Calbee teams with gourmet French chain for uni and dried roe potato chip flavor

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RocketNews 24:

Calbee and the casual-gourmet French chain Ore no French will release an “Uni and Dried Roe Kyokujo Cream Saucepotato chip flavor on March 21.

The “Ore no” series of restaurants boasts a unique concept: By doing away with all the niceties of typical gourmet restaurants, such as spacious dining areas, unfailingly polite and classically trained servers, and chairs, the chain serves up gourmet meals devised or prepared by renowned chefs at just a fraction of the price you’d typically expect to pay.

It’s this exact dynamic of delicious and kind of crusty that sort of makes “Ore no French” — the company’s French fusion lineup of restaurants — and Calbee, the Japanese potato chip maker, a match made in heaven. And in fact, the two entities have just announced their third release in a collaborative potato chip series, this time introducing “Uni and Dried Roe Kyokujo Cream Sauce” potato chips due to hit shelves on March 21.

The flavor was specially conceived by the head chef of the Kagurazaka area location of Ore no French, Yousuke Yamazaki, and contains real powdered uni and mullet roe.

 

There’s a new line of Sriracha-infused snacks

KFC potato chips return to Japan this spring

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RocketNews 24:

Last year, something beautiful came to Japan. It was only here for a short while, but in that time, it left a deep impression on many people. And while we were sad to see it go, it’s time to dry our tears, because this spring, it’s coming back again!

So, all excited for cherry blossom season? That’s great, but what we’re actually talking about right here are Kentucky Fried Chicken-flavor potato chips.

Once again, Japanese snack company Calbee is teaming up with the world’s most famous fast food fried chicken outfit. Whereas last year’s version was billed as “Colonel’s Crispy-flavor,” this new batch of fried chicken-inspired fried potato slices emulates the taste of KFC Japan’s honenashi Kentucky paripari umashio, or Boneless Kentucky Crunchy Delicious Salt flavor.

We’re a little puzzled by the “Boneless” part of the product name, since we don’t recall any bone-like flavors in the KFC chips we tried last year. In more specific terms, Calbee says the chips draw out the natural deliciousness of chicken with a simple mixture of salt and pepper, so you can be assured that they make use of at least those two of Colonel Sanders’ 11 herbs and spices.

In a rarity for Japanese snack foods, Calbee is leaving pricing up to individual retailers. The larger, 83-gram bags are available exclusively at Japanese convenience storesstarting March 2. A smaller 58-gram bag will go on sale March 16, and both packages will include a coupon for a discount on an order of Boneless Kentucky Crunchy Delicious Salt chicken at KFC locations in Japan, in case munching on the chips has you craving the real deal.

5 amazing health and beauty benefits of eating wasabi

RocketNews 24:

Ah, wasabi, the pungent root that adds spice to sushi and gets up the noses of over-enthusiastic consumers, leaving many a watery eye and a burning palate. It seems that you either love wasabi or hate it, with wasabi-lovers clamoring for a touch of the green stuff in a variety of forms including Kit-Kats and potato chips, and wasabi-haters strictly stipulating to sushi chefs that they require their sushi sabi-nuki de, or sans wasabi. But did you know that the wasabi-lovers actually get to enjoy a host of health and beauty benefits that are denied to those who shy away from this miraculous wonder root? Read on as we unveil the five surprising health effects of regular wasabi consumption!

First, here’s a little info on wasabi itself. Wasabi is a member of the brassicacae family of plants, which includes mustard and horseradish. The uninitiated might refer to wasabi as “Japanese horseradish” but real wasabi is actually completely different.The confusion probably stems from the fact that most wasabi you can buy in a tube is actually a mixture of mustard, horseradish and food coloring, as real wasabi paste quickly loses flavor within about 15 minutes and is therefore less suitable for sale. Proper wasabi can be served grated or powdered as well as in paste form. If you’ve ever actually eaten too much wasabi, you’ll know that its “hotness” tends to manifest as a sharp, stinging nasal pain which quickly dissipates after a few seconds of eye-streaming agony. Sure, the tang of wasabi is a bit too much for some, but here’s why we should all be loading up our sushi with more of this amazing condiment.

 

Reason 1: Wasabi prevents food poisoning

Did you ever wonder why wasabi traditionally tends to be eaten with sushi? It’s not just because the spiciness of the wasabi perfectly complements the mild flavors of rice and raw fish. Wasabi contains allyl isothiocyanate, a potent insecticide and bacteriocide which helps to combat potential food bugs (although if your sushi is fresh, you probably don’t have to worry too much about this). Wasabi also helps prevent food poisoning by neutralizing and killing any mold spores that are present. Experts recommend including a touch of wasabi in your daily bento box in order to keep your lunch free from any nasties.

