Calbee teams with gourmet French chain for uni and dried roe potato chip flavor

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RocketNews 24:

Calbee and the casual-gourmet French chain Ore no French will release an “Uni and Dried Roe Kyokujo Cream Saucepotato chip flavor on March 21.

The “Ore no” series of restaurants boasts a unique concept: By doing away with all the niceties of typical gourmet restaurants, such as spacious dining areas, unfailingly polite and classically trained servers, and chairs, the chain serves up gourmet meals devised or prepared by renowned chefs at just a fraction of the price you’d typically expect to pay.

It’s this exact dynamic of delicious and kind of crusty that sort of makes “Ore no French” — the company’s French fusion lineup of restaurants — and Calbee, the Japanese potato chip maker, a match made in heaven. And in fact, the two entities have just announced their third release in a collaborative potato chip series, this time introducing “Uni and Dried Roe Kyokujo Cream Sauce” potato chips due to hit shelves on March 21.

The flavor was specially conceived by the head chef of the Kagurazaka area location of Ore no French, Yousuke Yamazaki, and contains real powdered uni and mullet roe.

 

Staggering servings of salmon roe are waiting for you at these four Tokyo restaurants

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RocketNews 24:

There are a couple of distinct price tiers to seafood in Japan. Squid and octopus tend to be very budget-friendly, with a step up in price for sashimi-grade tuna and salmon. Among the most premium offerings of all is where you’ll find salmon roe, or ikura as it’s known in Japanese.

Due to its high cost, ikura is usually served in modest quantities, sometimes seeming more like a garnish than a legitimate component of the meal. However, that’s not the case at these four Tokyo restaurants, which dish up such generous portions that their ikura literally overflows the bowl.

As one of Japan’s most popular dining websites, Guru Navi (short for “Gourmet Navigation”) will let you filter restaurant search results by a wide variety of parameters. Recently, though, the site made a special point of highlighting a group of four restaurants that are known for their overflowing ikura bowls.

Referred to as ikura koboredon, the decadent dish is most commonly seen on the northern island of Hokkaido, the surroundings waters of which serve as the source for the lion’s share of Japan’s salmon roe. All four of these restaurants are located inside Tokyo, though, which means they’re within easy striking distance if you’re craving some ikura after a day of sightseeing, work, or school in Japan’s capital.

Let’s dive face-first into this collection of ikura goodness.

1. Hokkaido Shiretoko Gyojo /北海道知床漁場

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Address: Tokyo-to, Toshima-ku, Minami Ikebukuro 1-13-21, Izumiya Building basement level 1 / 東京都豊島区南池袋1-13-21 和泉屋ビルB1
Open 5 p.m.-midnight


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Just opened in late February, this Ikebukuro restaurant takes its name from Hokkaido’s Shiretoko Peninsula, considered to have some of the tastiest ikura in the country. Ordinarily, the restaurant’s full-size ikura rice bowl, called the Nore Sore!! Nannmmara Kobore Ikuradon will cost 1,980 yen (US $16.80), with half-sizes available for 1,280 yen. As part of its opening campaign, though, customers can print out or display the couponhere and get a half-size bowl absolutely free!

 

2. Totoshigure / ととしぐれ

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Address: Tokyo-to, Shibuya-ku, Shibuya, 3-13-7, Godo Building basement level 1 / 東京都渋谷区渋谷3-13-7 五常ビルB1
Open Monday-Friday 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., 5 p.m.-5 a.

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Totoshigure has the cheapest menu-priced overflowing salmon roe bowl of any restaurant on the list, as the otsubo ikura no kobore meshi will only set you back 890 yen. If ikura’s not your thing the restaurant’s uni (sea urchin) bowl is similarly staggering in size.

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3. Iroriya / いろり家

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Address: Tokyo-to, Chuo-ku, Ginza 3-11-11, Ginza Sambankan 2 basement level 2 / 東京都中央区銀座3-11-11 銀座参番館2 B1
Open Monday-Friday 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., 5 p.m.-4 a.m.; Weekends 5 p.m.-11 p.m.

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Moving from youthful Shibuya to blueblood Ginza, Iroriya’s profile was raised when it was mentioned on the cover of a popular adult magazine last year. You won’t find anything scandalous inside, although the massive funajo meshi ikura bowls, in prices ranging from 2,480 to 3,980 yen depending on size, will stimulate your appetite.

4. En / 炎

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Address: Tokyo-to, Edogawa-ku, Funabori 1-7-17, Crystal Funabori 1st floor /東京都江戸川区船堀1-7-17 クリスタル船堀1F
Open Monday-Thursday, Sunday, holidays 5 p.m.-1 a.m.; Friday-Saturday and days preceding holidays 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

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Finally, we come to En, where the recommended way to eat a mountain of ikura is with a dollop of fiery wasabi added. Like many of the other examples on this list, the 1,280-yen kobore ikuradon seems like a deal that’s too good to be true. With portions this big, can the restaurant actually be making money off the dish?

