Huayuan Art showcases Silk Road murals and Suzhou embroidery at Artexpo NY

13、莫高窟第249窟 阿修罗 西魏 80X60 (沈永平)

Beyond Chinatown (by Andrew Shiue):

You can see treasures from China’s cultural heritage that typically are not seen in museums and galleries at Artexpo New York at Pier 94 along the Hudson River.  Huayuan Art, an offshoot of an organization founded 23 years ago in Gansu, China and devoted to the cultural development of Northwest China brings to the fair elaborate replicas of the Silk Road Buddhist murals and a live demonstration of Suzhou’s silk craft.  Additionally, Huayuan will display other created through specialized craftmanship:  lacquer paintings, Nepali Thangkas, multi-layered paper cuttings and traditional Chinese paintings.

Huayuan will display 29 cave painting replicas based on murals from the famous Mogao Caves and the under-the-tourist-radar but equally exquisite Yulin Caves (榆林窟), and Maijishan Grottoes (麦积山石窟) that were hand-painted by Chinese artists Gao Shan, Shen Yongping, Liu Junqi, and Shi Dunyu.  These caves, with their exquisite wall paintings and sculptures, bear witness to the intense religious, artistic, and cultural exchange that took place along the Silk Road—history’s most famous trade route linking East and West.  The replicas are painted with traditional cave painting techniques, and authentically represent the current state of the caves, without hiding damage and conservation efforts.

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The replicas also show the lacquer painting techniques which are typically associated with Chinese and Japanese lacquerware.   In one highlight, Acolyte Bodhisattva on the North Side of the Buddha, artist Ma Ke uses natural lacquer, along with gold, silver, and other mineral pigments, to portray a standing Bodhisattva statue from the Mogao Caves with an elegant composition and lustrous finish.  With a slight smile playing upon his delicate face, this bodhisattva is one of the most distinctive and oft copied images from the caves.

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In addition to these frescos, other sacred art on view includes Huayuan’s collection of thangkas, Tibetan Buddhist paintings on fabric that depict deities, and mandalas and visually describe a deity’s realm.  Traditionally, thangkas are hung in monasteries or upon family altars, and are carried by lamas in ceremonial processions.  Originally designed to be portable mediums of spiritual communication and guides for visualization of deities, thangkas still hold great spiritual significance with Buddhist practitioners.  The name thangka is derived from thang, the Tibetan word for ‘unfolding’, which indicates the ability to be rolled up as a scroll when not in use, or for transport.  Every piece is hand-painted by Nepali lamas, with natural mineral pigments on fabric, each taking several months of meticulous work to complete.

Finally, Suzhou embroidery, the most celebrated style of Chinese silk art will be showcased through the works and a live demonstration by nationally recognized master artist Wang Lihua.  This art form is one of four main regional styles of Chinese silk art and is renowned for its use of the finest threads, elegant colors, dense stitching, and smooth finishes to create incredible detail and subtle lighting effects on stunningly realistic images reminiscent of oil paintings by the Dutch masters.

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Ancient Buddhist caves in China could ‘turn to sand’

The Art Newspaper:

 

The network of 236 sandstone caves extend over an area of two to three kilometres in the vast, sparsely-populated autonomous Xinjiang region of China, along the ancient Silk Road

Urgent conservation work is needed to save a series of caves in northwest China containing ancient murals by Buddhist monks, which are threatened with destruction from the forces of nature.

The network of 236 sandstone caves extend over an area of two to three kilometres in the vast, sparsely-populated autonomous Xinjiang region of China, along the ancient Silk Road. The caves were inhabited by Buddhist monks and used as temples between the third and the eighth centuries, and are lined with murals providing a rich picture of early Buddhist culture.

The caves, known locally as Kezer, are prone to deterioration, particularly from moisture, because of their geological composition, which includes many soluble salts. Although the region is very dry, any rainwater could have “distastrous consequences”, according to Giorgio Bonsanti, an expert in wall painting preservation. He told our sister paper, Il Giornale dell’Arte, “the signs of progressive decay, which in the long term would turn everything to sand, are dramatically evident.”

Bonsanti said that there have been efforts to buttress the mountains with cement and horizontal metal poles, which anchor the external layers of stone to more solid rock, but these fortifications are proving insufficient in the bid to save the caves.

The murals are particularly significant because of their stylistic similarity to Indian, rather than classical Chinese, art, which bears witness to the transmission of Buddhism to China from the south. In the early 20th century, many of the paintings were removed by Western archaeologists, notably the German expedition of Albert von Le Coq in 1906, and are now housed in museums including the Museum für Asiatische Kunst in Berlin and the Musée Guimet in Paris.

