the POOL aoyama “SWIM in the POOL” Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

 

Hiroshi Fujiwara‘s the POOL aoyama presents its “SWIM in the POOL” editorial to showcase the wide-ranging selection of special products created for it. The product of collaborations with the likes of StussyretaW, Disney, and Nike, the collection includes apparel, accessories and lifestyle goods.

Cast your eyes over the editorial to see the latest pieces from the POOL aoyama and stay tuned for more releases via its webpage.

 

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

Image of the POOL aoyama "SWIM in the POOL" Editorial

 

Artist Profile: “TOKYOKEI” by photographer Issei Suda

Juxtapoz:

 

During the 1970’s and 80’s photographer Issei Suda documented the streets of Tokyo. Whilst the sidewalks are busy with a myriad of people, businesses and the hustle and bustle of a city, the streets that Suda captured are a far away vision compared to the images we see today of the modern mega-city.

Suda has managed to document an element of mysteriousness and of hidden stories, permeating this series with a sense of vitality and intrigue. We see a couple with their backs turned away, wearing long city overcoats they look out across palm trees which silhouette themselves onto their backs; men in suits about to conduct their work look nonchalantly over their shoulders or wearing shades down at the ground, a man kissing a budgie and a curtain of glistening fish tails hanging from the ceiling. Each image exacts its own marker as a moment in this period of Tokyo’s significant history. Evoking a sense of longing for a time when unique obscurities could be noticed.

As Suda states: “The Tokyo of my youth has vanished, but still there are times when I feel joyously nostalgic, sensing the happiness at festivals…or observing the unconscious actions of passers-by.”

 

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Link

Artist Profile: Everyday life in Indonesian villages captured by photographer Herman Damar

 

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Bored Panda:

Herman Damar, a self-taught photographer in Indonesia, has captured beautiful moments from the everyday lives of villagers living outside of Jakarta, the nation’s capital. His photographs, especially of happy children at play, paint a picture of the idyllic wonder and natural beauty of Indonesian village life. This advertisement director-turned-hobbyist photographer agreed to answer some of Bored Panda’s questions about his work.

Damar’s photography, which he shoots with a Canon 550D, is beautiful for its intimate and colorful portrayal of village life, but arguably the most heartwarming photos are of village children at play. Their rafts, water guns and spears show that they have no lack of imagination or of things to do.

 

Indonesian people are very diverse and humble, they are very happy when I take a shoot“ Damar told Bored Panda.

The best thing is, I can be in direct contact with them, their happiness and their lives, and I am very happy to capture in my camera

 

Most of Damar’s photos “are captured spontaneously, but sometimes I help to direct [their] poses

 

Source: 500px.com | Facebook

 

These images were taken in villages “on the outskirts of Jakarta, unspoiled [by] technological advances

Indonesia is very rich in culture and have a thousands of beautiful islands, Indonesian people are very friendly.

Damar said that the best way to capture photos like his was to spend more time among the people “to better understand their culture and their character, and the best time is in the morning between the 7-9 am

Link

Artist Profile: Photographer Kalpesh Lathigra

 

Juxtapoz:

 

Whether shooting personal work or being commissioned to shoot photo essays, Kalpesh Lathigra, has a way with conveying stories through imagery. The London-based photographer has amassed a large body of work covering differing subjects over the years and has won several awards, which include The W. Eugene Smith Fellowship and Churchill Fellowship.

He is currently working on a series provisionally titled “ Wilmington/Mingo ” in the USA and his first book “Lost in the Wilderness” will be published in 2014.

There’s a lot more work than presented here, so take some time and have a look around Lathigra’s website.

 

Check out this link:

 

Artist Profile: Photographer Kalpesh Lathigra

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Link

Artist Profile: Female portraits by Japanese photographer Zuru1024

 

Ignant:

Japanese photographer Zuru1024 is mainly shooting portraits of women that he shows on his Flickr.

We’ve seen many pictures from the artist floating around on Tumblr and are glad to finally introduce the talent behind the camera.
He is putting his lens right in the middle of it all, taking intimate, sometimes even provoking pictures. Here are some of our favorites.

Check out this link:

All images © Zuru1024

Link

Artist Profile: Hong Kong-based photographer Miss Bean

 

Ignant:

Miss Bean is an independent photographer and visual artist currently based in Hong Kong. With a sensitive eye for certain moods and moments, she shoots her pictures that seem so natural and delicate. She mainly photographs girls, telling a wonderful tale of youth and dreams.

Check out this link:

All images © Miss Bean | Via: This is Paper

Link

Artist Profile: Natsumi Hayashi’s levitating self-portraits

 

My Modern Met:

 

Natsumi Hayashi is a sweet-looking Japanese girl who, one day, decided to take self-portraits..of herself levitating. She can be spotted in and around Tokyo, equipped with her SLR and her self-timer. When she feels the moment strike, she presses the shutter button down and then, quite literally, “jumps” into place.

What I love most about her shots is that they don’t feel forced. Natsumi has a way of making us feel as though she naturally levitates throughout life.

When I asked her how others react to her jumping around Tokyo, here is a funny story that she shared. “One day, when I was jumping at a famous sightseeing spot in western Tokyo, workers at a souvenir shop were frightened by how I was jumping. They were whispering things like ‘Is the girl mentally ill’ and ‘Do we need to call the police?’

“So I stopped jumping and apologized to them by saying, ‘I am taking jumping photos for my wedding party’s slide show.’ Their faces turned bright red, and they said things like ‘Oh dear!’ and ‘Congratulations!’ and even ‘Keep jumping!’

“Then, I took one of the best levitation shots of the entire series.

 


We are all surrounded by social stress as we are bound by the forces of earth’s gravity,” Natsumi says when asked why she took on the series. “So, I hope that people feel something like an instant release from their stressful days by seeing my levitation photos.”

Natsumi Hayashi’s website

Check out this link:

Artist Profile: Natsumi Hayashi’s levitating self-portraits