Possibly not. En’s owner, who was born in the city of Hakodate on Hokkaido, says he’s prepared to lose money on his giant salmon roe servings, and that his real goal is for the people of Tokyo to come away with a renewed appreciation of the regional cuisine of his home prefecture. As a matter of fact, so seriously does he take the task that he personally scoops the ikura into the bowls that are delivered to eagerly waiting customers.

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Of course, the better time customers are having, the more likely they are to order a glass of beer or bottle of sake to go along with the loss-leading ikura bowl. But hey, ikura and sake go great together, so in the end it’s a win-win for all involved.

All-You-Can-Eat Sushi in Tokyo for only 1050 Yen (US $13)… (*But per-plate penalty if you can’t finish)

RocketNews 24:

While a popular format for sushi restaurants in some foreign countries like America, it’s much more difficult to find all-you-can-eat sushi in Japan than one would think.

If you are in Japan and are looking to gorge yourself on maguro, saba or whatever else floats your sushi boat, look no further than Tabehodai Sushi Club, a little place in Ueno, Tokyo that has all-you-can-eat sushi for only 1050 yen (US $13).

The restaurant is said to be popular with foreigners and, during the busiest hours, has a line outside the door on any given day.

Review:

Anyone who has been to all-you-can-eat in Japan is likely aware that it’s common for customers to be restricted to 1-2 hours until they need to clear out or pay extra to extend their stay. Tabehodai Sushi Club surprisingly has no such time limit but customers must pay a penalty fee for each dish they order but fail to eat—70 yen for nigirizushi and 120 yen for makizushi or gunkanmaki.

I sat down at my table, was handed an order sheet and proceeded to fill it out with my favorites: ama-ebi, ikura, maguro, shime-saba, and so on.

The sushi came 15 minutes later and, for my first taste test, I plopped the ikura (salted salmon roe) nigirizushi into my mouth and…

…hrm…perhaps a little flaccid…

Okay, so how about the uni (sea urchin)?

…hrm…perhaps too small to tell how it actually tastes…

Alright then, let’s try the ama-ebi (sweet shrimp)!

…!!! Okay, not bad at all! They might want to tone down the wasabi though…

Unfortunately, that ama-ebi was the highlight of my Sushi Club experience, but really, that’s only to be expected given the price.

Basically, if you’re looking for quality over quantity at a reasonable price (which, I guess, is what all-you-can-eat is all about), then save some room in your stomach and head over to Ueno for copious amounts of second-rate sushi!

 

・Store Information
Restaurant: Tabehoudai Sushi Club,
Address: 6-13-4 Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo
Hours: 11:00-22:00
Open throughout the year

Photos: RocketNews24

 

Skilled Japanese artist creates intricate cut-paper origami cranes

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RocketNews 24:

Kiri-e (切り絵) is the Japanese art of hand-cutting paper into intricate designs. Kirigami(切り紙), on the other hand, involves cutting and folding paper to create a 3-D image that pops right off the page. But one talented Japanese artist has combined these two traditional art forms, creating folded paper cranes that contain a seemingly impossible-to-achieve cut-out design. Let’s take a closer look at her stunning artwork!

Going by the name Uni (Japanese for “sea urchin) on her Twitter, this steady-handed artist shows an amazing amount of skill as she’s able to fold, cut and bend paper into a delicately designed paper crane. Here is just a small sample of Uni’s work:

She’s also amazingly able to replicate the same technique and style in miniature form, shrinking her designs down to the size of a 1-yen coin (22 millimeters/0.87 inches).

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Uni has also created stained glass paper cranes. The way the light passes through each hand-cut panel is simply gorgeous!

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Of course, Uni makes traditional kiri-e creations as well. Here’s a beautiful flower cut from a single piece of paper:

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We’re sure by now you can’t get enough of Uni’s beautiful artwork. So hop on over to her pixiv site for more of her kiri-e and kirigami paper cranes!

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Sushi Gifs to help you finally remember the difference between ‘Uni’ and ‘Sake’

 

Foodbeast:

Sushi has evolved over the years from an unknown entity to trendy universal dish to irreplaceable staple, winning over the hearts of even the most disbelieving of Americans. Sushi is constantly evolving –  new ingredients, preparation and serving methods — traditional nigiri sushi, cut rolls wrapped in seaweed or soy paper, creative additions like cream cheese, spicy mayonnaise and deep-fried rolls… dare I go on? It’s difficult at times to know exactly what is going on with little to no menu descriptions and endless varieties of fish to be devoured.

Fortunately, tumblr artist Slimu has come to the aide of those loyal, yet at times challenged, sushi lovers.

Slimu offers up a unique alternative way to help you remember what the different types of fish and ingredients are so you can feel confident in what you are ordering. Even if these gifs don’t help you remember that “uni” means “sea urchin,” at least you’ll remember smiling at the bouncing jolly sushi characters. Peek some of our favorites below.

Additionally, this excellent how-to-eat sushi guide will aid you on your quest to becoming a true sushi aficionado.

Check out this link:

Sushi Gifs to help you finally remember the difference between ‘Uni’ and ‘Sake’