Around 10,000 people visit the caves each year—a fraction of the 800,000 who visit the Mogao caves further east along the Silk Road, which became a Unesco World Heritage site in 1987.

Although the situation is serious and urgent, the caves are not beyond saving. Bonsanti says that “In this battle against fatal natural processes, man is destined to surrender eventually, but hopefully the end of Kezer will not yet be seen for many generations to come.”

 
The caves were inhabited by Buddhist monks and used as temples between the third and the eighth centuries, and are lined with murals providing a rich picture of early Buddhist culture
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12 Reasons Lijiang Is The Prettiest City On Earth

Lijiang is a city in China’s southwestern Yunnan Province. According to social media, every other college grad in China dreams of quitting their jobs to become an innkeeper here.

Lijiang is a city in China's southwestern Yunnan Province. According to social media, every other college grad in China dreams of quitting their jobs to become an innkeeper here.

Hang around Chinese social media long enough and you’ll hear about China’s ‘Four New Yuppie Fads’.

But dreaming of moving to Lijiang is about the same order of twee as wanting to open a bookstore in Portland. Tell that to your friends in China and they’ll say, “sure, right.”

Hang around Chinese social media long enough and you'll hear about China's 'Four New Yuppie Fads'.

So why do young Chinese professionals want to quit their jobs and retire in Lijiang?

So why do young Chinese professionals want to quit their jobs and retire in Lijiang?

1. First of all: compared to the coastal cities, Lijiang’s relatively small, uncluttered and clean (the metro area has 1.2 million people).

First of all: compared to the coastal cities, Lijiang's relatively small, uncluttered and clean (the metro area has 1.2 million people).

2. Yulong Snow Mountain’s glaciers are just a few dozen miles outside of the city.

Yulong Snow Mountain's glaciers are just a few dozen miles outside of the city.

3. Scene walks thread around the city.

Scene walks thread around the city.

4. And there’s charming historic architecture aplenty.

Lijiang was an important trading post for the Silk Road, and the old city section is a World Heritage site.

5. Southwestern Chinese (Yunnanese) Chinese cuisine is also severely underrated.

6. There’s surprisingly decently nightlife and bars, since it’s consistently one of the most popular vacation spots for young people.

It can apparently feel Venice-ish and over-toured during high travel season, but every idyllic historic city is at risk of that sort of artifice.

There's surprisingly decently nightlife and bars, since it's consistently one of the most popular vacation spots for young people.

7. There’s a laid back music festival there.

8. People hang out near canals and drink in the middle of the day.

9. The city’s near pristine forests, lakes and other outdoor options.

The city's near pristine forests, lakes and other outdoor options.

10. It has its own unique culture.

Most of China’s Naxi ethnic minority call Lijiang home, though their relationship with the Han majority is complicated of course.

It has its own unique culture.

11. The air’s clean and the weather’s always sunny.

The air's clean and the weather's always sunny.

12. And true to its reputation among young travelers, it’s a city of inns and small hideaways.

(But avoid the repeated souvenir shops everywhere.)

And true to its reputation among young travelers, it's a city of inns and small hideaways.

This skyline is why every college grad in China wants to move here:

This skyline is why every college grad in China wants to move here:

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Books: Jen Lin-Liu’s “On the Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome with Love and Pasta”

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There are countless travelogues, cookbooks, and documentaries bringing diverse cultures of the world together with exciting cuisines in adventurous, often romantic storylines. Jen Lin-Liu’s On the Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome with Love and Pasta delivers that adventure along with an unsolved mystery of where the noodle originated–was it Italy, China, or somewhere in between? Tracing the path of famed Italian explorer Marco Polo, Lin-Liu embarks on a 6-month journey, traveling the historic Silk Road in search of the origins of the noodle.

On the Noodle Road documents her explorations deconstructing the plethora of noodle, meat, and dumpling-like dishes enjoyed in China, Central Asia, Iran, Turkey and Italy. It is a gastronomic journey steeped in the fascinating history of the Silk Road. Weaved into Lin-Liu’s story is a very striking gender and identity narrative that makes Lin-Liu’s book unique among food-related travelogues.

Lin-Liu is a Chinese American author and founder of Black Sesame Kitchen, an acclaimed cooking school in Beijing. Early on, we learn of her struggles growing up “Eastern” and “Western.” In her upbringing in Chicago and Southern California, she describes moments in her youth where she “wanted blonde hair and didn’t understand why we didn’t go to church like my friends’ families.

For much of her adult life Lin-Liu lived in China, where she claims she became more comfortable with her heritage: “But still, every so often, someone posed the question that had irked me since childhood, a question that seemed more complicated after I’d lived in China for so long: ‘Where are you from?’

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Books: Jen Lin-Liu’s “On the Noodle Road: From Beijing to Rome with Love and Pasta”