Artist Soo Kim cuts apart and reconstructs photographs of cityscapes until they become a whole new concrete jungle

Soo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet Prints

Beautiful Decay (by Christina Nafziger):

Artist Soo Kim severs, cuts, and reconstructs photographs until they become a more ethereal, delicate version of what they once were. Kim’s work portrays buildings fading away, and creates new geometric forms from different objects. Her cityscapes turn into beautiful framework of a concrete jungle after she slices them into their new form. They become a new, unique style of architecture and design that is created from layers of hand altered and manipulated photographs. Her highly architectural work examines these manmade forms in the midst of their environments. She often snips away at the manmade structures, but leaves the lush landscape in the background alone.

Often using photographs of scenes from different cities all over the world, these once extremely diverse places now are stripped down to their bones where they look somewhat similar. Soo Kim’s hand-cut structures unify these contrasting places, creating a balance of harmony. The incisions in her layered and cut two-dimensional work form a sense of volume, a three-dimensional element is added with her manipulation of foreground and background. Soo Kim’s art can often be more abstract, creating more vividly colored work with the same incredible cutting technique. Not always focused on architecture and manmade structures, the artist’s body of work also includes several ephemeral scenes of nature. With a light and airy palette, her tree branches droop, curve, and jut out of the composition in every direction, creating an amazing sense of depth.

Make sure to check out more of her work on Angles Gallery’s website, where she is represented.

Soo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet Prints

Soo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet Prints

Soo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet PrintsSoo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet PrintsSoo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet PrintsSoo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet PrintsSoo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet Prints

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Soo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet PrintsSoo Kim - Hand cut, Inkjet Prints

Taiwanese-French-American ballet dancer Mickael Jou’s breathtaking self-portraits

Mickael Jou is a unique self-portraitist. A Taiwanese-French-American living in Berlin, he takes self-portraits combining two arts: photography and dance.

A trained dancer, I used to perform ballet and modern dance in the streets of Paris. Tourists would quite often photograph and film me in action in Paris, and after seeing the pictures taken of me, I decided that I should try it out. Ad so I bought a camera and read the instruction manual. 

My self-portraits help me express the emotions that I feel while dancing. Dance is a very powerful art form, and I try to translate my emotions into my photography.

Mickael plans to take 365 dance self-portraits and has already been working on this project for more than 3 years.

More info: Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | mickaeljou.com

Photo source: mickaeljou.tumblr.com

Canon releases a video camera that goes to 4,000,000 ISO

Japanese photographic giant Canon has released a multi-purpose camera that goes all the way to 4,000,000 ISO. With an image sensor restricted to 2.26 megapixels, a price-tag of $30,000 USD and no internal storage, the camera is undoubtedly only to be used by specialists in very specific situations. Ideal for capturing full color in extreme low light, for nature photography or surveillance, the new ME20F-SH is explained in more detail in the video above.

Ballantine’s Scotch Whisky presents Benjamin Von Wong’s “Underwater River”

For the fifth installment of its “Stay True” collaborative series, following projects with graffiti artist INSA and DJ-producer Black Coffee, Ballantine’s Scotch Whisky partners with “hyper-real” photographer Benjamin Von Wong for a unique underwater experience. Floating 30 meters down in an ancient Mexican sinkhole is a cloud-like layer of hydrogen sulphide which separates salt and fresh water to create a unique visual phenomenon – an underwater river.

Inspired by this natural phenomena, along with a desire to celebrate his Chinese heritage, his beliefs and his deeply ingrained passion for experimentation, Benjamin set to work with Ballantine’s to create these seemingly impossible underwater images – a stunning, contemporary recreation of a fading ancient tradition, the Chinese Cormorant Fisherman.

After four months of intensive planning and research, across three continents, a special team comprised of some of the world’s most experienced divers, set builders, underwater filmmakers and even a record-breaking free-diver descended on the Mexican jungle for five days to undertake a challenge none of them had ever before contemplated.

Fujifilm unveils the X-T10 camera

HYPEBEAST Eats: Boomshack (Hong Kong)

Photographer captures Chinese families and their belongings over 11 Years