Japanese scientist synthesizes meat from human feces

poop burger 1Digital Trends:

Somehow this feels like a Vonnegut plotline: population boom equals food shortage. Solution? Synthesize food from human waste matter. Absurd yes, but Japanese scientists have actually discovered a way to create edible steaks from human feces.

Mitsuyuki Ikeda, a researcher from the Okayama Laboratory, has developed steaks based on proteins from human excrement. Tokyo Sewage approached the scientist because of an overabundance of sewage mud. They asked him to explore the possible uses of the sewage and Ikeda found that the mud contained a great deal of protein because of all the bacteria.

The researchers then extracted those proteins, combined them with a reaction enhancer and put it in an exploder which created the artificial steak. The “meat” is 63% proteins, 25% carbohydrates, 3% lipids and 9% minerals. The researchers color the poop meat red with food coloring and enhance the flavor with soy protein. Initial tests have people saying it even tastes like beef.

Inhabitat notes that “the meatpacking industry causes 18 percent of our greenhouse gas emissions, mostly due to the release of methane from animals.”

Livestock also consume huge amounts of resources and space in efforts to feed ourselves as well as the controversy over cruelty to animals. Ikeda’s recycled poop burger would reduce waste and emissions, not to mention obliterating Dante’s circle for gluttons.

The scientists hope to price it the same as actual meat, but at the moment the excrement steaks are ten to twenty times the price they should be thanks to the cost of research. Professor Ikeda understands the psychological barriers that need to be surmounted knowing that your food is made from human feces. They hope that once the research is complete, people will be able to overlook that ugly detail in favor of perks like environmental responsibility, cost and the fact that the meat will have fewer calories.

The hidden, scientifically accurate backstory of Tokyo Disney Sea’s volcano

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RocketNews 24:

Tokyo Disney Resort, as anyone can tell you, is a land of magic and whimsy. As we’ve shown before, it’s also somewhere you can experience the pinnacle of attentive service, whether you’re an inattentive motorist or a lost cat. But did you know that in addition to all that, Tokyo Disney Sea is actually a place that you can enjoy for its subtle yet precise depictions of natural science?

It’s true, as explained by one Japanese Twitter user who’s uncovered and documented the geological principles behind one of the park’s most iconic features.

It’s safe to say Twitter user Shohei Nanri’s inquisitive mind works a little differently than most people’s. On a recent trip to Disney Sea, Nanri decided to search for ways to enjoy the park not as a star-struck animation fan, but as a scientist. He wasted no time, noticing that the globe in the center of the fountain outside the ticket booth has no tilt to its access.

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But while that’s a miss in the scientific accuracy department, things quickly improved once inside the park itself. First stopping by the knowledge-themed Fortress Exploration complex, Nanri observed the castle’s Foucault pendulum, which knocks over a series of pins during the day due to the rotation of the earth.

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And while he’s not sure if Disney’s Imagineers planned it or not, Nanri found a waterfall in the walkway linking the Mermaid Lagoon and Mysterious Island Sections of the park (directly opposite the gyoza dog concession stand) where the light refracts into a rainbow at precisely 12 noon on sunny days.

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But where things start to get really interesting is inside Mysterious Island, the design of which is, ironically, remarkably sensible if you know the science behind it.

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The most dynamic feature of the area is Mount Prometheus, a constantly smoldering volcano that soars some 51 meters (167.3 feet) above guests’ heads. Much as Cinderella’s Castle is the symbol of Tokyo Disneyland, Mount Prometheus is the first image that comes to mind for many when they think of Disney Sea. Its non-Japanese name isn’t just a quick way to add a bit of worldly flair, though.

As Nanri explains, the lava of most Japanese volcanoes is highly viscous, so once its destructive path is halted, it tends to harden into symmetrical masses. But take a look at the volcanic runoff at Disney Sea.

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

Those ropy, coiled formations are the product of a low-viscosity lava flow, closer to the pahoehoe style seen in other countries than Japan’s indigenous a’a lava flows. As such, it stand to reason that Mount Prometheus isn’t a Japanese volcano, and therefore it wouldn’t make sense for it to have a Japanese name.

But that’s just the start of the tale Disney Sea’s lava has to tell. Looking at the map, we can see that following an eruption, some of Mount Prometheus’ lava would flow towards the shoreline that separates it from the Mediterranean Harbor.

