Model suing after Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic’s ad turns into a cruel meme on, claims it ruined her life

Model Heidi Yeh posed for this image which was to be used in an ad campaign for a cosmetic surgery clinic. However, an internet user gave it a different caption and turned it into a meme which spread like wildfire

Daily Mail UK (by Siofra Brennan):

A model who starred in an advert for plastic surgery says her life has been ruined after her image was turned into a notorious internet meme that went global.

Heidi Yeh, from Taiwan, is suing the clinic for damages after she posed alongside a male model as the beautiful parents of three aesthetically-challenged children. Their features were digitally altered to make their eyes look small and their noses flat, and the original caption read: ‘The only thing you’ll ever have to worry about is how to explain it to the kids.’

However, the photo made its way onto the internet where it was turned into a meme with the caption, ‘Plastic Surgery: You can’t hide it forever.

In an emotional interview with the BBC’s Cindy Sui, Heidi said that losing control of the image has ruined her career and her personal life.

A boyfriend split up with her because of the constant embarrassing rumors about her, and she had to endure people gossiping about her in the street.

I’ve broken down many times crying and I haven’t been able to sleep,’ she confessed.

The biggest loss for me is I don’t want to be a model anymore. Just because I’m a model, people can hurt me like this and I can’t fight back. I just want to hide.

Heidi, who had previously modeled for fast food chain KFC and Japanese beauty brands, originally posed for the shoot back in 2012.

It was intended to be used as part of a campaign for a Taiwanese cosmetic surgery clinic.

Heidi insists that her modeling agency signed a contract with US-based international advertising agency J Walter Thompson (JWT), stating that the image would only be used by one clinic in Taiwan. The agreement also allegedly ensured that her photograph could only be reproduced in newspapers and magazines. However, JWT subsequently allowed another plastic surgery provider called Simple Beauty to use the image.

They also posted it on their Facebook page, and it quickly spread across the internet. The image was turned into various memes all poking fun at the people featured.

To make matters worse, a Chinese newspaper then used it to illustrate a fake story about a man who became suspicious about his wife’s looks after she gave birth to ugly children. He then discovered she’d had cosmetic surgery before they met and decided to sue her for deceiving him.

When I first heard about this from a friend, I thought it was just a one-off rumor,’ said Ms Yeh.

Then I realised the whole world was spreading it and in different languages. People actually thought it was real. Even my then-boyfriend’s friends would ask about it.

As well as the impact on her personal life, she said her modeling career went downhill because of her notoriety.

People refused to believe that I had never had plastic surgery,’ she said.

Clients would ask me if I was the woman in the picture. After this, I only got small roles in advertisements.’

She says she’s lost around $4million new Taiwan dollars – the equivalent of £80,000 or $150,000 US dollars – in earnings because of the meme. Despite repeated attempts by Heidi and her modeling agency, she only recently managed to get the clinic and JWT to remove the image from their websites.

She says they only acted after she made a threat to sue both companies at a press conference. Now, she’s pressing ahead with her claim and is demanding $5million new Taiwan dollars in damages. However she insists that money is not her priority, and that she just wants people to know the truth about the image.

A spokesperson for JWT told FEMAIL the campaign was created to ‘promote plastic surgery services in a humorous manner.

He said the company own all the rights to the photo including copyright, giving them full rights to edit, modify and use the image.

Our campaign was created for print publication in the Taiwan market. With technology, smart phone cameras and social media, however, even a print ad can go viral,’ he said.

We can’t anticipate what degree an impact it will have, how people will view it, and what they will do with it.’

But Heidi’s lawyer Chang Yu-chi said: ‘

We gave you the copyright and the right to edit it, but we didn’t give you the right to let another company use it, and to use it online.’

Former Maxim model becomes Korea’s ‘Most Beautiful Police Officer’

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Next Shark (by Riley Schatzle):

A police officer is gaining attention in Korea for her gender and good looks.

Kim Miso was nominated for Miss Maxim Korea in 2014, however, she is now pursuing a career where she can protect and serve. According to Korea’s Dispatch, the 25-year-old Miso left modeling behind, trained at the Central Police Academy and now works for the Seoul Metropolitan Police Department.

She has since been dubbed the “most beautiful police officer in Korea.”Miso_08Miso_04

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Supermodel Jourdan Dunn heads to Thailand for her new cooking series “How It’s Dunn”

Hypebeast:

Supermodel Jourdan Dunn has teamed up with Amuse to create a cooking program titled How It’s Dunn.

