KFC sues 3 Chinese companies over claims of birds with 8 legs and 6 wings

KFC: Our chickens do not have eight legsNY Post:

Restaurant operator KFC said Monday it filed a lawsuit against three companies in China whose social media accounts spread false claims about its food, including that its chickens have eight legs.

The case filed by China’s biggest restaurant operator comes as the government intensifies a campaign to clean up rumors on social media. Internet marketers have been convicted of trying to manipulate online sentiment on behalf of clients by posting false information about competitors or deleting critical posts.

In an announcement posted on its Chinese website, KFC said one of the best-known fake rumors was that chickens used by the company are genetically modified and have six wings and eight legs.

KFC is demanding 1.5 million yuan ($242,000) and an apology from each of three companies that operated accounts on the popular mobile phone app WeChat. It is also seeking an immediate stop to their infringements. Shanghai Xuhui District People’s Court has accepted the case, according to a press officer who would only give her surname, Wu.

KFC’s China CEO Qu Cuirong said in a statement that it was hard for companies to protect their brands against rumors because of the difficulties in collecting evidence. “But the stepped-up efforts by the government in recent years to purify the online environment, as well as some judicial interpretations, have offered us confidence and weapons,” she said.

The companies being sued were named as Shanxi Weilukuang Technology Company Ltd., Taiyuan Zero Point Technology Company and Yingchenanzhi Success and Culture Communication Ltd. in Shenzhen city. Calls to numbers listed for the companies either rang unanswered or were not valid.

Authorities launched a renewed campaign two years ago to clean up what they called online rumors, negativity and unruliness. Critics say the campaign was largely aimed at suppressing criticism of the ruling Communist Party. Commentaries in state media have argued that a cleanup was needed.

KFC has more than 4,600 restaurants in China.

Man tries to smuggle 94 iPhones strapped to his body into China

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Next Shark:

Chinese people are so addicted to their iPhones that they need smugglers to help supply their fix. A Hong Kong man was arrested in China over the weekend for attempting to smuggle 94 iPhones into the mainland, according to CNN.

Customs officials at the Futian crossing in Shenzhen, a southern Chinese city bordering Hong Kong, told CNN that that they stopped the man after noticing that he walked like he was carrying a heavy load even though he was traveling with only two plastic shopping bags.

After being sent through a metal detector, the customs authorities found dozens of shrink-wrapped iPhones duct taped around the man’s chest, stomach, crotch and thighs. The haul included both the iPhone 6 and iPhone 5s models, and it’s estimated that the total value of the 94 iPhones exceeds 300,000 yuan ($49,000).

An iPhone 6 with 64 gigabytes of storage sells for almost $1,000 in the mainland, where its extremely popular, but only about $820 in Hong Kong, which has created a black market for enterprising smugglers.

Guangzhou (China) House of Vans 2014 Recap

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HYPEBEAST: 

The last stop of the House of Vans Asia tour concluded in the city of Guangzhou, providing a three-day program of diverse cultural offerings to the local community, as well as tourists alike. Although Guangzhou may not be the first place to spring to mind when one thinks of creative locales in China, the illustrious city has long been leading the line in economic and cultural developments, yearning only for a platform to showcase the creativity it has to offer. House of Vans provided this platform, where multiple workshops grounded in art and expression brought together the like-minded community and even mothers who took their infants to experience the occasion.

Kicking off the first day were renowned photographers Tobin Yelland and Lele Saveri, teaching students the art of self-publishing through DIY zine classes. Shanghai art duo Idle Beats carried on the momentum by educating design and illustration students on the entire process of making a screen print, from design to creation, and finally printing a custom tote bag. Taking a different approach than to the previous House of Vans events to represent the more edgy side of expression, tattoo artists from Sunrat Tattoo in Korea and famed Chengdu-based artist Keke offered up free tattoos of which were well-received, causing local kids to line up in front of the venue from the early morning hours in a bid for some free ink.

A House of Vans event would not be complete without a slew of talented local and international music acts. Thus, the evening portion of the festivities saw Hong Kong-based punk rock drummer Kevin Boy open the stage to pave the way for Beijing indie/synth band The Big Wave. The first night was then capped off with Montreal indie dance band We Are Wolves, which ended everything off in climactic fashion and made sure the crowd stayed dancing into the early hours of the morning. Saturday night showcased a more hip-hop-laden roster as local crew Chee Productions successfully whipped the packed house into a frenzy by bringing out a surprise performance by Beijing’s MC J Fever. However, the next act that followed was arguably the highlight of the evening, where special guest Pusha T performed a full set of his most popular songs and verses, from the likes of ‘Grindin” to G.O.O.D Music tune ‘Mercy.’ The musical performances did not stop there though and DJ duo Two Fresh brought things to a close with an explosive performance. Sunday night also saw a rap-infused event and an MC battle by the Iron Mic brought together a plethora of young aspiring artists to battle it out in front of friends and family.

Notwithstanding what Vans is predominantly known for, the three-day event also provided a program of skateboarding activities open to all. Independent skate/surf photographer Leong Zhang took out a crew of young photographers to give them insights into the intricacies required for shooting skating activities. Using the Vans China/Hong Kong skate team as the subjects for the class, the participants took note of the details and angles that transform a great photo into a legendary photo. Two days of skate contests for amateurs and pros were also offered as Chongqing artist Panda and local graffiti crew Dickid created a monster 6-meter tall, Sk8-Hi-inspired set filled with a mammoth quarter-pipe as well as street obstacles painted by American artist Rich Jacobs. The much-anticipated jam-format contests brought out the pro’s representing five local skate brands: Vagabond, 8FIVE2, HKit, Symbolic and Hero, who all battled it out to take home the winnings. After impressive displays of tricks and creativity from all those involved, it was the 8FIVE2 team from Hong Kong that took the title for best street run and Shenzhen-based team Vagabond winning the best quarter-pipe jam.

Enjoy the recap above and head over to House of Vans Asia for more information regarding the events, while you can also check out recaps of the previous stops in the tour here.

 

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

Image of Guangzhou House of Vans 2014 Recap

 

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What’s Uber’s strategy for gaining customers in Asia? One word: Puppies.

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Uber is spreading rapidly throughout Asia and around the world, and as it attempts to conquer new markets, it must ramp up its marketing to attract attention.

But in this day and age of constant distraction, in which consumers are unceasingly bombarded with calls to action from any number of consumer tech brands, what can a startup do to ensure it gets noticed?

We should all know the answer by now. Puppies.

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Today, Uber Taipei launched a promotion in which users aching for some puppy love could call for a vehicle that would deliver puppies on-demand to a specified location. Playtime lasted fifteen minutes, and required a NT$ 300 (about $12) donation to the Taiwan Life Caring and Animal Rescue Organization.

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We like to track Uber’s savvy marketing efforts because the company has mastered the art associating its brand with all-things-cute and all-things-hip. Last July the company delivered free ice cream to its customers in Singapore. It’s also offered promotions with up-and-coming startups in Asia, such as Korea’s Between and Taiwan’s WhatsTheNumber. Of course, these campaigns mark deliberate efforts to lure in early adopter-types and spread virally through social media. And in this case, users get the benefit of supporting a good cause as well.

Uber arrived in Taipei last June, and since then has expanded to Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai and Shenzhen. The company is valued at $3.5 billion.

Check out this link:

What’s Uber’s strategy for gaining customers in Asia? One word: Puppies.