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The molten rock would cool as it travelled, and Nanri explains that once it did, it could solidify in hexagonal columns, which is exactly what you can see near the waterfront.

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That’s not the only effect an eruption would have on the surrounding landscape, though. The entrances to both of Mysterious Island’s rides, Journey to the Center of the Earthand 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, owe the look of their entrances and line-up areas to the nearby volcanic activity.

▼ Locations of Journey to the Center of the Earth (1) and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (2)

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Let’s start with 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, where parkgoers hop aboard a vessel and become part of Captain Nemo’s crew of explorers.

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You might notice the sunken body of water is surrounded by craggy rock formations. How come? Because, as Nanri explains, it’s a crater lake formed by a steam explosion, which explains why you can still see some sort of gas fizzing to the surface of the water in the above photo.

However, the scientific significance is deepest, appropriately, at Journey to the Center of the Earth.

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Given the theme of the attraction, it’s no surprise that the entrance leads guests through a cave. This isn’t just any cave, though. Coming back once again to that low-viscosity lava, the thinner consistency means that even as the top layer of the flow comes into contact with the air, cools, and hardens, the lower layers can stay in motion, in the process forming a tunnel just like the ones the line for the ride snakes through.

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In the case of repeated eruptions, the next lava flow would come through and melt away the hardened rock, making the cavity larger and also creating the shelf-like ripples on its walls.

Of course, while this is the scientific way in which the tunnel would form, it’s still not a controlled, entirely stable method. A lack of structural integrity in spots is to be expected, which accounts for the skylight-like openings that can be occasionally seen overhead.

Finally, Nanri leaves us with one last example of attention to minute details.

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Looking up at those streaks of discoloration, you might think it’s just accumulated grime, or maybe water staining. It’s neither, though, according to Anri, who points out that this is what would happen as the sulfur deposits which melted in the lava flow later recrystallize.

Study reveals Chinese speakers use more of their brain than English speakers

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Shanghaiist:

A study has found that people who speak tonal languages such as Mandarin or Cantonese use both hemispheres of their brain rather than just the left hemisphere, which researchers have long emphasized as being the primary processing center for languages.

Quartz sorts out the report, which was recently published in the in the Proceedings for the National Academy of Science:

After analyzing brain imaging data from Mandarin and English speakers listening their respective languages, researchers from Peking University and other universities found that native Mandarin speakers and native English speakers both showed evidence of activity in the brain’s left hemisphere. But Mandarin speakers also saw activation in the right hemisphere, specifically in a region important for processing music, via pitch and tone, that has long been seen as largely unrelated to language comprehension.

Since at least the 1950s, researchers in the field of neurolinguistics have been questioning how languages influence perception, and physiological behavior. This latest study supports one emerging theory, connectionism, that maintains that some languages require interactions across the entire brain. The findings are important for better protecting language-related regions during brain surgery as well as understanding the “constitution of knowledge of language, as well as how it is acquired,” according to the study.

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It can be reasonably concluded then that all native speakers of tonal languages, including Vietnamese, Cantonese and Thai, use more of their brain than non-tonal language speakers, Gang Peng, a co-author of the study, told Quartz. Bonus: these speakers are more likely to have perfect pitch.

A Japanese firm could build this $26 Billion underwater city in 20 Years

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Next Shark:

Japanese architectural firm Shimizu Corporation just released designs for the world’s first self-sustainable, eco-friendly underwater city. It definitely puts Peter Thiel’s island-city utopia dreams to shame.

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The firm’s design is like a super-futuristic version of Rapture from the atomic-aged video game “Bioshock,” boasting underwater laboratories, factories, a deep-sea mine and living space for about 5,000 permanent residents.

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Food will come from aquaculture stocks and fish farms, drinkable water will be produced by desalination plants, thermal conversion plants will provide enough electricity to power the entire city, and pollution will be sent to the ocean floor where it will be converted into methane gas by carbon-eating microorganisms.

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The bulk of the city’s “Blue Garden” sphere (approximately 500 meters in diameter) will be underwater, and the rest of the city will extend all the way down to the ocean floor 3000 meters below to the “earth factory.” The sphere itself will hold a 75-story tower of apartments for residents.

