Gaijin Tips: “Eat all your rice in Japan”

Check out this Gaijin Tip from video/blogger kanadajin3, who is actually named Mira and is “a girl who moved from Toronto, Canada to Tokyo, Japan.”

Eat all your rice in Japan. Leaving food behind is rude esp if it is rice bits. When you scrape food off your rice cooker, you need to take everything, leaving little bits is ruder than leaving a lot. If you just can’t finish your food that you got at a restaurant then you can leave some behind, but try to finish everything at home and at your friends house.

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A University of Sri Lanka professor and student devise simple method to cut the calories in rice by 50%

rice
Next Shark/Food Beast:

Rice, an important staple food in many countries, is valuable because, one, it is cheap, and two, it’s high in calories because it’s a starch. So why would we ever need a way to cook low-calorie rice?

The method in question stems from an article by the Washington Post. The story presents a method of cooking rice which addresses the problem of white rice consumption being linked to a higher risk of diabetes. A University of Sri Lanka professor and an undergraduate student devised an “ingenious method” to cut the calories in rice (200 calories per cup, cooked) by 50% as well as add a few “health benefits” — it’s also very easy to do. The student, Sudhair James, explained his preliminary research at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Monday:

What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil—about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you’re going to cook … after it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator for about 12 hours. That’s it.

“The oil interacts with the starch in rice and changes its architecture … Chilling the rice then helps foster the conversion of starches. The result is a healthier serving, even when you heat it back up.”

Why do you need low-cal rice? Because people in developing countries, e.g. China and India, are suffering from obesity. It’s not just rice that causes the obesity, but people do rely more heavily on cheaper foods.

Pushparajah Thavarajva, the professor who led the research, explained that obesity, while also a problem in the U.S., is becoming a problem in Asia because people are eating larger portions of rice. The calorie-cutting research is still ongoing with several methods yet to be tested, but rice is also just the first of many foods Thavarajva hopes to make healthier.

It’s about more than rice … I mean, can we do the same thing for bread? That’s the real question here.”

On Reddit, some believe the concept of low-calorie rice is useless. Smarter people think it’s very necessary, it’s very simple and it may become the new way of cooking rice.

10 distinctly Japanese comfort foods

RocketNews 24:

Comfort food” is traditional cooking that tends to have a nostalgic or sentimental connection, often one related to family or childhood: the grilled cheese sandwiches your mother used to make; the thought of your grandmother’s bread pudding makes your mouth water; the way the whole house would be filled with the intoxicating aroma of roasted turkey or ham at Christmas? Because of such memories, these foods comfort us, especially when we’re longing for home or feeling especially vulnerable.

Not surprisingly, the sentimental Japanese have their own comfort foods. While you might think they’d be waxing over the octopus tentacles of home, very few of the dishes we’re about to talk about have much to do with seafood. Many Japanese comfort foods have a rice connection and may even center around the unique relationship between mothers or wives and their role in family food preparation. And in Japan, make no mistake about it–her kitchen rules!

Here are 10 distinctly Japanese comfort foods:

1. Miso soup and rice (味噌汁とご飯)

miso soup

Miso soup and its companion bowl of rice are sometimes described as a “marriage.” This is the food Japanese miss most when they leave home to live on their own for the first time or if they travel abroad and tire of “Western breakfast.”

Miso soup is hardly ever served without its faithful rice. For centuries this edible couple has been considered the main part of a classic, healthy Japanese breakfast. “Mom’s miso soup” is, quite simply, to die for. And each Mom adds her own touch to the recipe, so the subtle flavors vary according to household. So powerful is this aromatic duo that the mere thought of smelling miso upon waking up in the morning can leave a study-abroad student salivating as he or she is transported temporarily back to the mother ship.

Other than the miso base, other ingredients in the soup may include dashi broth, tofu, chopped green onion, wakame seaweed and a plethora of others. See some miso soup anime ads that bring out the true miso spirit.

Try making it! Learn how to make miso soup in the Rocket Kitchen. No miso? No problem–miso can be made at home too!

 

2. Onigiri (おにぎり)

onigiri

While women’s hands are said to be too warm to become sushi chefs, those ostensibly hot hands surely come in handy when it comes to making rice balls. This favorite snack, made from either fresh steamed rice or leftover rice from the night before, is standard fare for bento lunches and picnics. All good outdoor gatherings feature the highly portable and nutritious triangular-shaped sticky rice ball, which is geometrically formed by squeezing it just so in the palms of the hands. Each ball is filled with one of a number of ingredients from sweet salmon to sour plums, and the triangle of rice is girthed with a seaweed belt so moist, it doesn’t actually stick to your lips like the papery convenience-store kind.

According to Japanese aesthetics, any food tastes better with proper scenery, so you’ll find rice balls at every “Hanami” cherry blossom party.

 

3. Tempura (天ぷら)

Tempura

This favorite food of foreigners is also a favorite of the Japanese (even though tempura is thought to have originally come from Portugal). Surely, worldwide, everyone loves tempura! And mama’s home made has gotta be the best. But I can’t help think that the nostalgia surrounding this food (the taste of which doesn’t vary that much from kitchen to kitchen) has to do with the method of preparation: the wife dutifully stays in the kitchen throughout the meal, only emerging occasionally when the next batch of piping hot veggies are ready to be served to her expectant family. And of course a Japanese wife is happy, perhaps even ecstatic, to do this, in order to fulfill the expectations of the perfect mother who, at least in the old days, was said to “make and serves food with all her heart” (kokorokomete ryoriotsukurimasu).