The model talks about her experiences with cooking and her taste for spicy food and in the first installment of the new series, Dunn takes to the streets of Thailand to explore the country’s local cuisine and test the boundaries of her own tolerance to spice. From sauntering through fresh-food markets to braving cow’s blood noodle soup, this is only just the beginning of Dunn’s culinary pursuits.

Stay tuned for future episodes as they become available.

Adrianne Ho of “Sweat The Style” talks about her collaboration with PacSun


Hypebeast:

Adrianne Ho is a model, healthy lifestyle advocate and founder of the website Sweat The StyleShe has developed a massive following based on her natural beauty, modeling prowess and ability to self-style incredible streetwear looks. Ho also has a line of activewear called Sweat x Sweat the Style and has recently announced a new collaboration with PacSun dubbed “Sweat Crew by Adrianne Ho.”

Consisting of mesh jerseys, bombers, hoodies and baseball shirts, the affordable collection is the personification of Ho’s self-made brand. In the interview below, she talks about working with PacSun and the current state of activewear, along with basic Instagram etiquette and the importance of living a clean and healthy life.

How’d this PacSun collaboration happen?
They just approached and wanted to create a brand together. It was a great opportunity because there was nothing out there that really spoke to me, so this is it.

What has PacSun has given you in terms of resources, and creative freedom that you haven’t been able to get from other outlets?
This collection is my collection; they were an amazing partner to come up with this brand. It’s going to be really exciting to see in stores. I think they have around 600 stores across the country. Being able to have that reach is great—a girl who might not necessarily buy something or even know what this brand is can actually discover it on her own, love it, and wear it.

Is there a specific woman in mind when you think of who’s wearing these clothes?
This is for everybody. Everything in this collection you could mix and match and it would look good. Red goes with camouflage, goes well with gray, goes well with black. Pinstripe looks good with camouflage. You can seriously get dressed in the morning with this collection blindfolded and you will come out looking good.

The big buzzword right now is “athleisure,” do you worry that people will try to categorize this collection under that?
This is sportswear. People can throw it into that category if they want because it’s a buzzword, but to me I would call it sportswear.

I don’t have anything against the word “athleisure”, because people need to have an aim to describe this movement and I think now everything is becoming so popular and people are getting more into health and fitness and style is reflecting on that. It’s a category of something that already exists.

People like something they can make into a hashtag.
Yeah, and for me this movement going to be here to stay. I think once you start living this lifestyle, you can’t really go back.

Health and wellness and fitness is a new status symbol. Everybody’s doing it, even Russell Simmons is on the yoga tip. How does that reflect what society values now and what the aspirations are?
I think nowadays people are really savvy and aware about their health and the way they want to live their life. Style and culture is only going to reflect how people live. I think that’s the driving force. I mean, everybody wants to look good, and the only way to do it is to take care of yourself. Eat well, exercise and put out the best version of you.

Female athletes like Ronda Rousey and Serena Williams, legends in their own right, are starting to become noticed by the fashion world. Why do you think female athletes have yet to be embraced in the fashion world the same way that male athletes are?
I think it’s only a matter of time. I personally love Serena, she was just in Vogue recently, and I think that female athletes are going to get more and more of the spotlight beyond their respective sport as time goes on. Growing up, girls are now going to have heroes to look up to, I think definitely female athletes are people that everyone—women especially, can aspire to.

Do you think it’s about time that Serena has her name on a sneaker?
Oh yeah, that would be awesome. She has a great sense of style. She’s very much her own person which I love about her. Tennis seems like a very conservative sport, so I love watching documentaries and seeing her and her sister come out with their attitude and their swag, making people do a double take.

Speaking of sneakers, what’s your current rotation looking like these days?
Huaraches—I have a pair with me right now. I got these on right now, they’re being released on Saturday, the NikeLab Free Inneva. I love these. Flyknits are always a fave of mine.

What do you think of the rumored Supreme Jordans? Would you rock them?
To be honest, I don’t have any Jordans. I didn’t really grow up wearing Jordans or playing basketball..

Air Maxes are seem more your lane.
Air Max, Flyknits, I really like an active sneaker that you can work out in or do exercise, not just basketball.

