Kanazawa Curry Cola lets you have your tonkatsu (fried pork cutlet) and curry on the go!

RocketNews 24:

Finally, the great taste of a fried pork cutlet drenched in thick curry that you can slip in your coat pocket without getting wet!

Sold by Japan’s Tombow Beverage Co., this cola is based on the Ishikawa Prefecture specialty dish Kanazawa Curry which is a large fried pork cutlet (tonkatsu) soaking in a rich curry roux and topped with a drizzling of tangy tonkatsu sauce and served with a side of shredded cabbage.

 

This isn’t the first time a curry beverage has been released in Japan, but Kanazawa Curry Cola may be the first to take a carbonated cola base and blend in the tastes of curry roux and tonkatsu sauce.

Whether or not that’s a winning combination will be knowledge bestowed on the lucky few who can acquire one of the 100,000 bottles Tombow is planning to bottle and sell this year.

You would be most likely to find one at the various service stations along highways in Ishikawa and Toyama prefectures as a part of the Hokuriku Regional Drink Series. However, Tombow said they will distribute around the country and if demand is great enough they’ll also consider ramping up production in response.

If you don’t feel like going on a wild curry cola hunt, you can always go to the Tombow website linked below to purchase a 20-pack for 3,900 yen (US$35). That’s not a terrible price considering, at the very least, Kanazawa Curry Cola sounds like it could be a highly effective laxative.

Kanazawa Curry Cola order page (Japanese)

Five simple ways to take your Japanese curry rice to the next level

RocketNews 24:

Curry rice is the perfect Japanese comfort food. It’s hearty, filling, sweet and just a little bit spicy, being a much milder version of Indian curry introduced to Japan by way of the British (you’re welcome, Japan!).

One of the best things about curry rice is how easy it is to customize it. You can subtly alter the flavour of the sauce by adding honey, apples, or even chocolate, and you can switch up serving methods by swapping the rice for udon or ramen. You can pour it over deep-fried pork katsu or seafood, or throw in all kinds of vegetables… the possibilities are endless!

But if you’re looking for ways to really step up your curry game, then we recommend trying some of these tips and tricks from professional curry chefs…

The standard formula for making easy curry rice at home is to fry up some onions, veggies and meat, then add water and finally curry roux (solidified curry paste sold in handy blocks that look like yummy chocolate). But there are a number of little things you can do to take even store-bought curry from cheap ‘n’ tasty evening meal to a dish to be genuinely proud of.

Tip 1 for extra-yummy curry rice is to make sure those onions are nice and fried before you add in the rest. Chefs recommend adding just enough water to keep your onions from burning while frying to make sure that the full flavour of the onions is brought out.

Tip 2: Top curry chefs recommend going the extra mile and adding in some spices to your sauce, even if you’re using boxed roux already. For extra colour, add a pinch of turmeric, and for fragrance, cumin or coriander. If you want your curry to have some extra bite, meanwhile, throw in some cayenne pepper.

Tip 3: Don’t stop at just adding water and roux if you want your curry to be extra thick and creamy. Add in some milk, cream or yogurt, too.

Tip 4: Top curry chefs also recommend bringing out the subtle undertones of the curry flavour by adding tomatoes, pickled plums, wine, citrus fruits, or black vinegar.

Tip 5: While this particular “tip” can be found on the back of most boxed roux, apparently hardly anyone tends to actually do it. When you’re adding the curry roux blocks, it’s essential that you remove the pot from the heat first and allow the roux blocks to melt into the already hot pot without applying direct heat. In fact, you don’t need to have the roux in there that long at all, and over-cooking the roux can wind up ruining the taste of the curry. Hmm… the more you know!

We hope that these curry tips will prove useful the next time you’re whipping up a batch of the yummy brown stuff. With its sweet, mild flavour, curry rice is the perfect introduction to Japanese cooking for those who are just getting started. Enjoy!

The defrosted reality of 24 frozen meals at Thai 7-Elevens

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 14

RocketNews 24:

The frozen food section at the local convenience store may not hold any lofty culinary treasures, but it does hold the key to saving time and energy after a long day. All around the world, people value frozen foods for their convenience and, sometimes, their deliciousness.

But can you really trust the picture on the front of the package to be what comes out of the microwave? One Thai netizen went on a quest to demystify the frozen food section of Thailand’s 7-Elevens and posted photos of 24 heated up meals to see how they compared to people’s expectations.