Tip! Be sure to have fun with your tempura–make it colossal!

 

4. Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き)

okonomiyaki

A close runner up as an all-time favorite by foreigners and Japanese alike is oknomiyaki (literally “grilled as you like it”). What could be more fun than playing with your food? Mix up the cabbage with a combination of okonomiyaki flour and milk, add a raw egg, then ingredients such as mochi, cheese, fish, pork, or corn (anything really–as you like it!). Leave it on the grill to cook then top it with sweet okonomiyaki sauce!

Whether Hiroshima style or Osaka style, oknonomiyaki satisfies even the most unsophisticated pallets. It’s what I serve to my parents who don’t like Japanese food (surely the only two people left in the world). This pancake-like food is certainly interactive and gets everyone communing at the table.

Not only that, but such comfort foods pull at the heartstrings of boys when they become myopic, nostalgic adults missing their mommies. In Japan, the relationship between mothers and sons is supposed to be extra special (sorry girls!).

Watch it! A video of one man’s gourmet food trip through Japan, including oknomiyaki.

 

5. Tamago Kake Gohan (卵かけ御飯)

TKG

This simple dish is so fast, so simple, and so good! Just a raw egg, a little soy sauce (if you like) and some cooked white rice will give you a meal on the go. One of our RocketNews24 writers who grew up eating TKG, says it’s her go-to comfort food. Just pour the raw egg yolk over the rice and mix it together: ta-da! Isn’t that convenient?! Who said you couldn’t cook Japanese food?

Make it! Try Rocket Kitchen’s Ultimate TKG

6. Nabe (鍋)

nabe

Nabe is one of those foods in the “cooked in large earthenware pot” family. It is stewed in a vessel that sits in the middle of the table. Meat and vegetables are added throughout the entire dinner session, with each person around the dinner table reaching into the pot with their chopsticks to pick out their own vegetables or meats (or perhaps dished out by mom) as the ingredients slowly cook. This dish is only shared with family or good friends who you’re absolutely sure don’t have any contagious diseases. The constant dipping of your chopsticks into the broth to dig out mighty morsels means that you’ll be sharing your germs. On the other hand, you can console yourself that the boiling broth may kill most of the cooties someone might unknowingly be passing on. Nabe, a winter food, is usually associated with close friends and family, the equivalent of sitting around a bonfire with a guitar and singing songs together. Being invited to a nabe party is a definitive indication you’ve been accepted into the inner circle. Try yosenabe–or “fling it all in” nabe!

Make it cute! Tips on how to make your nabe look as kawaii as possible!

 

7. Okayu (おかゆ)

okayu

When Japanese feel a cold coming on, they reach for okayu–a warm, easily digestible watery mush made from rice. It’s also the food of choice if you’re missing your teeth. Even Kiki, the heroine of the anime film Kiki’s Delivery Service, can be seen eating okayu in a scene when she is sick. So next time you’re feeling a bit under the weather, do what Kiki does and try some rice porridge!

Make it! Ghibli-inspired rice porridge

8. Udon (うどん)

udon

While both ramen and udon noodles are loved by the Japanese, I’m going to stick to Udon here because, well, it’s Japanese (whereas ramen in technically Chinese) and udon is the Wall Street Journal of noodles–it’s way more sophisticated than ramen. Ramen’s reputation is that of an easy, greasy food eaten when you’re in need of something filling and moreish but not especially good for you–often after a night out drinking. But while ramen satisfies, udon nurtures. The warmth of steam emanating from a large bowl of udon, and enveloping your face in the wintertime is enough to warm you to your toes. It’s no wonder that in Kagawa Prefecture, the udon capital of Japan, and where they are known to eat udon while in the bath, that they’re using the long unleavened egg dough to generate power. How cool is that?!

9. Curry Rice (カレーライス)

katsu curry

Curry rice doesn’t sound like it’s Japanese, and surely its origins aren’t (Japanese curry comes from India by way of the British navy, would you believe), but the way the Japanese have modified their knock-off version is distinctly their own. It’s sweet, gooey and heaped over sticky rice! And it’s usually not spicy at all. Kids and adults alike love this cheap, easy-to-prepare food, usually made from boxed curry you buy at the store. And anything can be added to it including meat and veggies. For me, I prefer the real thing, but the fact is that Japanese kids grow up eating and loving the Japanese version. Curry rice is served in school lunches, at ski resorts, on the beach, and at restaurants everywhere. It’s ubiquitous, which means it’s a fallback food anywhere, anytime. Except abroad, where you’ll rarely, if ever, find it.

