New font incorporates English pronunciations into Japanese katakana

Dramafever:

A U.K. company named Johnson Banks has come with an ingenious way to include English pronunciation in Japanese katakana characters. The company has dubbed this new font cleverly as “Phonetikana,” where each katakana character featured a few English letters to help English speakers say the word properly.

The company started incorporating the new font in simple words like “banana” and “tomato” but also showed what longer phrases such as the “sound of something spinning” would look like. The first simple example that company showed is the katakana characters for Uniqlo versus the new Phonetikana.

It’s a really brilliant idea, and I’m sure it will be incredibly helpful for so many people who are trying to learn Japanese.

The name Michael

Uniqlo 

Uniqlo in Phonetikana

Niko Niko=smile

 ˜Doki Doki =the sound of my heart beating

Kuru Kuru=˜sound of something spinning

Cheese=Group Photo

Tomato=tomato

Toppu banana=top banana

Biggu Appuru=big apple

Uniqlo to offer four-day work week to working mothers

UQ 2

RocketNews 24:

It’s hard being a working mom, juggling the important yet difficult goals of providing both the financial and emotional support children need. But while having to look for a new job because of incompatible work and family demands is never pleasant, it’s still a more viable option than finding new kids, as clothing retailer Uniqlo knows all too well.

The company has been having trouble retaining female employees with children, with many citing the need for more flexibility in their work schedule as their reason for leaving the company. In response, Uniqlo has announced that this autumn it will be offering full-time employees the option of a four-day work week.

From its humble beginnings as a low-key provider of plain yet affordable clothing, Uniqlo has become one Japan’s highest-profile companies. It’s developed its own sense of style, and has been actively expanding to other countries.

As the company grows, though, it’s also reexamining how it does business, and its human resources department has come up with a plan to help make Uniqlo a more accommodating place for its female employees to work. In order to help its working mothers structure their lives in a way that helps them care for their children, the company will introduce a system in which full-time employees can opt for a four-day workweek instead of a five-day one.

Employees on the four-day system won’t see their total work hours change, as they’ll work 10-hour shifts instead of the eight-hour stretches of the five-day schedule. Their base pay will also remain unchanged.

But even if the total hours worked are the same, having a third day off every week means one less day of arranging for daycare service for children, as well as shuttling them to and from the facility. It’s also one less day of commuting, which would be a major time savings for people working in urban Japan, where a one-way trip to work of 60 minutes or more isn’t at all unusual.

The four-day schedule will be offered to a total of 10,000 store employees, or roughly one fifth of Uniqlo’s total workforce. While the system is primarily aimed at female employees, apparently some men will also be given the choice between the four and five-day format.

Uniqlo plans to introduce the four-day workweek option this October.

Uniqlo teams up with Muslim fashion designer Hana Tajima for modest fashion line

Daily Mail (UK):

Japanese retail company Uniqlo has teamed up with Muslim fashion designer, Hana Tajima, to create a modest ‘lifewear’ collection for women.

The collection includes long, flowing skirts, tapered ankle-length pants and traditional wear like kebaya and hijabs, with the company saying the collection ‘fuses contemporary design and comfortable fabrics with traditional values.’

Designed by popular British fashion blogger Tajima, the range carefully blends modern prints and colours with modest cuts to cater to all women who embrace a modest style.

Uniqlo x Tajima: Uniqlo's new collection with Hana Tajima offers fashionable yet modest clothing 

Inspired: Fashion designer Hana Tajima converted to Islam at 17 and has always been passionate about finding ways to keep traditional and conservative clothing and accessories flattering on the body 

The popular fashion blogger, who converted to Islam at 17, announced the collaboration on her personal blog, saying it felt wonderful to let her mind run and ‘unearth’ her ideas.

Now you get to see it in its whole form and it’s all for you,’ Tajima wrote.

Uniqlo (Japan) 2015 Fall/Winter Lookbook

‘Star Wars’ x Uniqlo UT (Japan) 2015 Spring/Summer Collection

STORE by NIGO® set to open in Harajuku’s Laforet

Coming soon from NIGO is the polymath’s latest retail endeavor. Simply dubbed STORE by NIGO, the brand new space is set to open by the end of April at Harajuku’s Laforet department store and follow’s NIGO’s latest work with the likes of UNITED ARROWS, adidas Originals, Tetsu Nishiyama, and UNIQLO.

For those interested, job openings for the new endeavor can be found over at honeyee.com.

 

Shochiku x UNIQLO UT 2015 Spring/Summer Kabuki Collection

Uniqlo has unveiled an upcoming collaboration with iconic Japanese film and theater company Shochiku Co. Ltd, under the stewardship of creative director NIGO. A line of men’s and women’s clothing will reflect Kabuki traditions and the vibrant colors of Japanese theater culture and costumes, all skewed through the lens of pop culture in NIGO’s inimitable style.

The collection is set to launch in Paris, New York and Tokyo at the end of the month, as highlighted in this enigmatic teaser video released today.