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The designers of the city also rendered drawings that show what the futuristic underwater lifestyle will look like.

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Architects also went deep with the realistic logistics of the city with design specifications that account for the stresses of the ocean and are designed to prevent any kind of Atlantis-type disaster.

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It might all look too awesome to be a real thing one day, but the firm insists that it’s the real deal. According to Fast Company, “The company believes it’s feasible and has been working on the details with experts from Japanese universities and national agencies.”

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The entire project is set to cost at least $26 billion and can apparently be constructed by 2035. The greatest obstacle is that the city is designed to be built in the water using a massive, floating 3-D printer, which has yet to be constructed. Living in an underwater city could be possible within this lifetime. How badly would you want to see this happen?

 

Japan researchers target 3D-printed body parts

Tsuyoshi Takato, a professor at the University of Tokyo Hospital, displays an artificial ear made of polyactic acid and designed by a 3D printer at his laboratory in Tokyo on January 16, 2015

 

Yahoo News/Japan Times:

Japanese scientists say they are on their way to being able to create custom-made skin, bone and joints using a 3D printer.

Several groups of researchers around the world have developed small masses of tissue for implants, but now they are looking to take the next step and make them functional.

Tsuyoshi Takato, a professor at the University of Tokyo Hospital, said his team had been working to create “a next-generation bio 3D printer“, which would build up thin layers of biomaterials to form custom-made parts. His team combines stem cells — the proto-cells that are able to develop into any body part — and proteins that trigger growth, as well as synthetic substance similar to human collagen.

Using a 3D printer, they are working on “mimicking the structure of organs” — such as the hard surface and spongy inside for bones, Takato said.

In just a few hours, the printer crafts an implant using data from a Computer Tomography (CT) scan.

These implants can fit neatly into place in the body, and can quickly become assimilated by real tissue and other organs in the patient, the plastic surgeon said.

We usually take cartilage or bone from the patient’s own body (for regular implants), but these custom-made implants will mean not having to remove source material,” Takato said.

The technology could also offer hope for children born with bone or cartilage problems, for whom regular synthetic implants are no good because of the rate of their body’s growth. The main hurdle was the heat generated by conventional 3D printers, which damages living cells and protein.

We haven’t fully worked out how to avoid heat denaturation but we already have some models and are exploring which offers the most efficient method,” he told AFP.

The artificial protein Takato and his team use was developed by Fujifilm, which has been studying collagen used in photographic films. Since it is modelled on human collagen and does not derive from animals, it can be easily assimilated in human bodies, reducing the risk of infections such as mad-cow disease.

Takato said the team aims to start clinical tests of 3D-printed skin in three years and then proceed to bones, cartilages and joints.

Researchers say their previous project on the custom-made “CT-Bone“, developed with Tokyo-based firm Next 21 and governmental institutions, gave a hint to this latest study.

That technique uses calcium phosphate, the substance that makes up real bones, but does not contain stem cells. CT-Bone implants are inserted into broken bones, or places where the bone is missing, to act as a scaffolding for new bone growth. That new growth can overtake the implant after two years, with the host bone serving as an incubator.

Animal tests have suggested regeneration could be even quicker for implants that use collagens, stem cells and growth stimulus, Takato said. Japanese medical authorities are expected to grant approval for putting CT-Bone to practical use this year.

Bill Nye the Science Guy explains the process of evolution… using Emoji

In a recent video for Mashable, Bill Nye the Science Guy explains the process of evolution using emoji.

For a more complete look at the topic of evolution, Nye recently published the book “Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation.”

Dr. Masaru Emoto dies- The passing of a legend

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The Spirit Science:

When I was probably no more than 12 or 13 years old, my mom showed me a movie I will always remember today as one of the first times I questioned the world. The movie was called What the Bleep Do We Know?” and as many of you know, it discussed the nature of consciousness from a scientific, but yet very practical and spiritual way. It was the first time I was introduced into quantum physics, and the first time I learned about Dr. Emoto.

 

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Dr. Masaru Emoto was a world renown scientist that had been visually documenting molecular changes in water by means of his photographic techniques,  and in doing so expanded our concept of Consciousness.  His work has influenced millions, and paved the way for a massive transformation in the evolution of consciousness, quantum physics, and our understanding of reality. His work was legendary.