Tip! Twelve meals to make using leftover curry

10. Ochazuke (お茶漬け)

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We saved ochazuke for last because this dish is consumed at the very end of a meal. Ochazuke is most likely only encountered by foreigners who dine with Japanese, so may not be well-known to mere tourists. But most foreigners’ first encounter is similar: You’re at the end of a meal, feeling like a total pig because you’ve eaten so much amazing food. You’re sitting back in your chair, hands folded over the swollen stomach, thinking you couldn’t eat another bite of anything even if it were apple pie, when suddenly, someone at the table pipes up, “Let’s have ochazuke!” They tackle the waiter who dutifully takes away one thing from the table: the leftover rice. This is taken back to the kitchen, where the chef mixes it with green tea (and perhaps some other things). The rice concoction is brought back out to the table and presented as the last course, like a sort of savoury dessert. It’s warm, it’s delicious, and you somehow find a little extra room in your distended stomach for it before completely passing out.

Tip! Just combine green tea and rice.

 

Study shows that South Koreans consume more coffee than white rice

kfood consumption

 Audrey Magazine:

South Koreans now drink more coffee than they eat their staple food rice, according to a survey conducted by the Korea Centers for Disease Control of 3,805 adults, according to The Chosun Ilbo.

According to the 2013 survey, the average Korean drinks coffee 12.3 times per week, followed by eating kimchi 11.8 times, multigrain rice 9.5 times, and white rice seven times per week.

The proportion of rice in Koreans’ daily diet has steadily declined over the past decade whereas coffee-related calorie intake has quadrupled due to the amount of artificial sweeteners in coffee, reported The Korea Herald.

Over the past few years, coffee culture has been going strong in South Korea. Earlier this year, Seoul was named as the city with the most Starbucks locations, beating New York City and Los Angeles. In addition, it was reported last month that Starbucks in Korea costs twice as much as it does in the U.S.

Link

The Rice Cube — tasty-looking appetizers made fun and easy !!!

 

RocketNews 24:

 

Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 11.14.29 AM

 

Let’s face it, being a responsible adult can be a challenge. You’re expected to show up at work each day looking decent (thank god for make-up), somehow keep your home always looking half-way presentable and even be able to whip up stylish looking snacks and appetizers in no time at all when you’re having friends over, right?

Well, if you’re having particular difficulty with that last bit, and you’re tired of serving the same old chips and dip at get-togethers, then this little gadget that the wonderful reporters at our sister site Pouch recently found just may be a godsend. That’s right, folks, it’s the Rice Cube to the rescue!

Yes, this contraption could indeed be exactly what you need if you want to surprise your family or friends with a fabulously unique snack or starter. Available from the UK site Firebox, the Rice Cube lets you make adorable little square sushi. And it’s apparently quite simple too. All you have to do is put in the rice and whatever other ingredients you like and compress to squeeze everything together into a cube, so it doesn’t require any special skills.

The best part is that the Rice Cube, despite its name, can be used with many different ingredients other than rice, such as cheese or potatoes  to create a wide range of snacks and even desserts. This means that  you can be quite creative with the appearance and color of the resulting cubes and  feel like you’re making food art in the process — your culinary imagination is basically the limit. We’re quite sure it can also be a whole lot of fun for kids as well.

 

▼ You can create cubes of flavored sautéed rice or different kinds of mixed rice and place small pieces of boiled eggs or avocados to make them look colorful and stylish.

Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 11.14.48 AM

 

▼ You can use ingredients with different colors and textures to create a cube that looks pretty from the side too.Screen Shot 2014-04-22 at 11.15.01 AM

 

The Rice Cube is priced at £9.99 (US$17), and Firebox apparently offers international shipping, so if you need something fun to liven up the food offering at your next party, then you may want to check the site out. We hope you enjoy creating, looking at and tasting your own unique edible cubes!

 

Check out this link:

The Rice Cube — tasty-looking appetizers made fun and easy!

Link

50 Filipino foods that define the Philippines

CNN Travel: 

AdoboAdobo — common, but not ordinary Filipino food.

1. Adobo

No list of Filipino food would be complete without adobo.

A ubiquitous dish in every household in the Philippines, it’s Mexican in origin, but Filipinos found that cooking meat (often chicken and pork) in vinegar, salt, garlic, pepper, soy sauce and other spices, was a practical way to preserve meat without refrigeration.

This cooking style can be applied to different meats or even seafood. Sample it in a Filipino home or the garlicky version of the lamb adobo at Abe.

Abe, Serendra Plaza, Fort Bonifacio Global City, Taguig; +63 2 856 0526; www.ljcrestaurants.com.ph

 

 

LechonLechon — this little pig went to our stomachs.

2. Lechon

The lechon is the most invited party guest in the Philippines. The entire pig is spit-roasted over coals, with the crisp, golden-brown skin served with liver sauce, the most coveted part.

In Cebu, the stomach of the pig is stuffed with star anise, pepper, spring onions, laurel leaves and lemongrass resulting in an extremely tasty lechon, which needs no sauce.

In Manila, get your piggy from Elar’s Lechon, while in Cebu, the best is CnT Lechon.

Elar’s Lechon, 151 Quezon Ave., corner Speaker Perez Street, Sta. Mesa Heights, Quezon City, Metro Manila; +632 731 7551. CnT Lechon, 1377 Rama Ave., Guadalupe, Cebu City; +63 3 2254 4249

 

SisigSisig — no pig parts ever go to waste.

