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Exhibit in Kyoto features collaboration of anime and 400-year-old Rinpa school of painting

 

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RocketNews 24 (by Kay):

This is what happens when you combine centuries-old traditional Japanese painting with modern anime, and we love it!

If you’re interested in traditional Japanese art, you may be familiar with the Rinpa school of painting, which has a history that can be traced all the way back to the 17th century. It so happens that this year marks the 400th anniversary since one of the school’s founders, Hon’ami Kōetsu, established an artistic community (geijutsumura) in the Takagamine area of Kyoto, and an exciting commemorative event titled the “Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit” is now going on in the very same city of Kyoto, courtesy of brilliant artwork produced by the anime/comic merchandise retailer CHARA-ANI.

But before we go on, here’s a little bit more background on Rinpa art. The Rinpa school, which has a heavy emphasis on painting but also includes other crafts such as ceramics and lacquerware as well as calligraphy, is thought to have been founded by Hon’ami Kōetsu and Tawaraya Sōtatsu around the early 17th century and later consolidated in the latter half of the century by the prominent artist brothers  Ogata Kōrin and Ogata Kenzan. The name Rinpa is actually a combination of the last syllable of Kōrin’s name and the word “pa” for school.

The school’s art style is known for its bold design compositions, use of silver and gold leaf in the background, and repeated use of recognizable patterns. While natural scenes including flowers and trees are often depicted, animals and people from folktales are also common subjects, like the deities depicted in the famous ”Wind and Thunder Gods” folding screens (Fūjin Raijin-zu) by Sōtatsu.

▼ The magnificent Wind and Thunder Gods folding screen by Sōtatsu:

Fujin

So, taking all of that into consideration, we think you’ll understand why we might be excited by the idea of a collaboration between anime and the Rinpa school, which has a history of producing such notable works of art. And what’s attracting particular attention in this “Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit” are the works featuring the long-loved characters created by the manga master Osamu Tezuka himself!

The glittering gold and silver, along with the texture of Japanese paper, have turned Tezuka’s characters into breathtaking, timeless works of art.

▼ Here’s Tezuka’s phoenix (Hi no Tori), a perfect subject for Rinpa-style art, depicted in brilliant gold.

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▼ The father and son lion duo from Kimba the White Lion (Jungle Taitei) looks full of life in this piece.

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In addition to the collaboration with Tezuka anime, you’ll also be able to see on display Rinpa-style art featuring the busy-as-ever Hello Kitty, as well as characters from Lucky Star (Raki☆Suta).

The best part is that you can actually order and purchase some of these illustrations at the exhibit, and they apparently have some stationery and smartphone accessories on sale as well.

The Rinpa x Anime Homage Exhibit will run at the Kyoto Loft department store in the Mina Kyoto shopping complex until January 17, 2016 (except for January 1, when Mina Kyoto will be closed). It could be a fun destination for art and anime fans who are in Kyoto for the new year!

Source: CHARA-ANI websitePR TIMES press release

Ikenaga Yasunari’s dream-like paintings of women using the traditional Japanese style of Nihonga

Ikenaga Yasunari - Painting

Beautiful Decay (by Hayley Evans): 

Ikenaga Yasunari paints tranquil portraits of women immersed in elegant floral patterns. His work is a curious blend of traditional Japanese-style paintings (nihonga) and modern imagery. Whereas nihonga manifests itself in Yasunari’s bold, monochromatic contrasts and the absence of outlines in the patterns, the subjects are all donned in modern clothing, and their hair and makeup also convey a distinctly contemporary style. Yasunari’s chosen materials are based in tradition, involving a combination of sumi-ink (soot ink) and mineral pigments painted on linen cloth. In exploring modern subjects using traditional techniques, he reinvests an older cultural, artistic practice with an ongoing significance.

The beauty of Yasunari’s work arrives in the interplay between complexity and serenity; much like Gustav Klimt’s decorative paintings wherein patterns coalesce around a highlighted female figure, Yasunari’s works strike a balance between the undulating, seamless background and the subject embraced in its flow. The gentle sepia tones likewise enhance the paintings’ quiet, almost autumnal, atmosphere. Blending gentle imagery with harmonious compositions, Yasunari’s works are meditative portraits embodying youth, reverie, and dreams.

Visit Yasunari’s website to view more of his works.

Ikenaga Yasunari - Painting

Ikenaga Yasunari - Painting

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Sonya Fu’s digital dreamscape paintings

Sonya Fu - PaintingBeautiful Decay (by Stephanie Chan):

Sonya Fu’s digital paintings seek to open the third eye and unlock the limbo between wakefulness and sleep. Rendered in soft vibrant colors, her characters are lit up, though from within or without we are uncertain. Shapes and bubbles of light play on their faces, like projections from an unknown dimension. Their half-closed dreaming eyes add to the eerie yet somehow peaceful quality of the paintings, as though we’re witnessing some mystical wandering of the mind.