Lonelynite, a user of the Thai webforum Pantip, posted the photos to share what a diet of only frozen meals from 7-Eleven would look like. The meals all cost between 30 to 45 baht (US$0.92 to US$1.38) and were a variety of Southeast Asian, Chinese, and Western cuisine. There were even a few Japanese foods including karaage fried chicken or Japanese-style curry. While some of the food looked pretty good, some did not look appetizing at all. Check out all 24 meals below!

 

1. Fish in red curry fried with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 1

2. Pork fried rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 2

3. Japanese curry and tonkatsu (pork cutlet) with Japanese rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 3

4. Stir fried mixed vegetables and omelette with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 4

5. Shrimp fried rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 5

6. Korean-style chicken with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 6

7. Spaghetti carbonara with ham

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 7

8. Spaghetti with chili pork basil leaf

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 8

9. Stir-fried Japanese rice with salmon

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 9

10. Chicken sausage fried rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 10

11. American fried rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 11

12. Stir-fried basil shrimp with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 12

13. Stir-fried chicken with chili paste and bamboo shoots

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 13

14. Fried mackerel and shrimp paste sauce with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 14

15. Hainanese chicken rice with soup

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 15

16. Pork panang curry with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 16

17. Karaage chicken with Japanese rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 17

18. Spaghetti tomato sauce with chicken

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 18

19. Stir-fried basil vegetarian protein with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 19

20. Stir-fried pork and basil with rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 20

21. Noodles

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 21

22. Stir-fried pork with basil leaf and rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 22

23. Grilled pork steak with Japanese rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 23

24. Crab fried rice

2015.03.07 thai 7:11 25

How did the frozen meals of Thailand’s 7-Eleven match up to the photos on the package?

Tonkatsu McBurger gets an upgrade and joins the regular McDonald’s Japan menu

 

RocketNews 24:

 

Back in May, McDonald’s Japan unleashed the Tonkatsu McBurger highlighting Japan’s ubiquitous piece of breaded meat, the tonkatsu (deep-fried pork cutlet). Although it didn’t entirely win us over against Mos Burger’s tonkatsu burger when it first came out, the masses were pleased and cleaned out the burger chain of supplies before the Tonkatsu McBurger was scheduled to finish.

Due to that success McDonald’s will bring back the Tonkatsu McBurger but planned an added feature for its inauguration into the regular menu across Japan– a truly special moment in any sandwich’s life. This addition is an elaborately created sauce promising to heighten its flavor to a whole new level. But is it enough to win back customers lost after this summer’s chicken scandal?

The basic structure of the Tonkatsu McBurger will be the same as before: a breaded pork cutlet (using varying sized bread crumbs for maximum crispiness), shredded cabbage (which is found beside tonkatsu due to their complimentary nature), tonkatsu sauce, and some mustard.

However, this time the tonkatsu sauce has been redesigned through a revolutionary sauce developmental process. First, McDonald’s established the“Everyone Tonkatsu Sauce Research Group” which is a team of 15 civilians chosen from 3,000 applicants nationwide who worked with McDonald’s sauce engineers to come up with the best possible flavors.

This team then came up with a variety of tonkatsu sauces that were distributed to 60 McDonald’s outlets across Japan in what was called the Grand National Tonkatsu Sauce Tasting where customers could sample the sauces and vote on which ones they liked best.

The winner of this convoluted process was the Goma Katsu Sauce which boasts the savory and pungent aroma of sesame (goma in Japanese) infused in the regularly tangy taste of tonkatsu sauce. But that’s just the tip of the flavor iceberg with hints of miso and garlic buried deep within this topping.

Online chatter was all aflutter over the news with comments such as:

Crap. Don’t need it.”
“Expired meat, wrapped in expired bread, fried in expired oil.”
“You’re better off just buying tonkatsu at the supermarket.”
“The katsu sandwich at my station’s bakery is a better deal pound for pound.”
“I absolutely don’t trust McDonald’s.”

As you can see, there are still plenty of hard feelings towards McDonald’s since the tainted chicken scandal back in July. Aside from that there was a large number of complaints over the price of theTonkatsuMcBurger at around350 yen (US$3.26) for the sandwich and 650 yen ($6.05) for the combo.

