Relive your childhood on your Mac with this Nintendo 64 & PlayStation emulator

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The games of yesteryear are now within your reach with all-in-one game emulator OpenEmu‘s latest update, which adds popular titles from PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Sega, Atari and the like onto your Mac.

Free to download, OpenEmu features real time gameplay rewind, enhanced screenshot organization, improved home brew support and various interface upgrades, making the perfect game emulator to play to your heart’s content.

The below 16 consoles are now supported with this update:

Atari 5200 (Atari800)
Atari 7800 (ProSystem)
Atari Lynx (Mednafen)
ColecoVision (CrabEmu)
Famicom Disk System (Nestopia)
Intellivision (Bliss)
Nintendo 64 (Mupen64Plus)
Odyssey²/Videopac+ (O2EM)
PC-FX (Mednafen)
SG-1000 (CrabEmu)
Sega CD (GenesisPlus)
Sony PSP (PPSSPP)
Sony PlayStation (Mednafen)
TurboGrafx-CD/PCE-CD (Mednafen)
Vectrex (VecXGL)
WonderSwan (Mednafen)

‘A Gamer’s Journey: The Definitive History of Shenmue’ documentary trailer

Gamers nowadays instantly turn to titles like Grand Theft Auto V or Sleeping Dogs for open-world exploration action-adventure games, but back in the late 90′s this large-scale way of gaming just didn’t exist. Along came a developer named Yu Suzuki, a platform called Sega Dreamcast, and a game called Shenmue, which would go on to change the industry.

Hordes of adoring fans, a highly successful sequel, and a decade of silence later, Mr. Suzuki walked onto the stage of E3 2015, along with a $2 million dollar Kickstarter campaign, and publically announced Shenmue III will happen. Everything that was so loved with the past titles – the cinematic cut scenes, in-depth story-telling, innovative features like dynamic weather and day-night variations – may seem standard for what games should offer now, but fans all over the world are beyond excited for what Suzuki and his team have in store for us when the third game drops some time in the near future.

To whet our appetites, filmmaker Adam Sipione and Fauxpop Media release a trailer for an upcoming documentary titled A Gamer’s Journey: The Definitive History of Shenmue. The picture will chronicle the process and history of both the first and second game, along with in-depth info on how the games were conceived, how fans felt, their extensive history, and a closer look at the upcoming sequel. With the original Kickstarter goal of $2 million now currently doubled, Shenmue III and this documentary are not to be missed. Leave your comments below and share what you loved the most about Ryo Hazuki’s heroic adventures through modern Japan.

Sega to turn the addicting Puyo Puyo puzzle game into a live show in Tokyo for its 24th anniversary

2015.03.21 puyopuyo copy

RocketNews 24:

If you live outside of Japan, you’d be forgiven if you said you’d never heard of a wildly popular tile-matching video game Puyo Puyo. The puzzle game may have been initially inspired by Tetris, but the combination of competitive gameplay, cute characters, and a fun storyline have gained a huge following in Japan since it was first launched there in 1991.

And to celebrate the 24 years since gamers first got addicted to arranging rows of colorful, little blobs, Sega is turning the game into a live show next month with a cast of Japanese idols, actresses and models.

Puyo Puyo, which was first released on the Sega’s Mega Drive system in 1991, has become a hit in Japan and has spawned a series games over many different systems and even teamed up with Tetris last year to launch a crossover title. The game was originally created by the company Compile, but after it went bust in 2003, Sega got the rights and has been keeping Puyo Puyo alive for its many fans in Japan. Sega has said the special anniversary live show will be an original story based on the many characters that have come out of the series in the past 24 years, including the heroine Arle Nadja.

 

2015.03.21 puyopuyo mega drive

The show kicks off on May 2 and will have eight performances over five days in the Akasaka ACT Theatre in Tokyo. Among the cast are Japanese actresses, idols and a J-Pop star or two, including fashion model Risako Ito who will play the role of Arle. There will also be a chance to win a special edition Aime IC card to use to save your status in the latest arcade version of the game called Puyo Puyo Quest Arcade. And everyone who comes to the show will be given a special code to use in the Puyo Puyosmartphone app.

▼ A flyer for the 24th anniversary live Puyo Puyo show

2015.03.21 puyopuyo

Japanese netizens were excited to see one of their favorite video games coming to life with some shocked that it has been 24 years since Puyo Puyo first came out.

“2D vs. Katana” exhibition shows off recreations of swords from anime and video games in Osaka

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RocketNews 24:

Last year, Tokyo’s Ueno Royal Museum held an exhibition of Japanese swords inspired by the mechanical and character designs of landmark anime Evangelion. As cool as some of the pieces looked, though, you won’t find any scenes in the giant robot franchise where someone actually fights using a katana.

On the other hand, right now the Osaka Museum of History is holding an event that goes even further in bridging the gap between fantasy and reality, by displaying recreations of amazing blades seen in anime, manga, and light novel illustrations.

Running from now until December 23, the 2D vs. Katana exhibition has teamed up master swordsmiths with over a dozen Japanese graphic designers. One of the biggest names involved is Kazuo Koike, whose manga Lone Wolf and Cub was one of the first Japanese comics to build an international fanbase. The sword of the series’ tortured protagonist, Ogami, is one of the pieces on display.

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Another artist likely to be familiar even to a non-Japanese atendees is Yoshitaka Amano. A veteran character designer whose career stretches back to the 1970s, Amano provided designs for TV anime Gatchaman and video game franchise Final Fantasy. Weaponry based off his artwork for the multimedia project Zan is being displayed as part of 2D vs. Katana.

