James Jean x Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Collaboration

Image of James Jean x Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Collaboration

 

Re-applying his talents in a familiar arena, here acclaimed Taiwanese-American artist James Jean teams up with Nickelodeon and Japanese toymaker Good Smile Company to create an exclusive set of toys for everyone’s favorite underground heroes. Here we find Jean creating radical expressions of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, turned into four large-scale sculptures that create a diorama when together. The toys will make their public debut at Good Smile Company’s Comic-Con installation – running in New York between now and October 12.

Pre-orders will start up in November beginning with Leonardo, with the remaining three set to drop in 2015.

 

Image of James Jean x Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Collaboration

Link

New York City’s Barcade is all about the classic Japanese games

 

Taito-control-e1402093097273-768x1024

RocketNews 24/Japan Culture NYC:

 

Nostalgic for Japanese video games from the late 1970s and ‘80s? Barcade, a combination bar and arcade, recently opened in Chelsea, Manhattan with about a dozen classics from Japanese game developers such as Taito, Nintendo, Namco, and Konami.

The games are still only a quarter (there are change machines on site), and the machines are in great condition. Marvel at the old-school graphics of Space Invaders, Galaga, Mappy, Crazy Climber, and Frogger.

 

▼ Space Invaders

Space-Invaders-1024x795

Space-Invaders-screen-1024x768

▼ Galaga

Galaga-e1402092288354-768x1024

Galaga-screen-e1402092358876-768x1024

▼ Mappy

Mappy-e1402092444458-768x1024

▼ Crazy Climber

Crazy-Climber-e1402092506800-768x1024

 

Box against Piston Hurricane in Nintendo’s Punch-Out, and test your strength in that game’s spin-off, Arm Wrestling, which was released only in North America in 1985.

Nintendo-boxing-e1402092649372-768x1024

You won’t find Pac-Man, but Ms. Pac-Man is here. There’s generally a crowd of people around that console.

But who needs Pac-Man when there’s one of the most popular arcade games in the history of arcade games: Donkey Kong. Donkey Kong, with its barrel-throwing ape and barrrel-jumping carpenter, was one of the first video games to be a narrative. Rather than simply shooting at things, video game players could follow a storyline that was the precursor to the wildly popular Mario franchise.

Donkey-Kong-e1402092746869-886x1024

Donkey-Kong-screen-e1402092842925-980x1024

▼ Jumpman, the original Mario

Donkey-Kong-Mario-e1402092921793-768x1024

“Newer” Japanese games are Konami’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1989) and X-Men (1992).

 

There are a host of non-Japanese games as well; click here for a full list.

The best part of Barcade is that it’s a game room for adults. There are shelves between each machine on which patrons can rest their beers. It’s important to have both hands free while playing games, of course.

The original Barcade opened in Williamsburg in 2004 and has locations in Jersey City and Philadelphia. The Chelsea location is reportedly twice as large as the Barcade in Brooklyn, with 24 American beers and tap and pub food on the menu.

Barcade’s next location will be on St. Mark’s, in the space formerly occupied by Mondo Kim’s.

 

Check out this link:

New York City’s Barcade is all about the classic Japanese games

 

 

 

Link

Artist Profile: Hoang Tran impressively carves pop-culture icons from Crayola Crayons

 

My Modern Met:

Crayons don’t have to be just for coloring. In the case of Hoang Tran, they are the perfect material for tiny sculptures. Using large-size Crayola crayons, the artist delicately hand-carves them into pop-culture icons. Hello Kitty, Han Solo, and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are just some of the incredibly detailed figures that he’s able to produce.

As if these creations weren’t impressive enough, they are made even more so with the addition of color. Tran melts wax from other colors of crayons and applies it as an accent to the main figure. This small detail makes the work pop and the portrait instantly recognizable.

Tran’s handiwork is available for purchase through his Etsy shop. He doesn’t just carve fictional characters, though. If you’re looking for a custom-produced pet portrait made from a small stick of wax, then you’ve found your guy. Both pop culture characters and commissioned works are available to view on his Tumblr titled Wax Nostalgic.

Check out this link:

Artist Profile: Hoang Tran impressively carves pop-culture icons from Crayola Crayons

 







 

Hoang Tran Etsy shop and Wax Nostalgic Tumblr