Art is a powerful visual language and creating art is a calming and therapeutic process,” Fu says. “I would like to share with people my dreamscape, its beauty and its oddity.

It might be an eerie creature, a whimsical scenery or a disturbed beauty who speaks words of wisdom – they are all embodiments of my subconscious mind.

Sonya Fu - Painting

Sonya Fu - Painting

Sonya Fu - Painting

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Case Studyo collaborates with Tokyo-based artist Tomoo Gokita for ‘A Bathing Beauty’ sculpture

Case Studyo has collaborated with Tokyo-based artist Tomoo Gokita to create a sculpture made of bronze based off of his 2014 A Bathing Beauty painting. Rendered in monochromatic hues, the 3D figures reflect Gokita’s signature style of work where the “formal shapes and souvenirs of black and white colors are blended with each other.

Reminiscent of a black and white Hollywood movie, the sculptures measure in at 28 x 22cm and are packaged in a custom silkscreened wooden box that comes complete with a signed certificate of authenticity.

Rainbow Tse, a teenage Hong Kong artist to watch at the Asia Contemporary Art Show

Tse with “BLUR”

Coconuts Hong Kong:

Hong Kong is turning international heads for its blossoming art scene, with the city now going Art Basel-crazy every year, and art shows of every conceivable theme piggybacking off its success.

But the city is in danger of having its own artists’ voices buried by the influx of works from established names of the West, whether Pablo Picasso or Paul McCarthy.

Thankfully, the Asia Contemporary Art Show is making sure to showcase local artists like Rainbow Tse, only 18 years old.

Her watercolors depict the beauty of the city in a way that only a true local can. She transforms a mundane car ride – one familiar to hundreds of commuters – into a larger-than-life, dreamy scene, where car lights and sunlight mingle to create beautiful, vibrant colors.

Compositionally, I focus on the light source of the piece,” Tse told us via email. “I often use the wet-on-wet watercolor technique in my paintings, mainly because it is able to create a very flowing and soft effect.

Tse chooses to paint familiar Hong Kong scenes to tap into the emotions people may have already associated with them.

One environment can hold so many different memories and experiences to different people,” she explains. “So by expressing certain moods and atmospheres in a painting, it can draw the audience into experiencing the scene and evoking memories of their own.

I am very excited about exhibiting at the Asia Contemporary Art Show,” she gushed. “I remember visiting this show last year, looking at all the great artists and their work. I am very happy to be part of it this year!

Tse, only 18 years old, will be exhibiting her paintings for the first time at this year’s edition of the show. The young artist hopes to inspire busy Hongkongers to remember to pause and look around them.

Individuals often rush from one place to another and don’t notice the environment around them,” she laments. “Through art they can experience the beauty that is in this world.”

What: Asia Contemporary Art Show
When: March 12 – 15, 2015. Get the times here
Where: 40 – 44th floors, Conrad Hong Kong, Pacific Place, Admiralty. (Google Maps)
Price: VIP: HKD260; Standard: HKD180 (admits two if purchased online; admits one if purchased at the door).
Tickets: Get them here

 

“Golden Hour” (Sold)

 

“The Road Back” (Sold)

“Workplace” 

 

 “Sunset Saunter” (Sold)

 

“Cyber” (Sold)

 

“Rooftop” (Sold)

 

“Red Glow”

“Festivity” (Sold)

 

“After Work”

 

“Captivated”

 

“6 PM” (Sold)

 

Street Art: POW WOW! Taiwan- Summer Episode Video

Back in September, Hypebeast published a write-up about CANLOVE, the artistic duo comprised of DJ Neff and Paul Ramirez dedicated to transforming empty spray cans into the very thing they’re used to produce: art.

Over the summer, POW! WOW! Taiwan and Fubon Art Foundation enlisted their help to create colorful installations out of 900 discarded canisters, all painstakingly collected by volunteers post-festival. In October, a quick 30 second trailer to a short called the Summer Episode was released, which offered a glimpse of Neff and Ramirez at work, plus a few shots of some murals. The full clip is now up online, and not only does it feature CANLOVE cutting and spraying away for the project, but we also get brief commentary from artists Will Barras and Reach about their thoughts and experiences painting large walls.

Takashi Murakami “In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow” @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Contemporary Japanese artist Takashi Murakami is currently showcasing his major exhibition, titled ”In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow,” at Gagosian Gallery New York. A range of new paintings and sculptures was created as a result of Murakami’s exploration of Japanese art made following historic natural disasters.

Combining classical techniques with the latest technologies, the artworks feature elements of religious symbols, self-portraits, science fiction and manga imagery. The ”In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow” exhibition will run until January 17, 2015, so make sure to check it out if you’re in the area.

 

Gagosian Gallery New York
555 W. 24th St.
New York, NY 10011
United States

 

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

 Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York

Image of Takashi Murakami "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" @ Gagosian Gallery New York