3. Sisig

Nothing goes to waste in Filipino food. In the culinary capital of Pampanga, they turn the pork’s cheeks, head and liver into a sizzling dish called Sisig.

The crunchy and chewy texture of this appetizer is a perfect match for an cold beer. Serve with hot sauce and Knorr seasoning to suit the preference of you and your buddies.

Credit goes to Aling Lucing who invented this dish at a humble stall along the train railways in Angeles City, Pampanga. While Sisig can be found in many restaurants, try the original version at Aling Lucing Sisig.

Aling Lucing Sisig, Valdez StcorAgapito Del Rosario Street, AngelesCity, Pampanga; +63 4 5888 2317

 

 

Crispy pataCrispy pata — crunchy, juicy, chewy; a tasty trinity of Filipino food.

4. Crispy pata

Not for the easily spooked, this pork knuckle is simmered, drained and deep fried until crisp. The meat is tender and juicy inside, with a crisp, crackling exterior.

Served with vinegar, soy sauce and chili. If you have a craving for this at any time, Aristocrat is open 24 hours.

Aristocrat, 432 San Andres St., corner Roxas Blvd., Malate Manila; + 63 2 524 7671; www.aristocrat.com.ph

 

Chicken InasalChicken inasal — you’ll never go back to Nando’s.

5. Chicken inasal

Yes, it’s grilled chicken. But in Bacolod, this is no ordinary grilled chicken.

The meat is marinated in lemongrass, calamansi, salt, pepper and garlic and brushed with achuete (annatto seeds) oil.

Every part of the chicken is grilled here from the paa (drumstick), pecho (breast), baticulon (gizzard), atay (liver), pakpak (wings) and corazon (heart). It must be eaten with a generous serving of garlic rice, with some of the orange oil used to marinade the chicken poured over the rice.

Go chicken crazy at Manukan Country where there is a row of authentic Inasal restaurants.

Manukan Country, Reclamation Area, Bacolod City

 

Taba ng TalangkaTaba ng talangka — crab fat; a rarity if ever there was one.

6. Taba ng talangka

The fat of a small variety of crabs are pressed and sautéed in garlic. This cholesterol-laden Filipino food is often used as a sauce for prawns or eaten with fried fish and rice.

The best taba ng talangka comes from the provinces of Pampanga, Tarlac and Bulacan. Buy a bottle or two from the markets there, or pasalubong shops like Bulacan Sweets.

Bulacan Sweets, 155 N.S. Amoranto Ave., Quezon City, Metro Manila; +63 2 740 2171

 

7. Pancit Palabok

When Filipinos have guests, they don’t skimp. The pancit palabok served on most birthday parties is oozing with flavor and textures.

The noodle dish is layered with rice noodles, a rich orange sauce made from shrimp broth, pork, hard boiled eggs, shrimps, chicharon (pork rinds) and sometimes oysters and squid. Enjoy the rich sauce of Perfect Loaf Bakery and Café.

Perfect Loaf Bakery and Café, Teresa Ave. corner St. Joseph Street, Nepo Mart Complex, Angeles City, Pampanga; +63 4 5888 6629

 

 

BulaloBulalo — the more marrow the merrier.

8. Bulalo

Despite the perennial heat, Filipinos often enjoy sipping piping hot bulalo soup made with from freshly slaughtered Batangas beef.

The broth is rich with flavors seeped from the beef after boiling for hours. The bones are big, meaning more bone marrow to enjoy.

In Santo Tomas, Batangas, there’s a row of restaurants along the highway serving bulalo. But the best one stands out further away in nearby Tagaytay city, called Diner Café.

Diner Cafém Tagaytay-Batangas Highway, Tagaytay City; +63 4 6413 1845

 

Arroz CaldoArroz caldo — cold cure, Pinoy style.

9. Arroz Caldo

While chicken soup soothes sick Westerners, Filipinos turn to arroz caldo, a thick chicken rice porridge.

Cooked with ginger and sometimes garnished with a hard-boiled egg, toasted garlic and green onions, this Filipino food is sold in street-side stalls.

If dining al fresco doesn’t suit you, try it at the Via Mare outlets around Manila.

www.viamare.com.ph

 

10. Fish tinola

The freshness of Cebu’s rich marine life can be tasted in its fish tinola, a simple sour broth flavored with onions, tomatoes and sambag (tamarind) and cooked over coco-lumber firewood for hours.

Cebuanos know to go to A-One, a small hole in the wall known, cooking up to 200 kilos of fish daily.

A-One, Rd. North 6, North Reclamation, Cebu City

 

 

Kare KareKare-kare — the proof is in the texture.

11. Kare-kare

This stew of oxtail has the most delicious sauce made from ground toasted rice and crushed peanuts. Banana blossom, eggplants and string beans add more interesting textures, to make it a complete meal on its own.

It’s eaten with steamed rice and bagoong (shrimp paste). While mom’s kare-kare is always best, the version at Café Juanita is authentic.

Café Juanita, 19 West Capitol Drive, Barrio Capitolyo; +63 2 632 0357

 

kamaroKamaro — get over the appearance and a succulent bite awaits.

12. Kamaro

Serious gourmands know the best cooks come from Pampanga. So do kamaro, these mole crickets they cook into a delicious appetizer.

