Samsung’s TipTalk is a smartwatch band that lets you listen to voicemails simply by touching your ear

People are skeptical when it comes to wearables because so far, all a smartwatch can do is act as an intermediate between the user and their smartphone. That is, until Samsung unveiled a piece of technology called TipTalk.

What TipTalk does is quite incredible; it sends sounds through the user’s arm (from their wrist) and then when the user places their finger on their ear, they can hear voicemail messages through the unique reverberation.

Samsung have not commented on whether this technology will be implemented in future wearables, but in a market that is slowly becoming super-saturated, it’s good to know that the technology giant has a few incredibly innovative aces up its sleeve.

The Chinese have a way of messaging that’s way better and safer than texting

Commuters use smartphone

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The Chinese have been messaging each other in a way that almost puts texting to shame given how many accidents we’ve had from walking while texting or the often fatal driving while texting.

Rather than glue their eyes and attention to the screen for those crucial moments while they type, most Chinese people use voice messaging.

No, it’s not at all a new way of communicating, but voice messaging is now the norm on WeChat, the messaging app with over 500 million monthly users, according to Quartz.

texts

Push-to-talk messaging’s growth in Asia is widely attributed to the difficulty of typing in Chinese. Vocally messaging people is just simpler and more personal, but also loud.

Specifically in China, the custom is more widely accepted than in other Chinese-speaking countries like Taiwan, where loud voice messaging in public would be frowned upon for being rude.

Thomas Luo, the founder of the leading Chinese tech blog Pingwest, told Quartz:

Chinese and Taiwanese express themselves very differently. For me, I always speak loudly, even in my office. But Taiwanese people are more quiet.”

Like any culture, the Chinese adhere to specific formalities in communication that might otherwise be unacceptable elsewhere. In the digital age, voice messaging found its popularity from the internet cafe culture of the mid-2000s when gamers sent voice messages rather then texts. When mobile was introduced, those habits carried on.

Luo also attributed voice messaging habits to educational backgrounds:

People that aren’t very well-educated will use voice messages no matter what, whether the sentences are long or only one second. But middle-class or well-educated people will send voice messages if they want to say something that is informal but also complicated. If it’s simple, they’ll just type.”

Would voice messaging in public be acceptable in a country like the U.S. where talking loudly on your phone in public isn’t that all unheard of? Maybe not in public, but it’s definitely the safer alternative when you are driving in the privacy of your car.

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium: The first smartphone with a 4K display

The recently announced Sony Xperia Z5 Premium can boast of being the world’s first production smartphone with a 4K display, by way of a 5.5-inch screen and 3840 x 2160 pixel resolution, equating to an unparalleled 806 pixels per inch.

However, Sony also claims the Z5 has a two-day battery life, defying conventional wisdom that a higher-resolution screen consumes more power. To achieve this feat, Sony engineered the Z5 to only display photos and videos at the ultra-high 4K resolution, while all other content is displayed at 1080p Full HD for battery conservation purposes.

Otherwise, the Z5′s other selling points include complete waterproofing, 4K video recording with image stabilization, a 64-bit octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, and a 23MP rear camera. While pricing and availability is yet to be announced, you can find more details here.

Samsung’s Galaxy A8 is its slimmest phone to date

Although many of us are eagerly awaiting to hear more about the iPhone 6S, Samsung recently launched its slimmest phone to date in rather quiet fashion. The Galaxy A8, features a full-metal body who’s width measures in at an impressive 5.9mm, when comparing it to its A7predecessor’s 6.3 mm thickness.

The Korean tech giant’s latest mid-range model is also boasts a 5.7-inch 1080p OLED display and a 16-megapixel rear camera, along with a 3,050mAh battery that’s larger than the Galaxy S6 model. Subtle tweaks like the inclusion of a fingerprint sensor and a hand-wave detection system that allows for easy self-timer photos have also enhanced user experience.

Those interested in purchasing one will have to wait for the time being, as the Galaxy A8 is only available in China as of now.

Samsung unveils the Iron Man-themed Galaxy S6 Edge

Further to its teaser, Samsung has released a limited edition of its Galaxy S6 Edge in the distinctive red-and-gold livery of Marvel superhero Iron Man, as a promotion for Avengers: Age of Ultron.

The 64GB model features red brushed metal body accented with gold along the peripheral frame as well as around the camera lens and home button, and comes packaged with an “arc reactor” wireless charging pad. The Iron Man theme continues with a special skin to spice up the UI experience. However, the lack of J.A.R.V.I.S. leaves a conspicuous absence, with only Google Now to make up for it.

First releasing in South Korea on May 27, the phone will make its way to China and Hong Kong in June. In the meanwhile, watch the unboxing video below.

Apple’s $930 Million lawsuit against Samsung gets partially reversed

The never-ending saga between Apple and Samsung gets another chapter in its books, as the Korean mobile communications giant has just received a partial reversal on its 2012 lawsuit loss.

For a refresher, back in 2012, Apple sued Samsung over violating intellectual property, resulting in a whopping $930 million USD settlement. During the height of the trial, Apple presented several examples of unregistered trade dress which they claimed Samsung infringed upon for its Galaxy S and Nexus S devices. Trade dress protection applies to design elements that are nonfunctional, with Apple citing examples such as ”a rectangular product with four evenly rounded corners” and “a flat, clear surface covering the front of the product” as instances that were purely just for aesthetics and have no impact on usability for the suit.

However, a Federal Circuit Court of Appeals revisited the trial earlier today and ruled that while Samsung did indeed infringe upon Apple’s design patents, it did not with Apple’s trade dress. According to the court, “the requirement that the unregistered trade dress ‘serves no purpose other than identification’ cannot be reasonably inferred from the evidence.

Therefore, the court has asked for an update on the damages to be awarded, which should come out to around a $382 million USD discount for Samsung.

Dominos is letting you place orders with pizza Emojis

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FoodBeast:

Domino’s sure goes out of its way to make ordering pizzas ridiculously easy. In a recent Twitter announcement by the pizza chain, customers can now order themselves a pie by simply tweeting an emoji.

By tweeting the “Pizza” emoji to @Dominos, the restaurant will deliver a pizza to you. All customers have to do is sign up for the online Domino’s Profile and they can start getting easy-order pizzas. Once tweeted, Domino’s will send them a confirmation of their order and a pizza should be on the way.

CEO Patrick Doyle told USA Today that this process is the “epitome of convenience” and that the brand whittled it down to a five-second process.

The program will start May 20 and, according to the company, be here indefinitely.