It’s certainly a different world for the Tonkatsu McBurger from when it first emerged in May. Will its warm greasy pork melt the frigid hearts people in Japan have for the beleaguered burger chain?

Seattle restaurant serves Japanese katsu burgers and katsu ice cream sundaes

katsu-burger-1

FoodBeast:

 

Japanese katsu, for anyone who hasn’t yet been blessed with its presence, is a deep fried filet of breaded meat, usually chicken or pork. Tender and juicy, it’s typically served with rice and a healthy helping of sweet katsu barbecue sauce (plus a side of macaroni salad, if you’re getting it Hawaiian style). Basically it’s amazing, and a small Japanese burger joint in Seattle is putting it. on. everything.

Burgers. Pork nuggets. Even a katsu ice cream sundae. The fittingly named Katsu Burger in Seattle has been slinging deep-fried everything since 2011, according to its Facebook page.

Each burger comes with your choice of beef, pork, chicken, or tofu, a patty of which is then deep-fried and adorned with a range of American and Japanese toppings, from bacon and cheese to wasabi mayonnaise, miso honey mustard, and tonkatsu sauce.

Extra hungry hippos can also choose from the shop’s two Mega Burgers, the Tokyo Tower (which is basically a katsu-style Double Double), or the Mt. Fuji (which is pretty much everything on the menu all at once).

 

katsu-burger-3

 

In addition to the burgers, there are also a couple other Asian-inspired treats like the seaweed french fries or the green tea, chai, or soy flour and black sesame milkshakes. As for the aforementioned katsu sundae, the truth is it doesn’t actually use meat, but a katsu-fried red bean pancake called a dorayaki. Still that doesn’t make the thing any less dank.

 

katsu-burger-2

 

Our recommendation? Nab one of everything. And don’t forget to “Sumo Size” it.

 

Link

Travelers on Trip Advisor pick Japan’s 30 best restaurants

 

JR 5

RocketNews 24:

 

Travel website Trip Advisor recently released its annual list of the 30 best sightseeing spots in Japan. Featuring centuries-old shrines, futuristic cityscapes, and no fewer than four whale sharks, it’s an impressive collection of much of what makes Japan such a unique and awesome country.

Honestly, if you had the time, we wouldn’t try to talk you out of an itinerary that hits all 30 places. Of course, with that much sightseeing, you’re bound to work up an appetite. Thankfully, Trip Advisor is back again with its top 30 restaurants in Japan.

As with the sightseeing list, the rankings are based on reviews from Trip Advisor users who dined at the restaurants. While there’s no shortage of high-priced Japanese fare, there are a few budget-friendly eateries that made the cut too, along with some foreign cuisine as well. Let’s dig in and get this multi-course meal started with number 30.

 

30. Abucha Nigoten
Hokkaido,  Abuta-gun, Kucchan-cho, Yamada 191-29

JR 13

Visitors to the Niseko ski resort on Japan’s northern island of Hokkaido rave about this Japanese eatery’s sushi and hot pots.

29. The Niseko Supply Company
Hokkaido, Abuta-gun, Kucchan-cho, Azayamada 190-13

If you’re looking for western food in Niseko, the Supply Company is known for its crepes, pastries, and fondue, plus its invigorating coffee and relaxing beer.

28. Niseko Pizza
Hokkaido, Abuta-gun, Kucchan-cho, Yamada 167 3J, Sekka Building basement level 1

Not far from the above entry you’ll find this Italian restaurant that’s popular with the foreign community.

27. Jomon
Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Roppongi 5-9-17, Fujimori Building 1st floor

JR 2

Not only does Jomon serve up outstanding yakitori chicken skewers, its location on one of the secluded backstreets of Tokyo’s rowdiest nightlife district means you won’t have to worry about barkers trying to drag you off to their hostess bar on the way there.

26. Tsunahachi
Tokyo-to, Shinjuku-ku, Shinjuku 3-31-8

Just a few minutes’ walk from the always bustling Shinjuku Station, Tsunahachi’s mix of great tempura and moderate prices has had diners lining up out front for years.

25. Kani Doraku
Osaka-fu, Osaka-shi, Chuo-ku, Dotombori 1-6-18

JR 3

Japan has a number of restaurants that advertise their specialty with a giant animatronic crab, but none is more famous than the Kani Doraku branch in Osaka’s Dotombori entertainment district.