What makes this delicacy special? Well if catching these bugs is tough, so is cooking them. Legs and wings must be removed, then the body is boiled in vinegar and garlic. It’s then sautéed in oil, onion and chopped tomatoes until chocolate brown.

These bite-size appetizers are crunchy on the outside and moist on the inside. Sample Kamaru at Everybody’s Café, an authentic Pampango dining institution for many decades now.

Everybody’s Café, Del Pilar, MacArthur Highway, San Fernando, Pampanga; +63 4 5860 1121

 

 

13. Ilocos empanada

Yes, its name reveals its Spanish origins. But its ingredients are all local.

Grated unripe papaya or bean sprouts, egg and loganiza (pork sausage) are stuffed in the empanada and deep fried, accompanied with a spicy vinegar sauce.

Get this staple Filipino food from stalls beside the cathedrals in Vigan and Laoag.

 

 

Sinigang — as tasty as it is cute.

14. Sinigang

Sinigang is a stew of fish, prawns, pork or beef soured by fruits like tamarind, kamias or tomatoes.  Often accompanied by vegetables like kangkong, string beans and taro, this stew is eaten with rice.

A modern, but delicious spin on Sinigang is Sentro 1771’s version called Sinigang Corned Beef.

Sentro 1771’s,  Greenbelt 3, Paseo de Roxas cor. Legaspi Street, Ayala Center Makati, Metro Manila; +63 2 757 3940

 

TapaTapa — an easy way to make rice interesting.

15. Tapa

Filipinos are huge rice eaters, and breakfast is no exception.

A tap-si-log consists of thin slices of dried marinated beef served with fried egg and garlic rice.

While it is breakfast fare, it’s also a quick, satisfying meal you can eat anytime and available in most places. Making it accessible all the time and even available for deliveries, Tapa King serves it in the classic, sweetish and spicy versions.

www.tapaking.com.ph

 

Dinuguan at PutoDinuguan at puto — the best pork innards ever looked.

16. Dinuguan at puto

While it may not look appetizing, this black dish of pork and pig innards stewed in fresh pig blood seasoned with garlic, onion and oregano and eaten with a white puto (rice cake) or steamed rice, is a comforting dish for many Filipinos.

Café Milky Way’s version tastes homemade and clean.

Café Milky Way, 2/F 900 A. Arnaiz Ave. Cor Paseo de Roxas, Makati; +63 2 843 4124

 

17. Betute

The French may have turned frogs’ legs into a delicacy, but Filipinos take it to the next level. They get a frog, stuff it with minced pork and deep-fry it.

While betute isn’t for everyone, the adventurous can try it at Everybody’s Cafe, an authentic Pampango dining institution for many decades now.

Del Pilar, MacArthur Highway, San Fernando, Pampanga, +63 4 5 8601 121

 

 

LaingLaing — yes it’s slop, but damn tasty slop.

18. Laing

This dish of taro leaves cooked in rich coconut milk is an everyday staple in Bicol. Morsels of meat and chili are added to give punch to the Laing.

It’s eaten with steamed rice. The authentic versions from kitchens in Naga and Albay are most delicious. In Manila, try it at Dencio’s.

www.dencio.biz

 

PinakbetPinakbet — simple, cheap and healthy; no wonder it’s spread around the country.

19. Pinakbet

Up north in Ilocos, the vegetable dish of okra, eggplant, bitter gourd, squash, tomatoes and bagoong (shrimp or fish paste) called pinakbet is a favorite.

And now, this healthy, cheap, and easy to cook dish has made its way around the archipelago. It is cooked in most households and local restaurants.

Try it at Max’s Fried Chicken, Manila.

www.maxschicken.com

 

20. Sinugno

Cooking with coconut milk is common in the province of Quezon, south of Manila. Freshwater tilapia fish is grilled then simmered in coconut milk and chili.

It’s definitely freshest when eaten close to the fishponds as they do in Kamayan Sa Palaisdaan.

Brgy. Dapdap Tayabas Quezon; +63 4 2793 3654

 

 

BagnetBagnet — a crunchy, vinegary addiction beckons.

21. Bagnet

While the lechon kawali, the deep fried pork, is a popular Filipino food all over the country, bagnet, from the northern province of Ilocos, is coveted for its irresistible crunchy skin dipped in the sweet-sour vinegar sukang Iloko.

Buy it from the markets of Ilocos, or try it at Café Juanita.

Café Juanita, 19 West Capitol Drive, Barrio Capitolyo; +63 2 632 0357

 

Pancit HabhabPancit habhab — fast-food for the Philippines.

22. Pancit habhab

Trust Filipino ingenuity to adapt noodles to their lifestyle. In Lucban, Quezon, pancit habhab is served on a banana leaf and slurped. Garnished with carrots, chayote, and a few pieces of meat, this cheap noodle dish is most often eaten by students and jeepney drivers on the go.

For an extra special version, try Old Center Panciteria  who has been making the noodles since 1937. They add lechon, generous serving of vegetables, and even hand you a fork.