Do you have the Yeezy Boost 350s?
I have the grey ones.

What do you think of them?
They’re pretty comfortable, I wouldn’t go for a run in them. I think they’re cool.

What do you think of Supreme’s Fall collection?
Everything looks incredible.

Any favorite pieces that you saw and you were just like: “I need that?”
I have to take another look. Some of their jackets, like the one with the diamonds, looked really cool. It was a really strong overall collection.

Your social media following is huge and you get a lot of comments, and not all of them are the nicest. Is there a way you deal with thirsty comments on Instagram or did you develop a way to ignore that?
If there’s a mean comment I don’t think about it too much, I try not to. Positivity is my thing, if there’s one comment that’s a diss everyone’s going to stop and be like “What?” Overall, everyone that follows me and knows me has been super nice and supportive.

What’s a good guideline for a guy who wants to leave a complimentary comment without sounding like a creep?
I would say a good guideline would be asking yourself: “Would my mother approve?” Like, would you be embarrassed if someone else in your family read this comment? Then you probably shouldn’t put it up.

What’s been your biggest adjustment in moving from New York to LA? Do you have preference between the cities yet?
I think they’re both really important places. I think L.A.  is a little easier to keep your head down and work work work. When you go to New York you can mingle and interact and get inspiration and put everything out. For me it’s been important to have that balance.

What’s up with the Roots collab hinted at in your piece on The Coveteur, is that happening soon?
Maybe. You have to wait and find out.

Is there any advice you would pass on to a young person who wants to create her or his own brand some day?
Make sure your inspiration comes from within—something to do with your lifestyle, your history, your background, your personality, your story. Have a clear vision of when it comes out so it doesn’t end up falling into trends, which is something I hate doing. With this collection, I don’t see anything like this in a woman’s lane that’s similar at all. Maybe a couple seasons from now. Always be forward. That way if someone’s looking, following or getting inspiration from this, we’ll be on to the next thing, which is fine. You know when it’s from within your history, your background and everything. You have your clear vision and you can stick to it. Whether that’s sportswear or fashion. Know your lane.

Head to sweatthestyle.com to keep up with Adrianne’s projects.

NikeCourt “On-Court/Off-Court” editorial by Adrianne Ho and “Sweat The Style” for Monocle Magazine

15 of the most amazing home-made robots, tanks, and vehicles in China

xing-yile-l-a-26-year-old-middle-school-art-teacher-took-two-months-to-build-a-homemade-replica-of-the-hulkbuster-iron-man-armoured-suit-from-the-movie-avengers-age-of-ultron

RocketNews 24:

China is known as an industrious nation and, after pictures surfaced of one Chinese teacher who built a phenomenal “Iron Man” Hulkbuster replica in his garage, it seemed like the right time to take a look at some of the country’s most impressive home made inventions.

From full size, working airplanes to wooden, yet electronic cars, the Chinese have spent anything from a couple of months to several years, knocking up some pretty impressive modes of transports and robots.

Liu Fulong from the Shenyang, Liaoning province created a wooden electronic vehicle at home, which has a top speed of 30km/h.liu-fulong-from-the-shenyang-liaoning-province-created-a-wooden-electronic-vehicle-at-home-which-has-a-top-speed-of-30kmh

Yu Jietao, 26-year-old wood carver, also saw the potential in wooden vehicles and spent 100,000 yuan (£10,247, $16,010) on his invention. It can travel as fast as 30 km/h per hour.yu-jietao-26-year-old-wood-carver-also-saw-the-potential-in-wooden-vehicles-and-spent-100000-yuan-10247-16010-on-his-invention-it-can-travel-as-fast-as-30-kmh-per-hour

In the Shiyan, Hubei province, Su Daocheng spent two months building a home made mechanical horse to travel around in.in-the-shiyan-hubei-province-su-daocheng-spent-two-months-building-a-home-made-mechanical-horse-to-travel-around-in

A man only identified as Abulajon, in the Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region in China, spent 8000 yuan (£820, $1300) to create the 0.3 tonnes motorcycle. However, measuring 14 feet (4.3 metres) in length and 7.8 feet (2.4 metres) in height, makes it impossible for him to drive it on the street.a-man-only-identified-as-abulajon-in-the-xinjiang-uighur-autonomous-region-in-china-spent-8000-yuan-820-1300-to-create-the-03-tonnes-motorcycle-however-measuring-14-feet-43-metres-in-length-and-78-feet-24-metres-in-height-makes-it-impossibl

