Taste the world this summer with Pretz versions of international food favorites

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RocketNews 24 (by Jamie Koide):

Kids in Japan only have about one more week left of school until summer vacation starts, while working adults are counting down the days until Obon vacation. It’s also the season where many Japanese snack makers start putting out limited summer edition flavors of your favorite snacks.

In fact, just today Glico launched a limited edition summer line of their popular Pretz series in Japan, so for those with no time or no money to travel abroad this summer vacation, you still have a chance to experience some exotic and not-so-exotic food flavors from across the ocean in the comfort of your very own home.

Pretz has been a long-selling favorite snack in Japan for many years. Not only did it later spawn the popular Pocky snack that Japan is best known for overseas, it’s been part of a number of tie-ups with famous partners, the most recent of which include current popular anime Youkai Watch and Snoopy/LINE.

Here in Japan we’re used to different Japanese-style Pretz flavors, but hitting store shelves today is Glico’s limited edition line-up of summer flavors, which include four special flavors that until now were only available as souvenirs brought back or received from each of these places abroad.

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While pineapple for Hawaii and maple for Canada seem pretty stereotypical, and mapo tofu is a popular Chinese dish that is readily available and well-liked in Japan, larb, which is actually regarded as the national dish of Laos, isn’t usually the first food that comes to mind when Japanese people think of Thai food. But apparently Glico thought this minced meat and vegetable salad dish, that’s pretty popular in the northern areas and other parts of Thailand, would sell well in stick form.

Be sure to grab all four to experience your own gourmet cruise around the world. We’re sure your tastebuds will thank us! Unfortunately you’ll have to act fast, as stock is limited and Glico only plans to sell them for until sometime around August.

Korean girls react to American snacks

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 Audrey Magazine:

While there are many videos of Americans reacting to Asian food and pop culture, the reversal is less common. Now a new YouTube series called “Korean Girls React” flips the Americans-react-to-Asian-culture video trend on its head.

In this video, Korean girls taste American snacks for the very first time and give their honest opinion of it. The snacks include Goldfish, Poptarts, Rice Krispies, salt and vinegar chips, Twizzlers, Cheez-Itz and Warheads.

While there were obviously many different opinions, a couple of interesting trends emerged. Most of the girls agreed that the poptarts tasted too artificial. One girl even complained that “it tastes like a candle.”

Rice Krispies seemed to be a favorite amongst most of the girls whereas the twizzlers and warheads were very, very unpopular.

One thing that viewers all over the world should be able to relate to are the complaints that the snacks were too unhealthy or fattening, followed by later admissions that the snacks are too addicting to be left uneaten. Ah, the power of junk food!

Craving Asian snacks from your childhood? Check out this homemade Choco Pie recipe!

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 Audrey Magazine:

When I was young, I spent most of my Saturdays at my grandmother’s house, secretly picking flowers off her houseplants, overfeeding her goldfish and eating up all her snacks that she would get from Chinatown. I say “all her snacks,” but my grandma really only had two snack foods in her cupboard — one was the family pack lemon puff biscuits, which always tasted dry and slightly artificial, and the other was Garden coconut wafers, which I knew had been laying around for a while. See, to save money, my grandma would buy the wafers in these big metal tins, which would take forever to finish. And for that reason, all the Garden wafers I’ve ever eaten at my grandmother’s house always tasted a bit stale. Still, I opted for the wafers over the biscuits.

I had a very specific method of eating the wafers. Because I was only allowed to have a few per visit, I would split the wafers into individual layers, so that it would seem like I had a whole lot more to eat than there actually was. As a kid, I would do this to all of my snacks, just to prolong my time with them. Sounds kind of silly, right?

But it’s funny how when I share these stories with my Asian friends, nearly all of them reciprocate with their own stories. My friend Timmy from Taiwan would freeze his lychee before eating them like little frozen popsicle balls. And my college classmate Grace, who grew up in Brooklyn, would take Haitai French Pie cookies, eat everything except the middle, and save the center apple pie filling for her last bites. “Always the last two bites because that was how the center fit perfectly into my mouth,” she says.

Of course, my love of Asian snacks didn’t end as a child. As a college student, the Japanese fruit gummy candies — you know, the ones that come in apple, kiwi, strawberry and lychee — were my ultimate companions for late night studying. A small confession is that I would bring them into the library as well. (An even bigger confession is I’ve prob- ably brought a snack into every library I’ve ever been in — and the culprit snack was usually Asian. I know, I know, but it’s hard to walk away once you’re in the studying groove.) Anyway, any “library snacker” can tell you that the hard part is not sneaking the snacks into the library, but eating them in silence. That takes skill, especially when you’re eating those crunchy rice crackers.

Now as an adult, I still find myself watching TV and curled up next to a bag of prawn crackers or snacking on the latest red bean, green tea and sesame Pocky. To this day, Asian snacks remain a comfort food for me. So here’s my own attempt at recreating that magic with a homemade Choco Pie recipe.

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INGREDIENTS

Cake:
– 1 1/4 cup cake flour
– 1/2 cup sugar
– 1 egg
– 1/3 cup milk
– 1/2 tsp baking powder
– splash of vanilla extract

Filling:
– 1/2 cup Marshmallow Fluff pr marshmallow creme

Chocolate Ganache Coating:
– 8 oz chocolate chips
– 1 cup heavy cream

 


 

DIRECTIONS
1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.
2. Make batter by mixing dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.
3. Fill whoopie pie pan or muffin tin with 1/4 inch of batter.
4. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until cakes turn golden brown on the underside. Let cool. (Tops may still look pale.)
5. Meanwhile, prepare ganache by bringing a cup of heavy cream to a boil.
6. Immediately remove from heat and pour on top of chocolate.
7. Whisk till smooth. Set aside.

 


 

TO ASSEMBLE
1. Cut tops off cake so that the surface is flat.
2. Spread about a teaspoon of marshmallow filling on the cake. Top it off with another cake, making sure the golden brown sides are exposed.
3. Place the assembled cakes on a wire rack with a sheet pan underneath to catch the ganache. Pour a small amount of ganache on top of each of the assembled cakes until the tops and sides are cov- ered. A spatula may be needed.
4. Let it set in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before serving.

 

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– Story and photos by Christina Ng
This story was originally published in Audrey Magazine’s Fall 2014 issue.

 

Link

Dunkin’ Donuts India debuts “Tough Guy Burgers”… Described as “Huge! Rugged! and Spicy!”

 

Tough Guy Burgers

Apparently, Dunkin’ Donuts wants to help you “Get Your Mojo Back” by offering two new Tough Guy burgers. Said to be Huge!Rugged! and Spicy!, the new items feature the Tough Guy Chicken Burger and the Tough Guy Veg Burger.

The Tough Guy Chicken comes with a toasted bagel bun topped with black and white sesame seeds, a chunky and spicy Mexican chorizo chicken patty, slices of paprika chicken, fiery mustard sauce with a traditional secret recipe, lettuce, onions, tomatoes and cheese.

The Tough Guy Veg comes with a toasted sesame bagel bun, a marinated yam patty, fiery mustard sauce, a country salad tossed in chipotle sauce, onions and cheese. While the chicken patty will run you  170 rupees ($2.84 US), the Veg burger is available for 130 rupees ($2.11 US).

Check out this link:

Dunkin’ Donuts India debuts “Tough Guy Burgers”