Old Center Panciteria, 85 San Luis St. Lucban, Quezon; +63 42 540 3068

 

23. Pork barbecue

In a country where almost everything is marinated, skewered and grilled in the street corners, everyone has their favorite barbecue meat. Pork is the most popular.

Cebu is known for barbecue stalls along Larsian Street just off Fuente Osmena Circle.

Manila residents are addicted to that from Ineng’s, which has many outlets in Metro Manila, for its big, chunky pieces of pork with a perfect, salty-sweet marinade.

Dela Rosa Car Park, Dela Rosa Street, Legaspi Village, Makati City, Metro Manila

 

 

LonganizaLonganiza — bursting with flavors, sometimes literally.

24. Longaniza

Every province has their version of the pork sausage called longaniza. It varies from sweet to garlicky to spicy.

Usually eaten for breakfast with garlic rice, fried egg and a dipping sauce of vinegar.

Zoricho, 118 Silver City, Frontera Verde, Ugong, Pasig City, Metro Manila; +63 2 571 3269

 

Lumpiang UbodLumpiang ubod — spring rolls with a coconut-y twist.

25. Lumpiang ubod

The fruit, leaves and even the pith of the coconut tree is used in Filipino food. The pith makes a sweet and tender filling for the fresh lumpia, our version of the spring roll.

A delicate egg wrapper contains a savory filling of ubod (the pith of the coconut tree), shrimps, pork, onions and a garlicky sweet sauce.

Bacolod city is known for its petite version of this spring roll.

El Ideal Bakery, 118 Rizal St., Silay City, Negros Occidental; +63 34 495 4430 and Bailon Homemade Ilonggo Delicacies, 1115 Rodriguez Ave., Bangkal, Makati; +63 2 843 6673

 

Bicol ExpressBicol express — uniting coconut and chili lovers.

26. Bicol express

A fitting tribute to people who love coconut and spicy food is bicol express, a fiery chili, pork and coconut milk stew. Try it at the hole-in-the-wall eatery called Top Haus in Makati.

Top Haus, 5994 J.D. Villena St., corner Mabini Street, Poblacion, Makati

 

27. Relyenong alimango

Filipino cooks are never fazed by fuzzy food preparations like relyenong alimango. The crab is delicately peeled then sautéed with onions, tomatoes, herbs and stuffed back into the crab shell, then deep fried.

Chicken or bangus (milkfish) are also cooked relyeno. Often cooked in homes for fiestas, but enterprising housewives sell them at the Sunday market in Quezon City (Centris Mall, Edsa, Quezon City) or the Saturday market in Makati (Salcedo Village, Makati)

 

BalutBalut — just think of it as being overripe.

28. Balut

No trip to the Philippines would be complete without sampling its famous balut. Vendors peddling these eggs on the street chant “Baluuuuut!” to entice buyers.

This 17-day-old duck embryo is boiled, served with rock salt or spicy vinegar and is often consumed with beer.

 

29. Inihaw na panga ng tuna

General Santos and Davao City are known for their numerous ways with tuna. The panga or jaw is often grilled over coals and dipped in sauce of soy sauce, vinegar, chili and calamansi (local lemon).

Marina Tuna Seafood Market & Restaurant, Kilometer 8, National Highway, Bo. Pampanga, Sasa, Davao City; +63 8 2233 2666

 

Fish KinilawFish kinilaw — various forms, one great taste.

30. Fish kinilaw

The day’s fresh catch is dressed in palm coconut vinegar, ginger, chili and spices. Each province has its own way of preparing kinilaw.

Most wet markets will prepare this for you. Most popular in Cebu is to eat it in Su-tu-kil, the row of seafood eateries (Lapu-LapuCity, Mactan,Cebu).

 

Kuhol sa GataKuhol sa gata — what the French can do …

31. Kuhol sa gata

Fresh snails cooked in coconut milk and leafy vegetables. The snails are served in the shell and a tiny fork (or toothpick) is used to loosen the meat inside.

This is usually served as an appetizer or a snack, but it works well with hot rice.

Try it at Barrio Fiesta Greenhills

 

SinanglaySinanglay — when food looks this good it’s almost a shame to eat it.

32. Sinanglay

Fresh tilapia stuffed with tomatoes and onions, then simmered in coconut milk and wrapped in pechay leaves (similar to bokchoy), which helps keep the fish together and adds a peppery taste. It’s a staple Filipino food.

Try it at Adarna Food and Culture

 

Inihaw na LiempoInihaw na liempo — the delicious crunch-soft combo strikes again.

33. Inihaw na Liempo

A Filipino-style barbecue using a popular pork part: liempo (pork belly). Arguably, the best is Cebuano style — a slab of liempo stuffed with herbs and spices and roasted, resulting in juicy flavorsome meat inside and crackling skin outside.

 

34. Empanada de kaliskis

The literal translation of these words is scaly pie. A traditional meat pie from Malolos, it is a flaky, croissant-like pastry filled with chicken and deep fried.

Best freshly made, get it when in Malolos or from a reputable restaurant such as Adarna Food and Culture.

 

TugacTinolang tugac — hopping into your fave dish list.

35. Tinolang tugac

Frog isn’t common in Manila, but a few miles away in Pampanga you’ll see it stuffed or stewed.