24. Sukibayashi Jiro
Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Roppongi 6-12-2 Roppongi Hills Keyakizakadori 3rd floor

Ever wanted to dine at the same sushi restaurant as sake-sampling heads of state and demanding Chinese exchange students? Here’s your chance.

23. Katsukura
Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Shimogyo-ku, Higashi Shiokojicho, Kyoto Station Building Senmontengai The Cube 11th floor

If you’re not interested in sushi, because of an aversion to raw food, this Kyoto Station restaurant specializes in deep-fried tonkatsu pork cutlets.

22. Yamato Sushi
Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Tsukiji 5-2-1, Tsukiji Fish Market, Building 6

Back to Tokyo, back to sushi with this restaurant located inside Japan’s largest seafood market.

21. New York Grill and Bar
Tokyo-to, Shinjuku-ku, Nishi Shinjuku 3-7-1-2 Park Hyatt Tokyo 52nd floor

JR 4

Yes, you can drink and dine just where Bill Murray’s character did in Lost in Translation. Sip your Suntory whiskey, marvel at the fantastic view of Tokyo, and wonder just how Bob and Charlotte managed to get bored in such a massive city with so many places to explore.

20. Kyoto Gogyo
Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Nakagyo-ku, Yanagibabadori, Takoyakushi Kudaru, Jumonji-cho

Japan’s ancient capital isn’t all rarified restaurants and delicate delicacies, as proven by the many fans of Kyoto Gogyo’s ramen.

19. Maiizumi
Tokyo-to, Shibuya-ku, Jingumae 4-8-5

Once again, deep-fried pork proves to be a hit with a wide cross-section of travelers, as yet another tonkatsu restaurant, the Aoyama branch of Maiizumi, makes the list.

18. Kamimura
Hokkaido, Abuta-gun, Kucchan-cho, Yamada 190-4, Shiki Niseko 1st floor

The Niseko ski resort shows up again, this time with the Michelin-ranked French/Japanese fusion Kamimura.

17. Midorizushi
Tokyo-to, Shibuya-ku, Dogenzaka 1-12, Shibuya Mark City East 4th floor

JR 5

Located beneath several floors of offices, you’ll want to get here before the lunch rush for some of Tokyo’s best reasonably-priced sushi.

16. Ro
Tokyo-to, Shibuya-ku, Jingumae, 6-2-4

If you’re not looking for the latest fashions, you might be tempted to pass on visiting Tokyo’s shopping mecca of Harajuku. If you’re into deep-fried gyoza pot stickers, though, you owe it to yourself to wade through the fashionistas and try the ones at Ro.

15. Chojiro
Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Shimogyo-ku, Hashimoto-cho, 103-2

You’ll see a few revolving sushi restaurants in any large Japanese city, but Trip Advisor’s didn’t find any they liked more than Chojiro.

14. Ninja Akasaka
Tokyo-to, Chiyoda-ku, Nagata-cho 2-14-3, Akasaka Tokyo Plaza 1st floor

JR 6

Even if it wasn’t designed to look like a secret ninja castle, and even if the wait staff didn’t perform incredible magic tricks at your table, Akasaka’s ninja-themed restaurant would still be worth a visit for its beautifully inventive and delicious food. Make sure you reserve a table ahead of time, though, as a two-hour wait isn’t unheard of.

13. Ukai
Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Shiba Koen 4-4-13

This branch of the Ukai chain, located near Tokyo Tower, specializes in tofu, which is served in private dining rooms surrounded by beautiful gardens.

12. Tapas Molecular Bar
Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 2-1-1 Mandarin Oriental Tokyo 38th floor

With space for only eight diners and just two seating per night, reservations are essential for this molecular cuisine restaurant in the luxury Mandarin Oriental Tokyo hotel.

11. Kaiseki 511
Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Akasaka 4-3-28 Dia Plaza Akasaka basement level 1

Although it’s located in the upscale Akasaka neighborhood of Tokyo, Kaiseki 511’s specialty is kobe beef.

10. Ichiran
Tokyo, Shibuya-ku, Jinnan 1-22-7 Iwamoto Building basement level 1

JR 1

While travelers gave the no to the Shibuya branch in Tokyo, there’s a whole chain of Ichiran ramen joints. The first time I ate in one on the outskirts of a red light district in Yokohama, I thought its unique setup, with privacy-insuring walls and a screen that ensures even the waiter doesn’t see your face, was to protect the privacy of diners who stopped in for a bite after spending time at one of the local hostess bars. The reality isn’t anything so untoward, as Ichiran’s owners simply want to make sure nothing distracts you from the delicious noodles they serve.

