils, garlic and onions.

Green Tea Blizzard — Dairy Queen, Thailand

AsianFastFood_SmartTravel

With the green tea and matcha trend running rampant, why hasn’t this made its way to the U.S. yet? Who doesn’t want to have a green tea blizzard served upside down?

McDonald’s Japan releases Doraemon Happy Meals!

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RocketNews 24:

It’s no secret that McDonald’s Japan has been enthusiastic about collaborating with various anime and character franchises to come up with goodies for children. In the past we’ve seen toys featuring Pokémon and Yokai Watch, as well as Pretty Cure, Super Mario and Transformers, among others, being offered with their Happy Meals, and kids certainly seem to be, well, happy with their Happy Meals, since almost 100 million of these sets are apparently sold in Japan each year.

This month, none other than Doraemon, the time-travelling blue cat robot, makes an appearance as six different Happy Meal toys, and they definitely look ready to delight children across Japan!

The Doraemon toys have just been released from McDonald’s this past Friday, in collaboration with the new movie Doraemon: Nobita’s Space Heroes that is currently being shown in theaters across Japan. 

There are three types of toys available at this moment, and a different set of three toys will be offered starting March 20. Some of them feature Doraemon gadgets we know well (and wish we owned), and we can see how these baubles may get kids excited!

▼ These are the three toys currently available: the “Anywhere Door Game”, “Doraemon and the Spinning Burger” and “Look into it! Scope”.

Dora 3 items 1

▼ And from March 20, these three will become available: the “Run! UFO”, “Exciting! Space Camera” and the “Memory Bread Drawing Kit”.

Dora 3 items 2

Here’s a closer look at each of the items.

▼ The “Anywhere Door Game (Dokodemo Door Game)” is actually a miniature pinball machine in the shape of the Anywhere Door, which has to be one of Doramen’s most popular tools. There’s a different game on each side of the door, so you get two games in one toy.

Dora item 1

▼ The “Doraemon and the Spinning Burger (Doraemon to Kurukuru Burger)” features the Burger Director character that appears in the new movie. With this toy, when you place Doraemon and Burger Director close to each other, the Burger Director will start spinning.

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▼ This “Look Into it! Scope (Nozoite! Scope)” acts as a periscope, and you can look through the lens from the back of the planet on which Doraemon is sitting.

Dora item 3

▼ You can wind up this “Run! UFO (Hashire! UFO)” to propel it forward. What’s neat about this toy is that it can detect and avoid obstacles and also avoid falling off the edge of the table.

Dora item 4

▼ This “Exciting! Space Camera (Dokidoki! Space Camera) lets you see four different Doraemon movie scenes by looking through the lens and turning the dial on the side.

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▼ The “Memory Bread Drawing Kit (Oekaki Anki Pan)” contains five picture cards that you can copy and trace to create 10 different types of illustrations.

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In addition to the toys, the Doraemon Happy Meal comes in three adorable types of boxes, which should also put a smile on kids’ faces.

▼ The boxes all look cute, but we think Dorami-chan in the middle looks particularly charming. The boxes with Doramon’s and Dorami-chan’s face have a bit of a pop-up shape on the top. dora-box

Well, we think these toys actually look quite nifty, and we can easily imagine kids who’ve seen the Doraemon movie begging their parents to take them to McDonald’s for the trinkets. Hmmm … we wonder how many parents will be forced to make six trips to McDonald’s for all the items.

The Happy Meals are available at prices between 432 yen (US$3.56) and 504 yen ($4.15) depending on the food item you choose, but we expect the Doraemon toys will go quickly, so if you plan on getting your hands on one – or a few – of them, you may want to get to a McDonald’s sooner rather than later!

McDonald’s Japan to release “complaint app” to help restore faith in the company

RocketNews 24:

The once mighty fast food chain McDonald’s has fallen on hard times in Japan lately, suffering a heavy blow when it become entangled in an expired meat scandal about a year ago.

Although other establishments were also implicated in the problem, the public in Japan seems to be holding an especially big grudge against the golden arches. On 9 March, the company announced that Japanese sales were down 28.7 percent from the same month in the previous year.

In response, McDonald’s Japan is looking to improve its customer service and restore public faith in the company. How? By releasing a new app for smartphones that will allow customers to lodge complaints with more convenience and speed than ever before!

Yes, much like the chain’s machine-like efficiency at serving up burgers and fries, it will now be just as quick and easy to tell them how much you are worried you may have Ebola because of something you read on the internet.

Up until now, McDonald’s has operated a call center for complaints and requests, but it was only open during standard business hours of nine to five. And as we all know, customer rage can strike at any time of the day.

The new app will allow disgruntled customers to deliver piping hot Mc-beefs to the fast food giant 24 hours a day. McDonald’s intends this feature to also allow customers to make suggestions about the direction in which the company should head in the future. This means that they can expect me to be constantly badgering them from the comfort of my bed about bringing back McPizza.

The McMoanin’ application is sure to be great fun for drunks and belligerent RocketNews24 writers alike, but it’s hard to say how well it will fly with the public at large who have been turning their backs on McDonald’s in droves for 13 straight months of poor sales.

 

 

Fear of food produced in China continues as new report claims at least 48% of it will make you sick

RocketNews 24:

When we think of Chinese food in the West, we usually picture boxes of delicious takeout that are perfect for a mid-movie marathon feeding frenzy, and even better for breakfast the next day. Sure, over-consumption might lead to intense MSG-related headaches and general feelings of bloatedness and guilt, but in general we don’t really think of Chinese food as something that’s likely to kill us. But then again, maybe it’s because we don’t import tons of frozen foodstuffs from China like they do in Japan, where fear of Chinese-produced food is an ever-present topic that regularly pops up to scare the beejeezus out of people and ruin their enjoyment of chicken nuggets forever.

But is there anything to fear, or have people just got their knickers in a twist over nothing? Well, a shocking new report claims that up to 48 percent of ALL the food China produces for export contains stuff that’s almost guaranteed to make you sick. Yikes.

According to news reports, a food standards testing company called Asia Inspection carried out a large-scale investigation into Chinese food factories and workshops, with testing conducted at thousands of sites. The results of the investigation claim that 48 percent of all sites tested produce foodstuffs that contain a variety of nasties highly likely to have a detrimental effect on human health. The reports turned up unacceptable amounts of agricultural chemicals including herbicides and pesticides, as well as trace amounts of antibiotics and industrial heavy metals. Bacteria and viruses were also detected. Filthy conditions in the factories were cited as a likely cause of the contamination, along with shoddy packaging and improper food handling procedures.

▼ Personally, we prefer our spam without the salmonella.

Perhaps these reports aren’t too surprising, though – after all, they’re just the latest in a long string of similar such incidents, including contaminated baby formula, poison pet food, and rat meat being served as lamb. A browse through the “food safety incidents in China” page on Wikipedia lists such grotesqueries as “sewage tofu”, “human hair soy sauce”, “goat urine duck meat”, and “gutter oil”.

With the damning report coming so soon after the tainted chicken scandal that has really messed things up for McDonald’s Japan, we’re betting that more and more people in Japan will start to boycott everything Chinese-made – if the handy switch to the “Made in PRC” labels doesn’t manage to fool ‘em first, that is…