Or simply taking the place of chicken, such as in the common tinola — a ginger-based soup usually cooked with chunks of green papaya and chili pepper leaves.

 

Camaro RebosadoCamaro rebosado — juxtaposing flavor and texture.

36. Camaro rebosado

Shrimp coated in egg and flour batter and deep fried.

Served with a tomato-based sweet and sour sauce for dipping.

 

BibingkaBibingka — the smell of a Filipino Christmas.

37. Bibingka

For many Filipinos, Christmas is marked by the scent of bibingkas cooking at dawn. These rice cakes are made by soaking the rice overnight, grinding it with a mortar stone and mixing in coconut milk and sugar. Laborious.

The batter is poured into clay pots with banana leaves, with coals on top and below. It’s garnished with salted eggs, kesong puti (white cheese made from Carabao’s milk) and slathered with butter, sugar and grated coconut.

Best eaten hot from weekend markets. The best one is from Aling Linda at the Sidcor Sunday Market at Centris Mall, Edsa,Quezon City. For the rest of the week, try Via Mare or Ferino’s Bibingka with branches all over Metro Manila. www.viamare.com.ph

 

Suman at MangaSuman at manga — can’t go wrong with sweet, juicy mango.

38. Suman at manga

Sold along the roadside, suman are sticky rice snacks steamed in banana or coconut leaves. There are many versions of suman, depending on the ingredients and leaves used.

These Filipino food snacks are often paired with sweet ripe mangoes. They’re cheap snacks, which travel well.

Buy them from roadside stalls, or enterprising vendors peddling them on buses.

 

ChamporadoChamporado — essentially a bowl of hot, soggy Coco Pops.

39. Champorado

When the rains start pouring and classes are suspended, children love this comforting breakfast — a chocolate rice porridge. It’s hot, rich and filling.

To offset the sweetness it’s often served with dried fish.

This breakfast of champs can be eaten in roadside carinderias or try the triple chocolate version at Max’s Fried Chicken in various cities.

 

Halo-haloHalo-halo — the tastiest way to ward off the heat.

40. Halo-halo

Many people joke that the Philippines has two seasons: hot and hotter. Cool off with some halo-halo.

In Manila, Milky Way Café offers the best halo-halo with finely shaved ice and a generous serving of leche flan, gulaman, ube, banana, kaong, beans and garbanzos, milk and a scoop of ube ice cream.

Milky Way Café, 2/F, 900 A. Arnaiz Ave., corner Paseo de Roxas, Makati; +63 2 843 4124

 

Buco pieBuco pie — another way to eat the king of coastal fruits.

41. Buco pie

Go loco over coconut. In the province of Laguna, buco pie (young coconut pie) wars are hot. Each claims to be the best.

Orient D’ Original may have a tacky name but this pie shop has been a favorite for 45 years.

They serve the pie hot, with a delicious filling with generous layers of tender coconut meat.

Orient D’ Original, National Highway, Los Banos, Laguna, +63 4 9536 3783

 

42. Ensaymada at tsokolate

Ensaymada is a handmade cheesebread topped with sugar and cheese, and best served with thick Filipino hot chocolate.

Mary Grace cafe serves this unbeatable combination popular for breakfast or an afternoon snack.

www.marygracecafe.com

 

Pastillas de LechePastillas de leche — light, sugary and perfect with a cup of tea.

43. Pastillas de leche

Made from fresh carabao milk and sugar, this sweet confection is stirred until thick and melts in the mouth. Each piece is double wrapped in paper.

Traditionally, in the province of Bulacan, they hand cut ornate designs for the wrapper. A consistent source of all things pastillas is Bulacan Sweets with more than 40 years experience in making these sweets.

Bulacan Sweets, 155 N.S. Amoranto Ave., Quezon City, Metro Manila; +63 2 740 2171

 

Puto BumbongPuto bumbong — one of the world’s few purple foods.

44. Puto bumbong

These may look like miniature chimneys along the roadside stalls, but that’s what gives the chewy purple snacks their name.

Traditionally, purple mountain rice was used to make these, steamed in bamboo tubes, then served with butter, panocha (brown concentrated sugar) and grated coconut.

The Via Mare chain has been consistently producing chewy snack for years.

 

TuronTuron — if you thought bananas shouldn’t crunch, think again.

45. Turon

This fried banana with langka (jackfruit) all sealed in a lumpia wrapper is our version of a sweet spring roll.

It is peddled around the cities and towns for the perfect merienda (mid-morning or afternoon snack).

 

Pan De SalPan de sal — simple breakfasts are sometimes all you need.

46. Pan de sal

Pan de sal are small oval buns often eaten by Filipinos for breakfast. A brownish crust conceals a soft and fluffy inside. The best pan de sal is baked in an oven using firewood, naturally infusing the wood flavor into the bread.

Everyone has their favorite bakery, but Pan de Manila with outlets all over Metro Manila is consistently delicious.

www.pandemanila.com.ph

 

TahoTaho — the sweetest mush you’ll ever eat.

47. Taho

Brown sugar syrup is stirred into warm soybean custard and topped with sago pearls.

Traditionally sold by vendors walking the streets calling out to those at home, but can also be sourced from supermarkets and restaurants.