9. Ippudo
Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Nakagyo-ku, Higashi Toin, Nishikikoji Higashiiru 653-1 Nishiki Building 1st floor

Edging Ichiran for the top ramen restaurant on the list was Ippudo. The original location of this pork-broth specialist is in Fukuoka, but you can find branches of the chain in Tokyo and Yokohama as well.

8. Yamazaki
Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Tsukiji 5-2-1, Tsukiji Fish Market Building 6

Tsukiji gets still more help in building its reputation as the best place in Japan for sushi with this restaurant located inside the market.

7. Narisawa
Tokyo-to, Minato-ku, Aoyama 2-6-15

Trip Advisor’s number-seven restaurant actually did better in Hospitality Magazine’s rankings, where it was picked as the best in Japan for its innovative French-inspired menu that includes such unique offerings as dirt soup.

6. Hofu
Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Nakagyo-ku, Fuyachodori, Ebisugawa Noboru, Sasayacho 471-1

JR 7

This restaurant, which specializes in steak and beef cutlet, was Kyoto’s highest-ranked restaurant on the list.

5. Wakkoqu
Hyogo-ken, Kobe-shi, Chuo-ku, Kitanocho 1-1, Shin Kobe Oriental Avenue 3rd floor

It’s no surprise that Kobe’s top restaurant serves Kobe beef.

4. Kyube
Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Ginza 8-7-6

This sushi restaurant, located in Tokyo’s Ginza, came so close to taking the sushi crown away from Tsukiji.

3. Dai
Toyko-to, Chuo-ku, Tsukiji 5-2-1, Tsukiji Fish Market Building 6

JR 8

No, that’s not a photo of the entrance to Tokyo Station during rush hour. It’s just the line for lunch at Dai, Japan’s highest-ranked sushi restaurant.

JR 9

2. Center4 Hamburgers
Gifu-ken, Takayama-shi, Kamiichino-cho 94

JR 10

What’s more surprising, that Japan’s number-two restaurant is located in rural Takayama, or that it uses the region’s prized Hida beef to make mouth-watering hamburgers?

JR 11

1. M
Osaka-fu, Osaka-shi, Chuo-ku Namba 1-1-19

JR 12

Surprisingly, Trip Advisor’s top-ranked restaurant isn’t in Tokyo or Kyoto, and it doesn’t serve sushi or tempura. Instead, the Hozenji Yokocho branch of M in Osaka is ready to satisfy your carnivorous cravings with marbled Matsuzaka beef. Oddly enough, Matsuzaka beef isn’t raised in Osaka, but in Mie, two prefectures to the east.

Apparently the logistics aren’t a problem though, as travelers chose M as their favorite restaurant in the country.

 

Check out this link:

Travelers on Trip Advisor pick Japan’s 30 best restaurants

Link

Why you should eat wasabi with your sushi – the secrets behind 10 Japanese food pairings

 

RocketNews 24: 

FP 11

Traditions are taken very seriously in Japan, and one of the most noticeable examples is Japanese food. Certain foods and seasonings are always paired together, and while it may be tempting to dismiss this as just another example of the cultural homogeneity of an island nation, in several cases there are legitimate health benefits to these standard combinations.

Following are 10 culinary collaborations that won’t just fill you up and satisfy your taste buds, but leave you a little healthier, too:

Sushi and wasabi

FP 1

Let’s start with one of the most iconic teams in Japanese cuisine, sushi and the fiery paste that is wasabi.

Ordinarily, diners get a double punch of wasabi with each piece of sushi, as a dab of the condiment is placed in the rice, which is then dipped into a mixture of soy sauce blended with yet another dollop of wasabi. Although purists can’t imagine eating raw fish without it, some more casual sushi fans can’t handle the heat, and ask the chef to make their orderssabi nuki, or without wasabi.

But you’re actually missing out on a number of benefits if you’re passing on the wasabi, which helps to soften the smell of the fish, as well as drawing out more of its flavor. More importantly, wasabi is effective in suppressing microbes and bacteria that can cause food poisoning. So if you’re worried about eating your food raw, bear with the spiciness of the wasabi. It’s got a job to do.