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Despite the event’s name, the pieces aren’t all necessarily derived from traditional Japanese sword designs. For example, the Demon Sword, a product of the imagination of veteran science fiction and creature illustrator Yuji Kaida, would look just as at home in the hands of a knight as a samurai.

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Judging from online reactions, the biggest show-stopper seems to be a recreation of a drawing by Yumeji Kiriko, the manga artist of Le Chevalier D’Eon whose work has also appeared in Sega’s arcade trading card games Sangokushi Taisen and Sengoku Taisen. Since the respective settings of those three titles are 18th century France, China’s Three Kingdoms period, and Japan’s Warring States conflict, it seems like organizers could have played it safe with the sort of practical designs used by actual weapons in those eras. Instead, they decided to go with something a bit more ambitious.

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Yes, there seems to be a bouquet of flowers growing out of that sword’s hilt, and in order to stay faithful to the source material, the swordsmith incorporated it into the piece, as shown in this snapshot from early in the production process.

Likewise, losing the ludicrously long hand guard was not an option.

It’s hard to notice in the original illustration, but the sword is actually constructed of two blades, one nestled inside the other, with two prongs at the tip. Like the flowers and hand guard, this is the sort of flourish that’s not an issue at all when working with a pen and paper, but can be pretty problematic when the tools of your trade are hammers and steel. So how does the final result look?

Pretty awesome.

There’s no question those flowers would get torn off in the opening seconds of a fight, and looking at the handle, we’re not sure there’s actually enough room to wedge your fingers into the gap between it and the hand guard. But while the 2D vs. Katana exhibition allows non-flash photography, the event’s leniency doesn’t extend to letting guests grab the weapon of their choice and duel with each other. Taking that into consideration, you can’t really fault the choice to concede a bit of combat practicality when the payoff is that many extra style points.

Gamer Mold lets you make sweets in the shape of classic video game controllers

Controller-Mold

 

FoodBeast:

 

Every time we see a classic controller, the nostalgia feelings kick in. We remember waking up early on a Saturday morning, finishing the latest quest in Final Fantasy VII and spending our hard-earned GP at the Golden Saucer. The only thing better than recreating those memories would be doing so in cake form. Queue controller molds.

The silicone mold features three different controllers based off the classic Nintendo, Sony and Sega systems. It allows for two of each controller to be made at a single time. One can either create cakes with the molds, ice displays, or even pure melted chocolate ready to harden. The molds are yours to do with as you please.

The Classic Controller molds can be purchased at Think Geek for $10. They’re also dishwasher safe for you lazys.
Read more at http://www.foodbeast.com/news/gamer-mold-lets-you-make-sweets-in-the-shape-of-classic-controllers/#WwU7GY1zE0HMTXXI.99

Link

Japanese fan makes awesome 8-bit Final Fantasy art with just a screen door, ink, and a toothpick

 

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RocketNews 24:

 

Back in the heyday of Nintendo’s NESvideo game hardware wasn’t advanced enough to handle the kind of polygon-based visuals that are the industry standard today. Instead, artists had to bitmap their characters.

Bitmapping involves laying down squares of color, called pixels, to form an image. It’s essentially a digital mosaic, and with enough time and dedication, you could perfectly recreate the cast of your favorite 8-bit classic using a sheet of graph paper.

Or, as one retro fan in Japan recently did, a screen door.

Almost everyone in Japan hangs their laundry outside to dry, usually on a balcony. To provide easy access, many apartments have entire walls that are basically large sliding glass doors, with equally large screens behind them.

Most people just see that screen as a way to let in a little fresh air, but Twitter user Jenihara saw something different: a canvas.

The NES had a display resolution of 256 by 240, and while that’s a lot of pixels, it’s still way fewer than the number of boxes made by the grid of a screen door. In other words, there was nothing holding Jenihara back from sprucing hers up with a few Final Fantasy III characters.

 

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Using a toothpick to apply stained glass ink, Jenihara went to work, using four squares of screen door for every pixel in the character art. Even after quadrupling their sizes, though, there was still plenty of room, and in the end the creative artist finished a complete set of all the job classes in Squaresoft’s beloved role-playing game from 1990.

 

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Don’t assume that Jenihara is strictly a Nintendo loyalist, either, as her other muse is the 1986 Sega shooter Fantasy Zone.

 

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Exposure to air causes the ink to harden, and Jenihara says the colors look especially dazzling when the sunlight hits them, as you’d expect from artwork made with the same materials used for stained glass. For anyone who spent more hours growing up in front of an NES or Master System than inside a church, we’re sure it’s a similarly reverent sight.

 

Check out this link:

Japanese fan makes awesome 8-bit Final Fantasy art with just a screen door, ink, and a toothpick

Link

LEGO builder creates a life-sized statue of anime/Vocaloid character Hatsune Miku

 

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

Kotaku:

Making a life-sized Hatsune Miku statue is not easy. What’s more, it takes time. Lots and lots of time. This, for example, took six months’ worth of work. Hatsune Miku is a virtual idol who also stars in a series of Sega music games.

LEGO builder Chaos Brick documented the construction process. It’s not step by step, or better yet, brick by brick, but the photos are a fascinating look at how the finished piece came together.

 

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

There’s even the gratuitous panty shot. In LEGO. 

LEGO Builder Creates Life-Sized Hatsune Miku Statue

ChaosBrick [Twitter]

 

Check out this link:

LEGO builder creates a life-sized statue of anime/Vocaloid character Hatsune Miku