He Liang went for the minimalist option and spent a decade turning a suitcase into a motor-driven vehicle. It has a top speed of 20km/h.he-liang-went-for-the-minimalist-option-and-spent-a-decade-turning-a-suitcase-into-a-motor-driven-vehicle-it-has-a-top-speed-of-20kmh

Here, an unidentified man from the Heilongjiang province created a home made 12 brooms tied in the rear to help him clean the road in Mohe.
here-an-unidentified-man-from-the-heilongjiang-province-created-a-home-made-12-brooms-tied-in-the-rear-to-help-him-clean-the-road-in-mohe

Yang Shijun, a 45-year-old manager of a construction material company, spent 100,000 yuan (£10,228, $16,098) and one year of his time to make this plane. Yang said he made it as a tribute to his father who passed away in 2011 but had been a pilot for 29 years.yang-shijun-a-45-year-old-manager-of-a-construction-material-company-spent-100000-yuan-10228-16098-and-one-year-of-his-time-to-make-this-plane-yang-said-he-made-it-as-a-tribute-to-his-father-who-passed-away-in-2011-but-had-been-a-pilot-for-
Meanwhile, Liu Shijie, a 35-year-old farmer from the Huaibei, Anhui province, took six months and spent 30,000 yuan (£3,074, $4,850) to make a homemade armoured vehicle.meanwhile-liu-shijie-a-35-year-old-farmer-from-the-huaibei-anhui-province-took-six-months-and-spent-30000-yuan-3074-4850-to-make-a-homemade-armoured-vehicle

Another farmer, Zhang Wuyi, 37, created a multi-seater submarine at home to help harvest aquatic products, such as sea cucumber. He sold his invention to sold to a businessman in Dalian at a price of 100,000 yuan (£10,248, $15,855) in 2014.another-farmer-zhang-wuyi-37-created-a-multi-seater-submarine-at-home-to-help-harvest-aquatic-products-such-as-sea-cucumber-he-sold-his-invention-to-sold-to-a-businessman-in-dalian-at-a-price-of-100000-yuan-10248-15855-in-2014

Yang Zongfu spent two years creating a ball container named Noah’s Ark of China. It is capable of housing a three-person family and sufficient enough food for them to live for 10 months.yang-zongfu-spent-two-years-creating-a-ball-container-named-noahs-ark-of-china-it-is-capable-of-housing-a-three-person-family-and-sufficient-enough-food-for-them-to-live-for-10-months

Tan Yong, a 44-year-old farmer, created a home-made submarine at a lake in Dangjiangkou, Hubei province. He spent five months building it and now it is capable of diving to a depth of 10 metres.tan-yong-a-44-year-old-farmer-created-a-home-made-submarine-at-a-lake-in-dangjiangkou-hubei-province-he-spent-five-months-building-it-and-now-it-is-capable-of-diving-to-a-depth-of-10-metres

Farmer Wu Yulu started to build robots in 1986 and, by 2009, he unveiled this rickshaw that is being pulled by a robot.farmer-wu-yulu-started-to-build-robots-in-1986-and-by-2009-he-unveiled-this-rickshaw-that-is-being-pulled-by-a-robot

In Beijing, self-taught inventor Tao Xiangli spent less than a year and 300,000 yuan (£30,750, $49,037) to create a home made humanoid robot with a remote controller. However, it is too heavy and too tall to walk out of his front door.china-invention-8

Xing Yile (L), a 26-year-old middle school art teacher, took two months to build a homemade replica of the Hulkbuster “Iron Man” armoured suit from the movie “Avengers: Age of Ultron.”xing-yile-l-a-26-year-old-middle-school-art-teacher-took-two-months-to-build-a-homemade-replica-of-the-hulkbuster-iron-man-armoured-suit-from-the-movie-avengers-age-of-ultron

A man in China identified only as “Xing” made this suit in a parking lot.

Meanwhile, Li Lei from Shanghai builds an array of “Transformers” robot replicas for rent and for sale.meanwhile-li-lei-from-shanghai-builds-an-array-of-transformers-robot-replicas-for-rent-and-for-sale

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Adrianne Ho rocks “Sweat The Style” at the Chateau Marmont for The Coveteur