Miso soup and seaweed

FP 2

Almost as ubiquitous as sushi and wasabi is the combination of miso soup with seaweed. Given its flimsy texture and near total lack of flavor, you’d be forgiven for assuming the seaweed isn’t there for anything other than aesthetic purposes.

It turns out, though, that seaweed helps compensate for one of the only health drawbacks to miso soup: its high sodium content. Nutrients in seaweed help to reduce both blood pressure and sodium levels in the body.

Rice balls and laver

FP 3

While we’re on the subject of plants from the ocean, what about the type of seaweed called laver that’s used to wrap onigiri, or rice balls?

At first this seems like something done strictly for the sake of convenience. You eat onigiri with your hands (nigiru is the Japanese word for “grab”), so if you don’t want to get rice all over them, you need some kind of covering. Onigiri predate plastic though, and the rice would stick to paper, depriving you of a few morsels when you unwrapped one. A thin strip of dried laver just seems like a natural, edible solution.

While that’s true, the laver also provides a huge nutritional benefit. Rice balls, by their nature, are almost entirely carbohydrates. In order to convert those carbs into energy, the body needs vitamin B, which laver is packed with. Conveniently, the quantity of vitamins in the B group necessary for one onigiri’s worth of carbohydrates is almost exactly equal to that contained in the amount of laver it takes to wrap one.

Raw tuna and yam

FP 4

Seafood makes up a large part of the Japanese diet, with tuna being one of the nation’s favorite fish. Raw tuna is often served with grated yam, which adds a little variety to its visual presentation (and also makes for a more economical meal than trying to fill up completely on pricey sashimi-grade fish).

The stickiness of Japanese yam takes some getting used to, and not even everyone born and raised in the country cares for it. The reason for its polarizing texture, though is the protein mucin, which helps the body to absorb the other proteins which tuna is rich in.

Saury and grated daikon radish

FP 5

Saury is another commonly eaten saltwater fish in Japan, which is almost always accompanied by grated daikon radish.

The saury is a small, slender fish, and since it’s usually grilled, you tend to end up with a lot of char on the skin. In general, the skin of fish are eaten in Japan, both for their flavor and their nutrients. However, that char isn’t exactly the healthiest thing, as it contains carcinogens. The grated daikon, usually mixed with a bit of soy sauce, helps to purge those carcinogens from the body.

Tofu and bonito flakes

FP 12

Saury and grated daikon is a decidedly old-school combo. They often appear as part of a traditional Japanese meal that involves several side dishes, one of which is likely to be tofu topped with bonito flakes.

Like the laver in miso soup, this again seems like a cosmetic choice at first. But while tofu has a plethora of amino acids, one that it’s decidedly lacking in is methionine. Methionine is essential for maintaining hair color as you age, as well as numerous other things we’re too vain and unintelligent to understand or care about. Thankfully, dried bonito is packed with the stuff, making it the prefect finishing touch for this amino acid cocktail.

Freshwater eel and sansho

FP 6

All of this talk of dainty health foods is making us hungry, so let’s move on to heartier fare, like unagi, or freshwater eel.

Unagi is usually butterflied, slathered with sauce, grilled, then topped with a dash of the slightly bitter, pepper-like powdered seasoning sansho. Aside from giving the unagi a little color, sansho helps cut down on the eel’s smell, and the condiment is also said to warm the digestive organs and help in breaking down the oils of the unagi, both of which aid in digestion.

Pork cutlet and cabbage

FP 7

But if you’re really hungry, nothing will fill you up quite like tonkatsu, or pork cutletTonkatsu always comes with a pile of shredded cabbage, which we assumed was simply the closest someone ordering a hunk of deep-fried pig could come to eating a salad.

Once again, though, the cabbage has a vital role to play. The vegetable is rich in vitamin U (something we honestly didn’t know existed), which helps prevent gastric hyperacidity. In other words, that cabbage will keep you from getting a tummy ache. There are limits to what even cabbage can do, though, so don’t assume you can chow down on a second cutlet with no ill effects as long as you finish the cabbage served with it.

Pork curry and pickled shallots

FP 8

Still hungry? Then how about some curry. At just about any curry restaurant in Japan, you’ll find a jar of pickled shallots on the table, from which diners can take as much as they want. On the surface, this may seem like some ill-thought out method to improve your breath, reasoning that the combined negative effects of curry, onions, and the pickling process will somehow wrap the scale back around and make your breath smell fresh and clean again.

