Trending in Japan: Using real rabbits as your smartphone case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Kotaku: 

Earlier this month, a Twitter user in Japan uploaded a photo of a “bunny smartphone case.” The image was retweeted over 37,000 times and, of course, has spawned a meme. Of course!

Here is the pic that started it all.

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

But hey, these are real animals. And they have feelings. They’re not smartphone cases. Though, maybe their ears help with the phone’s reception? (No! No, they don’t!)

It goes without saying that people aren’t actually using rabbits as real smartphone cases—like, carrying them around and whatnot. For better or worse, these are photo-ops.

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

And yes, other Japanese Twitter users followed suit.

As website News Gamme reports, the meme appears to have caught on in China, where people are uploading their photos to the country’s micro-blogging service, Weibo.

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

But in Japan, the trend doesn’t appear to have stopped at bunnies. There are cat smartphone cases, too, it seems.

Don't Use Real Rabbits as Your Smartphone Case

 

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Twitter now shows emoji characters on the web

 

Engadget:

 

Twitter shows off emoji on the web

There’s a good chance that some of your smartphone-toting friends use emoji to express themselves on Twitter — wouldn’t it be nice to see those icons while you’re surfing the web?

As of today, you can. Twitter has updated its web client to display emoji, giving you all the colorful characters that you’d expect while browsing mobile apps (and some desktop apps, too). The update won’t make it any easier to decipher the meaning of an emoji-laden tweet, but you’ll have at least some semblance of what’s going on.

 

Check out this link:

Twitter now shows emoji characters on the web

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Artist Profile: Manga artist Shiori Furukawa makes Friday the 13th sexy

 

On Japanese social media, Friday the 13th has translated into the Jason Voorhees movies more than it has bad luck. And, among the fun, manga artist Shiori Furukawa, who mostly writes shoujo romances, has offered her sexy take on the slasher.

 

Check out this link:

Artist Profile: Manga artist Shiori Furukawa makes Friday the 13th sexy

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An illustrated look at the differences between living in Hong Kong and Taiwan, by comic illustrator Jie Jie…

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Jie Jie is a Taiwanese comic artist living in Hong Kong. His comics have been making the rounds on Chinese social media. Here, he presents the 16 Differences Between Living In Hong Kong And Taiwan

Check out this link:

16 Differences Between Living In Hong Kong And Taiwan

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Facebook says it remains blocked in China’s Free Trade Zone

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Due to well-known restrictions on Internet usage in China, any report that says people are free to go about their social media ways is immediately cast with doubt. However, those who are hoping that the country’s stringent policies over online activity are easing will be glad to know that yes, finally, China is allowing some leniency when it comes to the Web… provided that you stay within the “free-trade zone,” according to a South China Morning Post (SCMP) report.

So where exactly is the free-trade zone? SCMP describes it as an area spanning 28.78 square kilometers in Shanghai, China’s largest city in terms of population. The zone will be located in the city’s Pudong New Area and will include the Waigaoqiao duty-free zone, the Yangshan deepwater port, and the international airport area. According to SCMP’s anonymous government contacts, over the next couple of years the free-trade zone will eventually cover the entire Pudong district – an additional 1210.4 square kilometers – provided that this year’s initial move proves to be economically fruitful for the nation down the road.

China has always been known to be extremely conservative when it comes to the Internet – to date, there are more than 2,000 websites that are both currently and previously blocked in the mainland (not including Macau and Hong Kong), and according to Amnesty International, China “has the largest recorded number of imprisoned journalists and cyber-dissidents in the world.

Given the country’s inclination to Web censorship, the fact that access to previously banned websites within the free-trade zone has been approved by the government could be perceived as a step in the right direction. Some of the websites that are reportedly permitted in the free-trade zone are social networks Facebook and Twitter – which were both banned in 2009 – and the New York Times, which was banned last year. (We have reached out to Facebook, Twitter, and the New York Times for comment and this story will be updated if we receive response.)

Additionally, China is open to foreign interest in setting up shop within the zone, specifically bids from telecommunications companies that offer Internet connectivity. China Mobile, China Unicom, and China Telecom, three of the country’s biggest telecommunications companies, reportedly have no qualms about the potential for foreign competition since they are all state-owned corporations and the final decision to let international investors in was sanctioned by China’s top-tier leaders.

“In order to welcome foreign companies to invest and to let foreigners live and work happily in the free trade zone, we must think about how we can make them feel like at home. If they can’t get onto Facebook or read The New York Times, they may naturally wonder how special the free trade zone is compared with the rest of China,” a source from the government told SCMP.

The Shanghai free-trade zone is scheduled for launch at the end of this month.

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Facebook says it remains blocked in China’s Free Trade Zone