This morning, Masaru Emoto passed away peacefully with his beloved wife by his side.

Since he became ill in Shanghai, he has received so much love and gratitude from his dear friends of all over the world. He was very encouraged and happy to receive all of the kind messages with love.

His last word was “Arigato”. (“Thank you” in Japanese) The IMH staff said this last word was to you, everybody. He was so grateful for you and thanked you all so very much.

He used to say, “Life is LOVE which is a gift from God and parents, and DEATH is gratitude for going to a new dimension”. So now he is in another dimension and continues to look over us warmly with love and gratitude.

We are going to carry on his mission of spreading the power of “love and gratitude”.

Masaru Emoto was born July 22, 1943 and he was a Japanese author and entrepreneur who claimed that human consciousness has an effect on the molecular structure of water. Emoto’s conjecture has evolved over the years. Initially, he believed that water could take on the “resonance” of “energy” which was directed at it and that polluted water could be restored through prayer and positive visualization.  In 1986 he established the IHM Corporation in Tokyo. In October of 1992 he received certification from the Open International University as a Doctor of Alternative Medicine. Subsequently he was introduced to the concept of micro cluster water in the US and Magnetic Resonance Analysis technology. The quest thus began to discover the mystery of water. Emoto has stated,

 

“Water is the mirror that has the ability to show us what we cannot see. It is a blueprint for our reality, which can change with a single, positive thought. All it takes is faith, if you’re open to it.”

 

Emoto’s book The Hidden Messages of Water was a New York Times best seller. Emoto’s water crystal experiments consist of exposing water in glasses to different words, pictures or music, and then freezing and examining the aesthetics of the resulting crystals with microscopic photography. Emoto makes the claim that water exposed to positive speech or thoughts (intention) will result in “beautiful” crystals being formed when that water is frozen and that negative intention will yield “ugly” frozen crystal formations.

 

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Japanese Internet service provider au Hikari creates a Rube Goldberg machine that runs on light

Japanese Internet service provider au Hikari created an intricate and fascinating Rube Goldberg machine of sorts that uses a solid beam of light as fuel. The amplified light fuels a number of different elements like a tub of water and a marble moving down a chute, but it all keeps coming back to optics.

The company also has a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the short.

Video

Filipino teen creates footwear that can charge phones and access electricity

A fifteen-year-old Filipino teen named Angelo Casimiro has created a new way to charge a phone or flashlight with footwear that can generate electricity by walking.

He recognizes that this concept may not seem necessary for everyone. After all, who wants to walk when they can just plug their phone into a charger and go on with their full day of watching Netflix? Well, this is certainly not the average day for everyone.

I’m a Filipino. I live in the Philippines. And just by looking around my surroundings, I can see that a lot of people are suffering from poverty,” explains Casimiro. “A simple source of light is a big deal for people who don’t have electricity.”

The footwear was Casimiro’s entry to Google’s Science Fair this year. He realized that the average human takes 7,000 steps a day and wanted to find a way to utilize that energy.

Of course, this will still take quite some effort. During Casimiro’s experiments, he was able to give his phone about 10 minutes of battery life after two hours of playing basketball. None the less, this is clearly a start to something extraordinary.

Link

North Korea invented a Gatorade that’s made from fungus

 

North Korea Invented a Gatorade That's Made From Fungus

Gizmodo:

Once again, North Korea has positioned itself at the forefront of some of the greatest state-of-the-art, trailblazing, pseudo-scientific delusions the world has ever known. This time, in the form of a fungus-based sports drink.

A recent report straight out of North Korea’s Central Mushroom Research Institute of the State Academy of Sciences (North Korea’s premier mushroom science outlet) describes their incredible find:

 

[We] succeeded in finding the way to cultivate mushroom fungus and made a functional drink. This natural drink is very effective in enhancing physical ability of sportspersons and recovering from their fatigues.

 

The report does not, however explain how the drink manages to benefit their illustrious sportspersons, how it’s made, or how it tastes. Then again, mystery is what North Korean science is all about. And nothing tops off your weekly meal like a glass full of fungus. [The Guardian via BetaBeat]

 

Check out this link:

North Korea invented a Gatorade that’s made from fungus