The bad news is that no matter how many pickled shallots (called rakkyo in Japanese) you put away, you’re still going to need a breath mint or four. The good news is that those shallots have plenty of allysine, an amino acid that promotes absorption of the vitamin B1 in pork.

Beer and edamame

FP 9

Last, and by no means least, one of our favorite pairings in Japan: ice-cold beer and a bowl of edamame, or soybeans.

Edamame are lightly salted and served in the shell. Aside from the fun of popping them directly into your mouth, they’re a much lower calorie beer companion than peanuts or potato chips. Best of all, edamame contain methionine, like the bonito flakes mentioned above, plus vitamins B1 and C, which together help the liver in processing alcohol.

Of course, you could sidestep the whole problem of having to process alcohol by simply not consuming it in the first place. You could easily make the argument that pairing edamame with beer isn’t any better than edamame and tea, or edamame and juice.

And now, with a rebuttal, is beer.

Check out this link:

Why you should eat wasabi with your sushi – the secrets behind 10 Japanese food pairings

Source: Naver Matome

Link

6 of Asia’s most addictive, fattiest, calorie-loaded foods

A study has found that fatty foods may truly be addictive — even potentially as addictive as drugs like cocaine and heroin. So we got to wondering what Asian foods and dishes could rival bacon and cheesecake. We’re not talking Asian beefcakes here. We mean true heart-stopping, artery-filling, scale-breaking calorie busters. We think we found six that make cheesecake, even a bacon-loaded cheesecake, look like a well balanced diet.

1. Hongshao Rou — Chinese

hongshao_rou-1

Dish: Red braised pork belly: With 600 calories and 50g of fat per 100g this Shanghainese dish could give you love handles just by looking at it. If there is a Chinese food equivelant to crack cocaine, Hongshao Rou would be it. It was also supposedly Chairman Mao’s favorite dish.

For more on Hongshao Rou, click here. Also keep an eye out for Cantonese pork belly dishes such as the braised pork belly with pickled mustard greens.

2. Tonkatsu — Japanese

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA

Dish: Fried pork over rice served with Tonkatsu sauce: The exact calorie and fat count can vary depending on preparation, but this Japanese dish still stands in contrast to the typically strong reputation of Japanese cuisine being healthy.

Other notable super fatty, calorie-rich Japanese dishes are fried jumbo tempura king prawns and beef teriyaki.

3. Char Kuay Teow (pan fried noodles) — Singaporean

CharKwayteow

A typical serving size of char kuay teow weighs in at around 300g. Those 300g will set your gut back a few weeks with 30g of fat and 22.8g of saturated fat according to the Singaporean Health Promotion Board. Our Singapore city editor Larry Loh said, “The best ones are cooked with pork lard and there’s little bits of crispy fried pork lard and raw cockles to boot.”

Please keep in mind that gym memberships are typically not included with purchase of a pan fried noodle meal in Singapore. Perhaps they should be.

4. Green Curry — Thai

PorkCurry

Green curries are known for being high in calories and fat content because of the use of lots of coconut milk. Where there is coconut milk, there are calories. Throw some pork into the mix and the tasty popular dish can hit around 29g of fat per 100g.

5. Hongshao Shizi Tou (red braised meatballs) — Chinese

hong_shao_shizi_tou

Fried meatballs. Re-used sauce. 400 calories and 40g of fat per 100g and people still don’t feel full while eating them. Worst of all, they’re good. Good enough to want to go for a second course. Maybe wash some of these down with a McDonald’s Big Mac (32.5g of fat per burger) and you’ll be set for the evening. For more on Hongshao Shizi Touclick here.

6. Nalla/Nalli Nihari — Indian

Nahli

A North Indian Mohglai recipe intended as a breakfast snack, Nalli Nihari found more of a home as a full-on meal due to its heaviness. How heavy are we talking? Indians traditionally use ghee when making Nalli Nihari. Ghee is a clarified butter used as a base for cooking. In the West, oil would be used in its place. How deadly is ghee? It is composed almost entirely of saturated fat and weighs in at around 8mg of cholesterol per tablespoon.

Nalli Nihari has been known to be prepared with 1 cup of ghee per 1 kilo of mutton with bones.

Check out this link:

6 of Asia’s most addictive, fattiest, calorie-loaded foods