 

Tablea TsokolateTablea tsokolate — hot chocolate, but not as you know it.

48. Tablea tsokolate

A customary hot chocolate drink that stems from Spanish colonial times, tablea tsokolate is made from tablea de cacao — bittersweet, thick flat chocolate disks.

The traditional version is available at Adarna Food and Culture.

 

Halayang UbeHalayang ube — two purple foods in one list? World’s going crazy.

49. Halayang ube

The ube or purple yam is a popular ingredient used for desserts and here it’s made into a sweet halayang ube (ube jam).

For decades the nuns of the Good Shepherd Convent in Tagaytay have been producing this jam. Their product is smooth and creamy, and helps provide a livelihood to the single mothers who make them.

Good Shepherd Convent, Good Shepherd Bahay Pastulan, Maryridge, Iruhin West, Tagaytay City, Cavite; +63 46 483 3590; www.goodshepherdsisters.org.ph

 

Leche FlanLeche flan — the dessert of connoisseurs.

50. Leche flan

This is a popular dessert among locals — an egg and milk-based custard capped off with glistening caramelized sugar.

 

Link

Signs You Grew Up Filipino…

This post is mainly about food. But then again, isn’t that the best part of being Pinoy?

Check out this link:

Signs You Grew Up Filipino…

1. This was a perfectly normal breakfast.

This was a perfectly normal breakfast.

Spam, good. Eggs, good. Rice, obviously good.

2. But this was your actual favorite breakfast.

But this was your actual favorite breakfast.

MMMM TAPSILOG. Nom nom.

3. And when all else failed there was always this.

And when all else failed there was always this.

Sweet bread for breakfast? Yes, please…

4. You have no idea how to make rice on the stove, only in a flowery rice cooker.

You have no idea how to make rice on the stove, only in a flowery rice cooker.

5. This was your “ketchup.”

This was your "ketchup."

The spicy kind was the best.

6. You had a hundred pairs of “tsinelas” spread around your house.

You had a hundred pairs of "tsinelas" spread around your house.

Because you immediately took off your shoes when you entered the house.

7. The only name you were ever called by was:

34 Signs You Grew Up Filipino

Like, you’re not even sure your parents know your real name.

8. Their names are lolo and lola, not grandpa and grandma.

Their names are lolo and lola, not grandpa and grandma.

9. You know you had to “mano” every adult in the house before you were allowed to go play.

You know you had to "mano" every adult in the house before you were allowed to go play.

10. Which was no easy task because you had approximately 15 “titas” and “titos” growing up.

Which was no easy task because you had approximately 15 "titas" and "titos" growing up.

And half of them weren’t actually related to you.

11. Every year you sent a giant cardboard box to your relatives in the Philippines.

Every year you sent a giant cardboard box to your relatives in the Philippines.

The contents of which were 99% Spam.

12. You immediately turn your head when you hear these phrases.

You immediately turn your head when you hear these phrases.

13. This is how your mom points.

34 Signs You Grew Up Filipino

Hand me the “ano.”

14. Your Thanksgiving includes a few unconventional items.

Your Thanksgiving includes a few unconventional items.

Note the lumpia, rice, kare kare, pancit, etc…

15. Nothing makes your mouth water faster than the sight of pan de sal.

Nothing makes your mouth water faster than the sight of pan de sal.

16. Your family does most of its grocery shopping here.

Your family does most of its grocery shopping here.

Or the local “Asian food store.”

17. And this was your bakery.

And this was your bakery.

18. You could really go for an ice-cold halo halo right now.

You could really go for an ice-cold halo halo right now.

19. All of your relatives came over every time this guy was fighting.

All of your relatives came over every time this guy was fighting.

Manny Pacquiao. Represent.

20. Your family car definitely has one of these hanging somewhere.

Your family car definitely has one of these hanging somewhere.

21. You call this an “air-con” not an A/C.

You call this an "air-con" not an A/C.

22. You were constantly being asked if you had finished your Kumon.

You were constantly being asked if you had finished your Kumon.

23. You played at least one musical instrument growing up.

You played at least one musical instrument growing up.

And you had to learn the Suzuki method.

24. Your parents were always particularly creative when it came to saving money.

34 Signs You Grew Up Filipino

25. Adobo is your love language.

Adobo is your love language.

26. You know your mom didn’t know what to cook when you saw this was what you were eating for dinner.

You know your mom didn't know what to cook when you saw this was what you were eating for dinner.

27. You never threw away your plastic silverware.

You never threw away your plastic silverware.

Because you know, “sayang”…

28. But let’s be honest, half the time you didn’t actually eat with silverware.

But let's be honest, half the time you didn't actually eat with silverware.

29. This looks very familiar.

34 Signs You Grew Up Filipino

Aunties getting craaaazy!

30. Every family gathering ends with a rousing round of karaoke.

Every family gathering ends with a rousing round of karaoke.

31. You were always looking for ways to rep the Filipino flag.

You were always looking for ways to rep the Filipino flag.

32. You love joking about being a FOB, but the second anyone else calls you one, you’re like:

You love joking about being a FOB, but the second anyone else calls you one, you're like:

DA HELL? Not cool.

33. Taglish was your native tongue.

Taglish was your native tongue.