▼ Load up on wasabi whenever you’re eating sushi to help minimize your risk of an upset stomach later! The accompanying shoga ginger also has anti-bacterial properties, and a bowl of miso soup at the end of the meal will help to keep your tummy happy.

 

Reason 2: Wasabi keeps you young

Sulfinyl, a compound released when fresh wasabi is grated, is a powerful anti-oxidant. Regular consumption of sulfinyl could help to reverse early ageing, as it lowers reactive oxygen in the body. As well as helping to fight cancer, this also contributes to a lessening of the general wear and tear of the body as a result of the natural ageing process.

▼ How about incorporating some wasabi toothpaste into your morning routine in order to stave off the ravages of age?

 

Reason 3: Wasabi could help to prevent certain cancers

As well as keeping you young, wasabi could also reduce your risk of cancer. The compound 6-MSITC has anti-inflammatory properties which also provide host defence against cancer cells.

 ▼ Pass the wasabi sauce!

 

Reason 4: Wasabi is great for your circulation

As well as fighting cancer, that 6-MSITC that we mentioned also works to inhibit platelet aggregation, the clumping together of platelets into blood clots. In other words, it prevents blood clots forming and effectively reduces your risk of heart attack and strokes. The beneficial circulatory effects are also praised for helping to maintain cardiovascular health overall, as well as keeping the skin clear.

▼ Skip the beauty supplements and reach for the wasabi pills! Or just, you know, eat some regular wasabi.

 

Reason 5: Wasabi fights colds and allergies

Swallowing a big ol’ lump of wasabi is one sure-fire way to clear out blocked sinuses from a cold, flu or allergies. The gaseous release of the allyl isothiocyanate that helps to fight bacteria also works its magic on cold and flu-causing pathogens which attack the respiratory tract. Next time you’re facing the sniffles, maybe try going out for sushi !

▼You could also chow down on a big pile of wasabi Kit-Kats, but they probably won’t help with your cold, no matter how much you sniff ‘em.

So, there you have it! The five top health benefits of eating delicious wasabi. Note: be careful if you’re taking any medicines that are metabolized by the liver, as too much wasabi can interact with such medicines in unpredictable ways. Around a teaspoon a day of wasabi should do the trick – or a few handfuls of wasabi-based snacks…

South Korean students combat the tyranny of “mostly-air” potato chip bags by tying a bunch together and floating down a river

 

FoodBeast:

Students in South Korea are combatting the tyranny of “mostly-air” potato chip bags by tying a bunch together and floating down a 574 foot wide river. Sounds like an excellent plan.

Earlier this week, the students Sung Taek Chang, Sungo Ho Yoo, and Hyun Soo Park posted a video of themselves testing a prototype floatie made from 30 or so chip bags supporting one of the boy’s weights in an unidentified shallow body of water. Their proposed two-person raft will be made of 180 bags and be used on a river that stretches 300 miles and reaches up to half a mile wide in some areas.

According to Kotaku, the boys plan to set out on their expedition as early as tomorrow.

For those who aren’t already aware, the air in potato chip bags is meant to prevent the chips from breaking and crumbling in transit, though this is an amusing way to gripe about the lack of actual chips. Maybe instead of “air,” chip companies can start filing their bags with helium. Potato chip bag-UP house, anyone?

 

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Sriracha-Pringles Now Available at Walmart

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Foodbeast:

Just when you thought the hubbub was over, Pringles has to go and jump on the bandwagon, albeit a little late to the game. Spotted by Impulsive Buy reader Dustin, the new Sriracha-flavored Pringles are only available at Walmart. According to the ingredients rundown, the new item gets its kick from a hot sauce blend of red peppers, vinegar, salt and garlic.

Still, let’s go back to the fact that they’re just rolling out with their own Sriracha-friendly product. We suppose those Pecan Pie Pringles must have taken priority last year. Or maybe it was those White Chocolate Peppermint and Pumpkin Spice chips you tried to convince everyone on? Either way, it’s nice that Pringles finally decided to join the party.

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Sriracha-Pringles Now Available at Walmart

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“Sushi” is one of candidates currently in the running for Lay’s next flavor

Huffington Post: 

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Last year Cheesy Garlic Bread was the winner of Lay’s “Do Us a Flavor” U.S. contest, while syrup-soaked Maple Moose won in Canada. Now, Lay’s is once again calling upon America to submit their own fan-made flavors for the chance to win $1 million dollars and see their creation hit shelves.

This year, Lays ups the ante by letting contestants suggest flavors for three different potato chip varieties including Original, Kettle Cooked and Wavy. Four finalists, as opposed to last year’s three, will be chosen to compete for first place, and fans can participate now through April 5, 2014. So far, the submissions have included everything from Sushi-flavored chips to Corned Beef Hash.

Peek some of the best and worst of the lot below:

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This article by Charisma Madarang originally appeared on Foodbeast.com

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